Recovery console windows 8

Recovery console windows 8 DEFAULT

Table of Contents

  1. Introduction
  2. How to start the Recovery Environment Command Prompt in Windows 8
  3. List of Windows 8 Recovery Environment Command Prompt commands
  4. How to load a registry hive in the Recovery Environment Command Prompt
  5. How to determine the drive letter of your Windows drive
  6. Conclusion

 

Introduction

When Windows is no longer able to start it is typically because of a problem in the Windows Registry, a driver conflict, or malware crashing the computer. Windows startup issues can be one of the most frustrating issues to deal with because you do not have easy access to the file and data we need to fix these problems. Thankfully, we can use the Windows 8 Recovery Environment Command Prompt to assist us in resolving these types of problems. This tool allows you to access your Windows Registry and file system when Windows is offline. This will allow you to fix numerous issues such as corrupt Registry data and malware infections.

The Recovery command prompt is especially useful when it comes to removing Rootkits. One of the biggest trends in computer infections is the use of rootkits that hide files and Registry information while they are running in Windows. By using the Recovery Command Prompt you will have full visibility into the files that these rootkits are hiding or using because Windows, and the malware, will not be started. This allows you to quickly find the infections and remove them so that they are not active the next time you start Windows.

This tutorial will explain how to access the Recovery Command Prompt and use it efficiently. We have also outlined how you can access your offline Registry and some basic commands to help you get started using this powerful tool.

 

How to start the Recovery Environment Command Prompt in Windows 8

To access the Command Prompt in the Windows Recovery Environment you need to go to the Windows 8 Start Screen and type Advanced. When the search results appear click on the Settings category as shown below.

 

Advanced start screen search

 

Now click on the option labeled Advanced startup options and you will be brought to the General PC Settings screen. Scroll down to the bottom until you see an option labeled Advanced startup.

 

General PC Settings screen

 

Click on the Restart now button and Windows 8 will restart your computer and go directly into the Advanced Startup options menu.

 

Advanced startup options menu

 

Now click on the Troubleshoot button and then the Advanced options button. When the advanced options screen opens, click on the Command Prompt option. A new screen will be displayed with an open command prompt.

 

Recovery Environment Command Prompt

 

The Company Prompt is a small black Windows that displays your current folder location on the computer. To use the Command Prompt, you need to type in commands that you wish your computer to execute. A list of the commands that you can use in the Recovery Environment Command Prompt can be found in the next section. When you are done using the command prompt, you should type Exit to get back to the Advanced options menu, where you can reboot your computer.

 

List of Windows 8 Recovery Environment Command Prompt commands

Unlike Windows, which has a graphical user interface, the Windows 8 Recovery command prompt requires you to type in all your commands. Simply type a valid command that you wish to perform and then press the Enter key on your keyboard. It is also possible to start some graphical programs like Notepad or an antivirus program from within the Recovery Console command prompt. Unfortunately, not every Windows program will run in this environment, so you will need to test each one to determine if they will work.

A partial list of commands and prompts that work within the command prompt are listed below. To get help on how to use these commands, you can use the /h or /? arguments to get help information for the commands. For example, if you wish to see the help information for bcdedit you would type bcdedit /h and then press Enter on your keyboard. The help information for the program would then be displayed in the command prompt. If there is too much information, you can pipe the help information through the more command. This allows you to see the help information one page at a time. To do that you would type bcdedit /h | more and press Enter on your keyboard.

The list of commands are:

 

Console Command

Description

attrib Allows you to change permissions on files.
bcdboot BCDboot is a tool used to quickly set up a system partition, or to repair the boot environment located on the system partition.
bcdedit Displays and allows you to change how Windows boots up. This command is useful for people who are having trouble with the Windows Boot Manager
cd Changes the current directory to another directory.
chkdsk Checks a hard disk for errors and attempts to repair them.
copy Copy a file from one location to another.
defrag Allows you to defrag your hard drive.
del Deletes a file
dir Lists the files and folders in the current directory
diskpart Load the Windows disk management program. From this program you can create, delete, shrink, and expand your existing partitions as well as get information about partitions and hard drives
format Allows you to format drives.
icacls Change file and folder permissions and display or modify access control lists (ACLs)
manage-bde.exe Configure BitLocker drive encryption on disk volumes.
mkdir Creates a new folder
more Displays the content of a file one page at a time
move Moves a file or a folder
recover Allows you to attempt to recover files from a damaged drive.
reg Perform Windows Registry operations.
ren Rename a file or folder
rd Remove an empty folder
sfc Scans and checks the integrity of your Windows files. Useful way to see if a system file is missing or has been tampered with.
type Display the contents of a file
xcopy Copy a folder or files to another location

 

Windows Program Name

Description/Notes

bmrui.exe This command will open the System Image Recovery screen to restore Windows from an image.
Notepad.exe Opens up the Windows Notepad so you can view and edit text files. You can also use the file browser when click the File -> Open menus to copy, move, rename, and delete files.
Regedit.exe The Windows Registry Editor.
rstrui.exe The System Restore console where you can restore your computer back to earlier restore points.

 

When you are finished using the Command Prompt you can exit it by typing exit and then pressing the Enter key on your keyboard. The command prompt will close and you will now be back at the list of available repair tools, where you can reboot your computer.

 

How to load a registry hive in the Recovery Environment Command Prompt

An extremely important feature of the Recovery Command Prompt is the ability to load Windows Registry hives and then be able to access them with Regedit. This will allow you to stop computer infections from automatically starting or repair corrupt Registry data that may be causing issues when starting Windows 8. A good example of how this can be used is when a computer infection is locking your desktop when you start Windows. To fix this, you would just start the Windows Recovery Environment Command Prompt, load the hives, delete the Run value that is loading the infection, and unload them again. Then when you restart your computer the infection will not be started and you can access your desktop again.

A registry hive can be loaded using the reg command. For more information on how to use this command, you can type reg load /? and press Enter on your keyboard. An example of how we can load Registry hives to fix a corrupt Userinit entry can be seen below:

Type REG LOAD HKLM\WinSoft and press Enter to load the HKLM\Software Registry hive as the WinSoft key.

Type regedit.exe and press Enter to start the Windows Registry Editor. When the Registry editor is started, browse to HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Run key.

Look for the Registry value that is loading the computer infection and delete it.

Close the Windows Registry Editor.

In the command prompt type REG UNLOAD HKLM\WinSoft and press Enter to unload the Registry hive.

Type exit and press Enter on your keyboard to go back to the Advanced Options screen. You can then reboot your computer from there.

Please note that in the above commands I have specified drive letters as

 

How to determine the drive letter of your Windows drive

When you are in the Recovery Command Prompt, the drive letters for your hard drives changes. This can cause your Windows install to be listed under a different drive letter than it normally has. To find out the drive letter assigned to your normal Windows drive, you can use the bcdedit.exe program.

To find the drive letter of your Windows installation under the Recovery Command Prompt, please type the following command and then press Enter on your keyboard.

bcdedit | find "osdevice"

When you run this command it will display output that is similar to os device partition=D:. The letter after the partition= is the drive where Windows installation resides. To change your current working directory to that drive, you can type D:, or whatever other drive letter it shows, and press Enter on your keyboard.

 

Conclusion

As you can see the Windows 8 Recovery Command Prompt is a powerful tool for fixing problems that would normally not allow you to start Windows. The ability to access your files and the Windows Registry while Windows 8 is offline is a powerful tool for fixing corrupted Registry and removing malware. If you find other useful programs or tools for the Windows Recovery environment please let us know in the forums so we can update this tutorial.

As always if you have any questions or tips on using the Windows 8 Recovery Environment command prompt you should let us know in the Windows 8 Forum.

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Sours: https://www.bleepingcomputer.com/tutorials/windowsrecovery-environment-command-prompt/

Recovery Console: What It Is & a List of Commands

The Recovery Console is a command line based, advanced diagnostic feature available in some early versions of the Windows operating system.

Recovery Console is used to help resolve a number of major system problems. It's particularly useful for repairing or replacing important operating system files.

When these files aren't working as they should, Windows will sometimes not start up at all. In these cases, you must start the Recovery Console to restore the files.

Recovery Console Availability

The Recovery Console feature is available in Windows XP, Windows , and Windows Server

Recovery Console is not available in Windows 10, Windows 8, Windows 7, or Windows Vista. Windows Server and Windows XP were the last Microsoft operating systems that contained Recovery Console.

Windows 7 and Windows Vista replaced Recovery Console with a collection of recovery tools referred to as System Recovery Options.

In Windows 10 and Windows 8, neither Recovery Console nor System Recovery Options are available. Instead, Microsoft created the arguably more powerful Advanced Startup Options as a central place to diagnose and repair Windows problems from outside the running operating system.

How to Access & Use Recovery Console

The usual way to access the Recovery Console is via booting from a Windows installation CD. Recovery Console can also sometimes be accessed from the boot menu, but only if it has been pre-installed on your system.

A number of commands, unsurprisingly called Recovery Console commands (all listed below), are available from within Recovery Console. Using these commands in specific ways can help solve specific problems.

Here are some examples where executing a particular command in the Recovery Console is necessary to fix a serious Windows issue:

Recovery Console Commands

As mentioned above, several commands are available within Recovery Console, quite a few of them exclusive to the tool. When used, these commands can do things as simple as copying a file from one place to another, or as complicated as repairing the master boot record after a major virus attack.

Recovery Console commands are similar to Command Prompt commands and DOS commands, but are completely different tools with different options and abilities.

Below is a complete list of Recovery Console commands, along with links to more detailed information about how to use each command:

CommandPurpose
AttribChanges or displays the file attributes of a file or folder
BatchUsed to create a script to run other Recovery Console commands
BootcfgUsed to build or modify the boot.ini file
ChdirChanges or displays the drive letter and folder you're working from
ChkdskIdentifies, and often corrects, certain hard drive errors (aka check disk)
ClsClears the screen of all previously entered commands and other text
CopyCopies a single file from one location to another
DeleteDeletes a single file
DirDisplays a list of files and folders contained inside the folder you're working from
DisableDisables a system service or device driver
DiskpartCreates or deletes hard drive partitions
EnableEnables a system service or device driver
ExitEnds the current Recovery Console session and then restarts the computer
ExpandExtracts a single file or group of files from a compressed file
FixbootWrites a new partition boot sector to the system partition that you specify
FixmbrWrites a new master boot record to the hard drive you specify
FormatFormats a drive in the file system you specify
HelpProvides more detailed information on any of the other Recovery Console commands
ListsvcLists the services and drivers available in your Windows installation
LogonUsed to gain access to the Windows installation you specify
MapDisplays the partition and hard drive that each drive letter is assigned to
MkdirCreates a new folder
MoreUsed to display information inside a text file (same as type command)
Net use[included in Recovery Console but is not usable]
RenameChanges the name of the file you specify
RmdirUsed to delete an existing and completely empty folder
SetEnables or disables certain options in Recovery Console
SystemrootSets the %systemroot% environment variable as the folder you're working from
TypeUsed to display information inside a text file (same as more command)

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Access the Command Prompt from Windows 8 Recovery Drive

Use the Send To command from the Open dialog box to copy files to a flash drive or external USB drive

Backing up data

If your Windows 8 system stopped booting up normally before you had a chance to make a current backup of your data, chances are that the first thing that you would want to do is backup your data files. Well, if you look back at the command line tools shown in Table A, you'll find several commands that you can use to back up your data: Copy, Robocopy, and Xcopy.

However, if you're like most users, you'd rather work from a GUI than a command prompt when it comes to copying hundreds of files. Fortunately, the Windows Recovery Environment allows you to run Notepad. How is Notepad going to help you copy files you may be thinking? Well, in the majority of Windows applications, the Open and Save as dialog boxes are essentially pared down versions of File Explorer. As such, you can use the Open dialog box just like File Explorer and will be able to easily copy all of your data files to a backup drive.

Once you have booted into the Recovery Environment connect a flash drive or external USB drive to your system. Now, access the Command Prompt window and type notepad.exe on the command line. Once you have Notepad up and running, just press [Ctrl]+O to access the Open dialog box. Leave the File name box blank, select All Files (*.*) in the Files of type list, and just leave the Encoding setting as it is.

Now, use the Computer icon to locate your Windows installation drive. (Refer to using the bcdedit | find "osdevice" command as described above.) To continue, navigate to your user profile folder, as shown in Figure K. Then, right click on the folder or folders containing the files that you want to backup and then select the Send to command. When you do, you can select your flash drive or external USB drive. When you do, your files will be safely copied.

Keep in mind that you should not close the Open dialog box or Notepad until all the files are copied

What's your take?

Do you think that being able to edit the registry and backup files from the Windows 8 Recovery Drive Command Prompt are valuable tricks? As always, if you have comments or information to share about this topic, please take a moment to drop by the TechRepublic Community Forums and let us hear from you.

Also read:

Credit: Images by Greg Shultz for TechRepublic

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Tutorial: Reinstall Windows 8.1 using the recovery partition

How to Access the Windows Recovery Environment (Windows RE)

This article applies to Windows Vista and Windows 7/8.x/

The Windows Recovery Environment (typically referred to as Windows RE or WinRE) is partially analogous to the Windows Recovery Console of Windows /XP.  Most computer manufacturers or administrators configure Windows systems with Windows RE installed to a local hard drive. In addition, current versions of Windows will automatically install and enable Windows RE when Windows is installed or upgraded. If Windows RE is functional, Windows will automatically run it if a boot failure is detected.

Windows RE may also be accessed manually if it's installed to a local hard disk and is enabled. The method used depends on the version of Windows:

Windows Vista / Windows 7
Press and hold the F8 key early in the system boot process. Then select the Repair your computer option from the boot menu that appears. 

Note:
If your computer uses the F8 key for the BIOS Boot Menu (ASUS boards, for example), make sure to start pressing the F8 key after the BIOS screen has passed and before Windows has started to boot. In some cases, it may be easier to press F8 early to open the BIOS Boot Menu and then select the Windows drive to boot and immediately press F8 again.

Windows 8.x
Press WinKey+I and click the Power icon. Hold down Shift and click Restart. Click Troubleshooting and then Advanced options to bring up the repair options.

Windows /10
Press WinKey+X to open the Quick Link menu. Click Shut down or sign out, then hold down Shift and click Restart. (In Windows 10 you can also open the Start menu, click on Power and then Shift-click Restart.) Click Troubleshooting and then Advanced options to bring up the repair options.

Note: If you would like to enable using F8 to access the Windows /10 legacy Safe Mode menu (as with Windows 7) please refer to the instructions at the end of this article.

If Windows RE is not installed or is unable to boot from the internal drive, access it as detailed below. Please note that the prompts and screens shown vary depending on the version and type of Windows boot media used, but the basics are the same.

  1. Insert the Windows installation disc/UFD, Repair Disc, or Recovery Drive and restart the computer.

    Note: If you are running Windows 7 and don't have a Windows 7 DVD, you can create a System Repair Disc by running Start >> All Programs >> Maintenance >> Create a System Repair Disc. If you are running Windows 8.x/10 you can create a Recovery Drive or Repair Disc by opening the Control Panel and running the Recovery program.

  2. Press a key when the Press any key to boot from CD or DVD message appears (this prompt is not shown on some types of Windows boot media). If you don't press a key quickly enough, you will need to wait until the computer has finished booting and then reboot the computer and try again.

  3. After the initialization process completes, you may be prompted to select a Language to install, Time and currency format, and Keyboard or input method.  Configure each of these settings and then click Next.

  4. If shown, click the Repair your computer option that appears near the bottom of the window to access Windows RE.

  5. If Windows RE scans for existing Windows installations, let it finish. If using the Windows 7 RE, make sure the Use recovery tools that can help fix problems starting Windows option is selected.

  6. In Windows Vista RE and Windows 7 RE click Next. In the Windows 8.x/10 RE click on Troubleshooting and then Advanced options to access the repair options.

  7. Important: At any point during these procedures, if you are following manual repair instructions, please cancel any automatic repair options offered by Windows RE and instead select the option to run the Command Prompt. 

Enable using F8 to access the Windows /10 legacy Safe Mode menu

Windows /10 can be configured to enable pressing the F8 key on boot-up to access the legacy Safe Mode menu used by Windows 7. This is supported on both MBR and GPT Windows installations.

Instructions:

  1. Boot into Windows. If you are booting multiple Windows operating systems using the Windows boot manager, boot into the newest version.

  2. Open an Administrator Command Prompt.

  3. The command to run depends on the type of legacy boot-up menu you want:

    1. If you have a single Windows operating system and want to enable pressing F8 at boot-up to access the Safe Mode menu, run the following command:

      bcdedit /set {default} bootmenupolicy legacy

      When booted to the legacy menu, select the Repair Your Computer option to boot to Windows RE. Once it has loaded, click Troubleshooting and then Advanced options to bring up the repair options.

    2. If you have multiple Windows operating systems installed or want the legacy boot menu to display on boot-up, run the following command:

      bcdedit /set {bootmgr} displaybootmenu yes

      This will make the legacy boot menu display on each boot-up without needing to press a key. The default OS will boot after the timeout period has expired. To access Windows RE you will need to highlight the desired Windows installation and then press F8. On the Startup Settings menu press F10 for more options and then press 1 (or F1) to launch the recovery environment. Next, click Troubleshooting and then Advanced options to bring up the repair options.

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8 windows recovery console

How to Access Advanced Startup Options in Windows 10 or 8

The Advanced Startup Options menu, available in Windows 10 and Windows 8, is the central fix-it location for the entire operating system.

From here you can access Windows diagnostic and repair tools like Reset This PC, System Restore, Command Prompt, Startup Repair, and much more.

It's also where you access Startup Settings, the menu that includes Safe Mode, among other startup methods that could help you access Windows 10 or 8 if it is having problems starting. In other words, Advanced Startup Options functions as the Windows 10/8 boot menu.

The Advanced Startup Options menu should appear automatically after two consecutive startup errors. However, if you need to open it manually, there are six different ways to do so.

The best way to decide which method to use is to base your decision on what level of access you have to Windows right now:

  • If Windows 10/8 starts normally: Use any method, but 1, 2, or 3 will be easiest.
  • If Windows 10/8 does not start: Use method 4, 5, or 6. Method 1 will also work if you can at least get to the Windows logon screen.

Time Required: Accessing ASO is easy and can take anywhere from a few seconds to a few minutes, depending on which method you use.

All of these means of getting to the Advanced Startup Options menu work equally well in any edition of Windows 10, Windows 8, or Windows unless noted otherwise.

Method 1: SHIFT + Restart

This is by far the easiest way to get this done. Just hold down either SHIFT key while selecting Restart, available from any Power icon.

Power icons are available throughout Windows 10 and Windows 8 as well as from the sign-in/lock screen.

All you do now is wait while the Advanced Startup Options menu opens!

This method doesn't seem to work with the on-screen keyboard. You'll need to have a physical keyboard connected to your computer or device to open it this way.

Method 2: Settings Menu

  1. In Windows 10, select the Start button, and then choose the settings button followed by Update & Security.

    In Windows 8, Swipe from the right to open the charms bar. Select Change PC settings. Choose Update and recovery from the list on the left (or General prior to Windows ).

  2. Choose Recovery from the list of options on the left.

  3. Locate Advanced startup, at the bottom of the list of options on your right.

  4. Select Restart now.

  5. Wait through the Please wait message until Advanced Startup Options opens.

Method 3: Shutdown Command

  1. Open Command Prompt.

    Another option is to open Run (use the WIN+R keyboard shortcut) if you can't get Command Prompt started for some reason, probably related to the issue you're having that has you here in the first place!

  2. Save any open files before continuing or you'll lose any changes you've made since your last save.

  3. Execute the shutdown command in the following way:

    shutdown /r /o

    To cancel the shutdown command once executed (like if you forgot to save your work!) execute shutdown /a in the same Command Prompt window.

  4. Select Close to the signoff warning message that appears a few seconds later.

  5. After several seconds, during which nothing seems to be happening, Windows will then close and you'll see a Please wait message.

  6. Wait just a few seconds more until the Advanced Startup Options menu opens.

Method 4: Boot From Your Windows 10/8 Installation Media

  1. Insert into your computer a Windows 10 or Windows 8 DVD or a flash drive with the Windows installation files on it.

    You can borrow someone else's disc (or other media) if you need to. You're not installing or reinstalling Windows, you're just accessing Advanced Startup Options—no product key or license breaking required.

  2. Boot from the disc or boot from the USB device, whatever your situation calls for.

  3. Select Next from the Windows Setup screen.

  4. Choose Repair your computer at the bottom of the window.

  5. Advanced Startup Options will start, almost immediately.

Method 5: Boot From a Windows 10/8 Recovery Drive

  1. Insert your Windows 10 or Windows 8 Recovery Drive into a free USB port.

  2. Boot your computer from the flash drive.

  3. On the Choose your keyboard layout screen, select U.S. or whatever keyboard layout you'd like to use.

  4. Advanced Startup Options will begin instantly.

Method 6: Boot Directly to Advanced Startup Options

  1. Start or restart your computer or device.

  2. Choose the boot option for System Recovery, Advanced Startup, Recovery, etc.

    On some Windows 10 and Windows 8 computers, for example, pressing F11 starts System Recovery.

    What this boot option is called is configurable by your hardware maker, so the options mentioned here are just some that we've seen or heard. Whatever the name, it should be clear that what you're about to do is a boot to the advanced recovery features included in Windows.

    The ability to boot directly to Advanced Startup Options isn't one that's available with a traditional BIOS. Your computer will need to support UEFI and then also be configured properly to boot directly to the ASO menu. Fortunately, this is very common these days.

  3. Wait for Advanced Startup Options to begin.

What About F8 and SHIFT+F8?

Neither F8 nor SHIFT+F8 is a reliable option for booting to the Advanced Startup Options menu. See How to Start Windows 10 or Windows 8 in Safe Mode for more on this.

If you need to access Advanced Startup Options, you can do so with any of the several methods listed above.

How to Exit Advanced Startup Options

Whenever you're finished using the ASO menu, you can choose Continue to restart your computer. Assuming it's working properly now, this will boot you back into Windows 10/8.

Your other option is Turn off your PC, which will do just that.

Thanks for letting us know!

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Repair Windows 8 using Automatic Repair

Recovery Console Infinite Loop: Fix for Windows Vista, 7, 8,

Get the fix for the endless recovery console loop for Windows Vista, Windows 7, Windows 8 and Windows .

This error prevents you from accessing anything on your computer and presents an endless loop of loading Recovery Console without end.

Contents

About &#;Recovery console in endless loop&#;

The following information on this error has been compiled by NeoSmart Technologies, based on the information gathered and reported by our global network of engineers, developers, and technicians or partner organizations.

Symptom 1: Computer attempts to enter Recovery Console continuously

Each time the PC is booted, the option known as &#;Repair Your Computer&#; from the Advanced Boot Options menu is always automatically selected and the PC will attempt to enter the Recovery Console but is unable to do so.

Symptom 2: The recovery console keeps launching in a loop

Every time an attempt is made to boot up Windows, the recovery console is started and attempts to solve the problems with the PC. The repair either exits unsuccessfully or claims to have succeeded but in reality the PC continues to not work and attempts to start the Recovery Console once more the next time it is booted.

Causes of this Error

This error has been known to occur as a result of one or more of the following:

Cause 1: Failed Automatic Update

Failed Windows Updates or Automatic Updates that involve an update or upgrade of the core Windows bootloader files (in particular, BOOTMGR) may result in the PC being unable to boot.

Cause 2: Out of date recovery console

On Windows 7 and above, the recovery console can be installed to the local partition by Microsoft Windows setup or by your PC&#;s computer manufacturer/OEM.

An out of date recovery console installed to the local disk may be unable to correct errors with a Windows installation that has been updated (either manually with hot fixes or automatically by Windows Update).

As a result, each time the recovery console is started, it cannot fix the issue and the infinite recovery console loop is presented.

Cause 3: Blue Screen of Death on reboot

It is possible that every other time Windows attempts to boot, a BSOD occurs. Recent versions of Windows are configured to hide this fact from the user and silently reboot.1

A BSOD during boot up will trigger a version of the Advanced Boot Options menu to be shown on next reboot, and if the recovery console is installed to the local disk, the default will be to highlight/select &#;Repair Your Computer&#; causing the endless loop of the recovery console.

Fix Infinite Loop of Recovery Console on Windows

Fix #1: Use Easy Recovery Essentials

Easy Recovery Essentials is guaranteed to fix the &#;endless repair computer loop&#; error automatically using its built-in Automated Repair option. EasyRE is currently available for Windows XP, Vista, 7 and 8 and can be downloaded and created on any PC.

  1. Download Easy Recovery Essentials. Make sure to note your Windows version (XP, Vista, 7 or 8) before you download EasyRE. This guide can help you identify what version of Windows you have installed.
  2. Burn the image. Follow these instructions on how to burn the bootable ISO image very carefully, as making a bootable CD can be tricky! Alternatively, these instructions explain how to create a bootable EasyRE recovery USB stick/drive.
  3. Boot up your PC from the Easy Recovery Essentials CD or USB you created.
  4. Once EasyRE is running, choose the &#;Automated Repair&#; option and click .
    EasyRE Home

    Choose &#;Automated Repair&#; in Easy Recovery Essentials

  5. After EasyRE scans your computer&#;s drives, identify and select the drive letter for your Windows installation from the list, and then click on the button to begin.
    EasyRE displays a list of found Windows operating systems

    Choose the drive associated with the Windows installation you&#;re trying to repair.

  6. Easy Recovery Essentials will start analyzing the selected drive for problems. EasyRE will test for and attempt to automatically correct errors with the disk, partition, bootsector, filesystem, bootloader, and registry. No intervention is required, as EasyRE&#;s repair is fully automated:
    EasyRE: Automated Repair

    Easy Recovery Essentials searches for errors and makes corrections to the selected Windows installation.

  7. Once the process is complete, EasyRE will report its findings. Click on the button to reboot your PC and test the changes.
  8. The &#;endless repair computer loop&#; error should now be fixed as your PC begins to load:
    EasyRE: Automated Repair

    Windows, booting up successfully.

You can download Easy Recovery Essentials from here.

Fix #2: Run Startup Repair from the Windows DVD

Windows Setup CD/DVD Required!
Some of the solutions below require the use of the Microsoft Windows setup CD or DVD. If your PC did not come with a Windows installation disc or if you no longer have your Windows setup media, you can use Easy Recovery Essentials for Windows instead. EasyRE will automatically find and fix many problems, and can also be used to solve this problem with the directions below.

The copy of the Recovery Console installed to your hard disk may be damaged or out of date and unable to fix your PC. It is possible to attempt the recovery from the copy of the recovery console on the Windows setup DVD instead.

Startup Repair is an automated diagnosis and repair tool that is available from the Windows setup disc and can be used to find and repair some common problems. More information about how Startup Repair operates and what it does can be found in our knowledgebase. The following steps will initiate Startup Repair from the Windows setup disc:

Unable to boot into the Windows setup CD?
See our guide on setting up a PC to boot from the CD or DVD for troubleshooting and more detailed instructions.

  1. Insert your Windows installation DVD into your PC&#;s CD-ROM drive,
  2. Fully power down your PC, and make sure it has fully shut off,
  3. Power up your PC,
  4. Press any key when you see &#;Press any key to boot from CD or DVD..&#;
  5. Click the link titled &#;Repair your computer&#; in the bottom-lefthand corner, after first selecting your language and keyboard options.
    Windows 7 setup Install Now dialog, with repair your computer link
  6. Wait for Startup Repair to scan your PC for Windows installations, then select your install from the list it shows:
    Startup repair lists available operating systems to repair.
  7. Choose &#;Startup Repair&#; from the list of available recovery options to begin:
    Startup Repair lists all available recovery options, choose a recovery tool
  8. Startup Repair will begin scanning your installation for known issues and will attempt a repair, if possible.
    Windows Startup Repair is searching for problems

Fix #3: Disable Automatic Restart

This option lets you get the exact and complete error message accompanying the Blue Screen of Death by disabling the Automatic Restart option of Windows. Note: this will not fix the boot error you are experiencing in and of itself, but should provide more information that may prove critical in solving the underlying problem.

The option to disable automatic restart on system failure is available from the Advanced Boot Options menu at startup. The instructions below will trigger this behavior, more detailed instructions on disabling automatic restart on system failure are also available in our knowledgebase.

  1. Restart your computer
  2. Wait for your BIOS to complete POST (the screen with your manufacturer logo and/or system information)
  3. Quickly begin tapping  repeatedly, until you see the list of boot options
  4. Choose &#;Disable automatic restart on system failure&#;
  5. Press  and wait for your PC to boot.

More Information

Linked Entries

Support Links

Applicable Systems

This Windows-related knowledgebase article applies to the following operating systems:

  • Windows Vista (all editions)
  • Windows 7 (all editions)
  • Windows 8 (all editions)
  • Windows (all editions)
  • Windows Server (all editions)
  • Windows Server (all editions)

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  1. In the experience of the researchers at NeoSmart Technologies, there is almost never a good reason for doing this. Microsoft is hoping that a reboot will fix your PC and so Windows decides to hide the blue screen and reboot, endlessly and in vain. A much more intelligent solution would be for Windows to keep track of whether or not this blue screen resulted in a silent and automatic reboot last time, and if so, show it so the user can see what&#;s going on. &#;

Sours: https://neosmart.net/wiki/recovery-console-loop/

You will also be interested:

System Recovery Options: Guide for Windows Vista, 7, 8, and 10

This article is about the System Recovery Options set of tools available in these Windows versions: Windows Vista, 7, 8, and

For Windows XP systems, please see the Recovery Console article instead.

Contents

These tools, grouped as System Recovery Options, can help you recover the Windows system from errors or restore your computer to a previous restore point.

System Recovery Options contains the following tools available:

  • Startup Repair. Startup Repair automatically scans your hard disk for errors and tries to fix the errors.
  • System Restore. System Restore can restore your computer to a previous restore point, if System Restore was enabled and a restore point was created.
  • Complete PC Restore or System Image Recovery. Complete PC Restore is available for Windows Vista systems (except the Windows Vista Home editions) and System Image Recovery is available for Windows 7 systems.
  • Windows Memory Diagnostic Tool. This tool scan your computer&#;s memory for errors.
  • Command Prompt. System Recovery Options allows you to access Command Prompt and run various command-line specific commands, such as bootrec or diskpart.

Depending on your Windows version, System Recovery Options can already be installed on your computer.

If these tools aren&#;t installed, you can access System Recovery Options with the original installation CD/DVD or USB (the media you used to install Windows). On most Windows 7 systems, these tools are already installed, while on Windows Vista systems are not.

To check if you have System Recovery Options installed, follow these following steps:

  1. Restart the computer
  2. As soon as your computer stars, press the key before the Windows logo appears
  3. When the Advanced Boot Options menu appears, check if you have a Repair your computer option listed:
  4. To continue, select Repair your computer and press
Advanced Boot Options on Windows 7

Advanced Boot Options on Windows 7

The System Recovery Options screen can also have manufacturer-specific tools that can help you recover or restore your computer.

For example, computers from Dell can have the Dell Backup and Recovery Manager tool installed:

Dell Backup and Recovery Manager

Toshiba users can have the TOSHIBA Recovery Wizard tool:

Toshiba Recovery Wizard

System Recovery Options in Windows Vista

Similarly to Windows 7, System Recovery Options can be accessed on a Windows Vista system with any of the following options:

Using Advanced Boot Options

To boot into the Advanced Boot Options menu, follow these steps:

  1. Restart your computer
  2. Press as soon as your computer starts to boot, but before the Windows Vista logo appears
  3. The Advanced Boot Options menu should now appear
  4. Select the Repair your computer option
  5. Press
  6. System Recovery Options should now be available (You may need to select your time, keyboard and language preferences before the list of tools is displayed)

Using the installation disc

If you still have the original Windows Vista disc, you can use it to access System Recovery Options:

  1. Restart the computer
  2. Insert the Windows Vista installation disc
  3. At the &#;Press any key to boot from CD or DVD&#;&#; screen, press any key to boot from the DVD
  4. Click Repair your computer at the Install Windows Vista screenInstall Windows Vista
  5. Choose the operating system from the list
  6. System Recovery Options is now available: (You may need to select the operating system from the presented list and click Next before the list of tools appears on your screen.)
Windows Vista Advanced Boot Options screen

Windows Vista Advanced Boot Options screen

System Recovery Options in Windows 7

To access System Recovery Options on a Windows 7 system, you have the following options:

  1. If the tools are installed on your PC, boot into Advanced Boot Options
  2. If you have the original installation CD/DVD, access the tools from the CD/DVD

Using Advanced Boot Options

To access System Recovery Options using Advanced Boot options, you need to have the tools installed on your hard disk. Follow these steps:

  1. Restart your computer
  2. Press before the Windows 7 logo appears
  3. At the Advanced Boot Options menu, select the Repair your computer option
  4. Press
  5. System Recovery Options should now be available
Windows 7 Advanced Boot Options screen

Windows 7 Advanced Boot Options screen

Using the installation disc

To access System Recovery Options using the original disc (installation CD or DVD), follow these steps:

  1. Boot from the Windows 7 installation DVD
  2. At the &#;Press any key to boot from CD or DVD&#;&#; message, press any key to boot from the DVD
  3. At the Install Windows screen, select a language, time and keyboard
  4. Click Next
  5. Click Repair your computer or press
  6. System Recovery Options is now available
Windows 7 Setup screen

Windows 7 Setup screen

System Recovery Options in Windows 8

On Windows 8 and , the System Recovery Options set of tools is no longer called System Recovery Options. The recovery tools are available under the Troubleshoot > Advanced Options panel.

Windows 8 Advanced Startup screen

Windows 8 Advanced Startup screen

You can perform these 2 actions that can help you recover the computer:

Other tools available, under the Advanced Options panel are:

  • System Restore
  • Command Prompt
  • System Image Recovery
  • Automatic Repair
  • UEFI Firmware Settings
  • Windows Startup Settings

If you can&#;t boot into Windows 8 to perform a Refresh or Restore, you need to use the original installation DVD or USB key:

  1. Insert the disc and restart your computer
  2. At the Windows Setup screen, click Next
  3. Click Repair your computer or press
Windows 8 Setup screen

Windows 8 Setup screen

If you don&#;t have the installation media, you can try the following (note that these methods can work on some computer models, not all computers with Windows 8):

  • Press as your computer boots
  • Press or + as your computer boots

Refresh

Refreshing your Windows 8 will not delete any of your personal files.

To perform a Refresh, follow these steps:

  1. Go to Settings either by swiping in from the right edge of the screen or by pointing the mouse in the upper-right corner of the screen so that the Settings panel appears
  2. Click Change PC Settings
  3. Click Update and recovery
  4. Click Recovery
  5. At the Refresh your PC without affecting your files section, click Get started
  6. Follow the instructions on the screen

If you can&#;t open the Settings panel, you can try this alternative:

  1. Log in Windows 8
  2. Hold the key
  3. Click Restart to restart the computer
Windows 8 Restart Menu

Windows 8 Restart Menu

Reset

Reseting your Windows 8 will delete all your personal files.

To perform a Reset, follow these steps:

  1. Go to Settings either by swiping in from the right edge of the screen or by pointing the mouse in the upper-right corner of the screen so that the Settings panel appears
  2. Click Change PC Settings
  3. Click Update and recovery
  4. Click Recovery
  5. Under the Remove everything and reinstall Windows section, click Get started
  6. Follow the instructions on the screen
Windows 8 Recovery Screen

Windows 8 Recovery Screen

If you can&#;t open the Settings panel, you can try this alternative:

  1. Log in Windows 8
  2. Hold the key
  3. Click Restart to restart the computer
Windows 8 Restart Menu

Windows 8 Restart Menu

Automatic Repair

To open Automatic Repair on a Windows 8 system, follow these steps:

  1. Boot into the recovery mode
  2. Click Troubleshooting
  3. Click Advanced Options
  4. Click Startup Repair
  5. Select the operating system
  6. Select the Administrator account, if prompted to do so
  7. Wait for the Automatic Repair process to finish
  8. Click Shut down or Advanced options, once the process is complete
Windows 8 Advanced Startup screen

Windows 8 Advanced Startup screen

System Recovery Options in Windows 10

Just like in Windows 10, the recovery tools in Windows 10 are available under the Troubleshoot > Advanced Options panel.

Windows 10 Advanced Startup screen

Windows 10 Advanced Startup screen

You can perform these 2 actions that can help you recover the computer:

Other tools available, under the Advanced Options panel are:

  • System Restore
  • Command Prompt
  • System Image Recovery
  • Automatic Repair
  • UEFI Firmware Settings
  • Windows Startup Settings

If you can&#;t boot into Windows 10 to perform a Refresh or Restore, you need to use the original installation DVD or USB key:

  1. Insert the disc and restart your computer
  2. At the Windows Setup screen, click Next
  3. Click Repair your computer or press
Windows 10 Setup screen

Windows 10 Setup screen

If you don&#;t have the installation media, you can try the following (note that these methods can work on some computer models, not all computers with Windows 10):

  • Press as your computer boots
  • Press or + as your computer boots

Refresh

Refreshing your Windows 10 will not delete any of your personal files.

To perform a Refresh, follow these steps:

  1. Go to Settings either by swiping in from the right edge of the screen or by pointing the mouse in the upper-right corner of the screen so that the Settings panel appears
  2. Click Change PC Settings
  3. Click Update and recovery
  4. Click Recovery
  5. At the Refresh your PC without affecting your files section, click Get started
  6. Follow the instructions on the screen
Windows 10 Recovery Screen

Windows 10 Recovery Screen

If you can&#;t open the Settings panel, you can try this alternative:

  1. Log in Windows 10
  2. Hold the key
  3. Click Restart to restart the computer
Windows 10 Restart Menu

Windows 10 Restart Menu

Reset

Reseting your Windows 10 will delete all your personal files.

To perform a Reset, follow these steps:

  1. Go to Settings either by swiping in from the right edge of the screen or by pointing the mouse in the upper-right corner of the screen so that the Settings panel appears
  2. Click Change PC Settings
  3. Click Update and recovery
  4. Click Recovery
  5. Under the Remove everything and reinstall Windows section, click Get started
  6. Follow the instructions on the screen
Windows 10 Recovery Screen

Windows 10 Recovery Screen

If you can&#;t open the Settings panel, you can try this alternative:

  1. Log in Windows 10
  2. Hold the key
  3. Click Restart to restart the computer
Windows 10 Restart Menu

Windows 10 Restart Menu

Automatic Repair

To open Automatic Repair on a Windows 10 system, follow these steps:

  1. Boot into the recovery mode
  2. Click Troubleshooting
  3. Click Advanced Options
  4. Click Startup Repair
  5. Select the operating system
  6. Select the Administrator account, if prompted to do so
  7. Wait for the Automatic Repair process to finish
  8. Click Shut down or Advanced options, once the process is complete
Windows 10 Advanced Startup screen

Windows 10 Advanced Startup screen

More Information

Support Links

Applicable Systems

This Windows-related knowledgebase article applies to the following operating systems:

  • Windows Vista (all editions)
  • Windows 7 (all editions)
  • Windows 8 (all editions)
  • Windows (all editions)
  • Windows 10 (all editions)

Propose an edit

Sours: https://neosmart.net/wiki/system-recovery-options/


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