Gucci song list

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Best Gucci Mane Songs of All Time – Top 10 Tracks

Gucci Mane Details

Electronic, Trap, Rap / Hip-Hop

Before achieving widespread success, most rappers are forced to endure a series of hardships. But few have gone through the same kind of trials and tribulations that Gucci Mane has. Despite the pitfalls, Gucci Mane takes each moment in stride, both playfully and insightful.

After building up a solid buzz in the South in the early 2000s thanks to the overwhelming success of his infectious 2003 club anthem, “Icy,” featuring fellow up-and-coming Southern rapper Young Jeezy, Gucci Mane caught an attempted murder charge during a much-publicized beef with Jeezy and had to serve a year in prison. Upon his return, he released his debut album, Trap House, his stellar sophomore project, Hard To Kill, and his 2007 major label debut, Back To The Trap House, before eventually being forced to serve another year-long prison sentence for a probation violation stemming from a 2005 incident.

But Gucci Mane wouldn’t let a second major legal battle stop his movement. Instead, he jumped into the studio for days at a time before his sentence started and recorded dozens of songs that he eventually released through his So Icey Entertainment and 1017 Brick Squad Records imprints while he was incarcerated to help keep his name alive in the streets. It worked, and by the time Gucci Mane was released in March 2009, his buzz was better than ever and he immediately started recording songs for what would become his second major label album, The State Vs. Radric Davis.

By late 2009, the album was finished. Featuring the smash singles, “Wasted,” and “Spotlight,” featuring Usher, The State Vs. Radric Davis was shaping up to be the biggest release of Gucci Mane’s career. While he had already enjoyed plenty of success in the South and routinely made thousands of dollars for performing at shows every night, the album was projected to move him into the upper echelon of rap. He looked like he was primed to end the year on a positive note. Unfortunately, he had one more hurdle to clear—and it was a big one.

In November 2009, just a few weeks before the album hit stores, Gucci Mane found himself getting thrown behind bars again for breaking the terms of his probation. It was devastating for his fans, his followers and, most importantly, himself. “Unfortunately, my incarceration also came at a pivotal point in my career, just as my first major label album was dropping,” Gucci Mane admitted later. “I was forced to miss what should have been one of the proudest moments of my life.”

He didn’t let those moments go to waste, though. While in prison serving a one-year sentence, Gucci Mane wrote rhymes constantly, stayed in touch with his Brick Squad affiliates Waka Flocka Flame and DJ Holiday and set the stage for his return by releasing an official mixtape, The Burrrprint 2 HD, in March, which moved more than 15,000 units in its’ first week in stores. All of this prepared Gucci Mane to get back on his grind when he released from prison in May.

And grind he did. He released several notable mixtapes, including Jewelry Selection hosted by DJ Holiday in August and Ferrari Music hosted by DJ Drama in September, toured the country and also completed The Appeal—his second major label album through So/Icey/Asylum/Warner Bros. Records. With the help of a strong first single, “Gucci Time,” featuring Swizz Beatz, and guest appearances from Ray J, Pharrell, Nicki Minaj, Wyclef and Bun B—as well as production efforts from Drumma Boy, Zaytoven, and the Neptunes—Gucci Mane proved that you might be able to lock him up, but you certainly can’t lock him down.

It wasn't before long, however, that Gucci Mane was back in infamy's unforgiving life. At the end of 2010 and beginning of the New Year, the rapper was involved in a series of well-publicized events including a relapse in his rehabilitation, being detained in a police raid, undergoing a psychiatric evaluation, and the acquisition of an uncanny face tattoo.

But it appears that Gucci Mane is now in a better place and is getting back to the music. On March 22, the Atlanta enigma will release the next chapter in his series of street albums titled The Return of Mr. Zone 6, which will be available on online music stores as well as in local retailers.

"This street album is a return to the music that got me buzzin' in the first place," expresses Gucci Mane. "It didn't really make sense to not have some of the people who've been responsible for some of my best street records behind me."

Gucci Mane teamed up with long-time collaborator Drumma Boy to produce the majority of the album with producers Southside and Zaytoven each contributing a song to the 13-track release. Features on the album include Brick Squad counterparts Waka Flocka Flame, OJ Da Juiceman, Cash Money’s Birdman, Wale, Master P, Webbie, 8ball, Rocko and Wooh the Kid.

“2009 was a great year. 2010 was a hell of a year. I’m hoping 2011 will be a hell of a great year. This project is going to set the tone for the new decade and I can’t wait for the feedback from the supporters, haters and everyone in between. I’m back, yall. BRRR!!!”

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Sours: https://app.discotech.me/articles/best-gucci-mane-songs-of-all-time-top-tracks

Gucci Mane discography

Hip hop recording artist discography

Gucci Mane discography
GucciMane2018.png

Gucci Mane performing in 2018

Studio albums25
Compilation albums9
EPs7
Singles99
Soundtrack albums1
Collaboration albums2
Mixtapes63
Promotional singles10

The discography of American rapper Gucci Mane consists of 25 studio albums, two collaborative albums, 9 compilation albums, one soundtrack, seven extended plays (EPs), 63 mixtapes and 99 singles (including 52 as a featured artist) and 10 promotional singles.

Albums[edit]

Studio albums[edit]

Compilation albums[edit]

Collaborative albums[edit]

Soundtracks[edit]

Mixtapes[edit]

Extended plays[edit]

Singles[edit]

As lead artist[edit]

As featured artist[edit]

Promotional singles[edit]

Other charted songs[edit]

Guest appearances[edit]

Music videos[edit]

As lead artist[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^"Icy" did not enter the Billboard Hot 100, but peaked at number five on the Bubbling Under Hot 100 Singles chart.[120]
  2. ^"Gucci Time" did not enter the Billboard Hot 100, but peaked at number four on the Bubbling Under Hot 100 Singles chart.[120]
  3. ^"1st Day Out Tha Feds" did not enter the Billboard Hot 100, but peaked at number eight on the Bubbling Under Hot 100 Singles chart.[120]
  4. ^"Guwop Home" did not enter the Billboard Hot 100, but peaked at number 23 on the Bubbling Under Hot 100 Singles chart.[120]
  5. ^"Guwop Home" did not enter the Hot R&B/Hip-Hop Songs chart, but peaked at number one on the Bubbling Under R&B/Hip-Hop Singles chart.[123]
  6. ^"No Sleep (Intro)" did not enter the Billboard Hot R&B/Hip-Hop Songs chart, but peaked at number four on the Bubbling Under R&B/Hip-Hop Singles chart.[123]
  7. ^"WayBach" did not enter the Billboard Hot R&B/Hip-Hop Songs chart, but peaked at number eight on the Bubbling Under R&B/Hip-Hop Singles chart.[123]
  8. ^"Bling Blaww Burr" did not enter the Billboard Hot R&B/Hip-Hop Songs chart, but peaked at number ten on the Bubbling Under R&B/Hip-Hop Singles chart.[123]
  9. ^"Last Time" did not enter the Hot R&B/Hip-Hop Songs chart, but peaked at number 48 on the Hot R&B/Hip-Hop Airplay chart.[124]
  10. ^"Drove U Crazy" did not enter the Billboard Hot 100, but peaked at number ten on the Bubbling Under Hot 100 Singles chart.[120]
  11. ^"Drove U Crazy" did not enter the Hot R&B/Hip-Hop Songs chart, but peaked at number four on the Bubbling Under R&B/Hip-Hop Singles chart.[123]
  12. ^"Tone It Down" did not enter the Billboard Hot 100, but peaked at number 16 on the Bubbling Under Hot 100 Singles chart.[120]
  13. ^"Tone It Down" did not enter the Billboard Hot R&B/Hip-Hop Songs chart, but peaked at number four on the Bubbling Under R&B/Hip-Hop Singles chart.[123]
  14. ^"Solitaire" did not enter the Billboard Hot 100, but peaked at number eight on the Bubbling Under Hot 100 Singles chart.[120]
  15. ^"Big Booty" did not enter the Billboard Hot 100, but peaked at number four on the Bubbling Under Hot 100 chart.[120]
  16. ^"Shit Crazy" did not enter the Billboard Hot 100, but peaked at number six on the Bubbling Under Hot 100 chart.[120]
  17. ^"Make tha Trap Say Aye" did not enter the Billboard Hot 100, but peaked at number 8 on the Bubbling Under Hot 100 Singles chart.[120]
  18. ^"Ridiculous" did not enter the Hot R&B/Hip-Hop Songs chart, but peaked at number four on the Bubbling Under R&B/Hip-Hop Singles chart.[123]
  19. ^"Sponsor" did not enter the Billboard Hot 100, but peaked at number 21 on the Bubbling Under Hot 100 Singles chart.[120]
Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gucci_Mane_discography
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10 Best Gucci Mane Songs

What a bizarre career Gucci Mane has strung together. He was one of the archetypical modern southern rappers, emerging from Atlanta in the waning eras of Outkast and Goodie Mob with a buzz saw, head-knock style that favored quicksilver synths and zonked, artificial bass. Gucci, alongside guys like T.I. and Lil Wayne, hijacked the spotlight from the hotbeds of Los Angeles and New York, causing an existential crisis from old head rap fans that hasn’t quite subsided to this day.

Naturally, it hasn’t all been easy. Gucci Mane has dealt with numerous legal issues in recent years, getting booked for violating probation in 2008, erratic driving in 2010, multiple assault charges while locked up in 2011 and gun charges in 2014. In the midst of the trouble he got his infamous ice cream face tattoo and starred in Harmony Korine's unforgettable “Spring Breakers.” Late last year, Gucci Mane was released from prison and promptly got back to work — releasing a mixtape and two studio albums as a free man in the waning months of 2016.

With weirdos like Rae Sremmurd and Young Thug keeping Atlanta on the map, it’s hard to look at Gucci Mane as anything but a hall of famer. He might have over a million songs to his name when he finally hangs up his mic, but in the meantime, here are our 10 favorite Gucci Mane songs.

10. “First Day Out Tha Feds”

On May 26, 2016, Gucci Mane was released from prison. The next day, in typically candid fashion, he released a single called “First Day Out Tha Feds.” “They called me crazy so much I think I’m starting to believe them, I did some things to some people that was downright evil.” Gucci Mane built a career by releasing a ton of great music in a short amount of time. At 36, he can still write, package and release an intimate rap song with only 24 hours notice. That’s a reassuring sign for the rest of his career.

9. “Pillz”

You don’t need anyone to explain to you what “Pillz” is about, but if you’re lost, it’s as simple as you think. "’Gucci, show time!’ Give me five more minutes, and a cold orange juice, cause I'm really really tripping.” The song was released on “Hard to Kill” back in 2006, a long time before Nicki Minaj, Trinidad James, Riff Raff and an entire generation of EDM, designer-drug influences emerged in rap music. Simply put, Gucci was rolling off beans long before it was en vogue. Like most things in modern hip-hop, Guwop did it first.

8. “Weird”

Gucci Mane has an interesting fixation on Christmas. In late 2016 he put out a record called “The Return of East Atlanta Santa,” which is itself a sequel to 2014’s “East Atlanta Santa.” He appeared — of course — in a santa suit with a silver glock. Years before either record, he released a song called “Weird” which repurposed public-access Christmas songs into trap anthems. “Diamonds same color as Santa Claus beard, ho ho ho I think Santa Claus here, dashing through the snow in my old Chevrolet.” Gucci Mane never lets common sense get in the way of a bad idea. Sometimes that’s disastrous (like his V-Nasty collaboration) but “Weird” is lovable, organic and uniquely him.

7. “My Shadow”

Gucci Mane has an unfair reputation of being a spotty technical rapper, much in the same way people claim Kurt Cobain wasn’t a great guitarist. If you’re one of the people who believes that Davis gets by on vibes instead of bars, go listen to “My Shadow” from “The Burrrrprint The Movie 3-D.” “I’m so icy veteran so you can’t say beginner’s luck, all my boys tote choppers so you best bet robbing armored trucks.” It’s got all the looney wordplay and casual sadism of Guwop’s best tracks, but presented in a more violent version of his trademark drawl. It brings to mind that time T-Pain dropped the autotune and slayed “Karaoke,” putting everyone on notice.

6. “Timothy”

Gucci Mane thrives in long, dadaist stretches of mixtape fury. The idea of him spending hours with a pencil and pad, bleeding over a track doesn’t quite feel right. He made himself famous through improvisation, but “Timothy” is an exception. It’s the most writerly song in Gucci Mane’s career. The titular character breaks into a car that belongs to a rival gangster, and the whole other side of the town is on his tail. By the third verse the money from the break-in is gone, the police are getting closer and Timothy has sunk into a constant paranoia. It’s a fairy tale directly from Gucci Mane’s perspective and fundamental proof that the man should be allowed to do whatever he wants.

5. "I'm a Star"

Lil Wayne was probably the guy who first broke ground on croaky, kush-stained mumble-rap, but Gucci Mane took the aesthetic into the stratosphere. “I’m a Star,” a glistening highlight from 2008 mixtape “The Movie,” is almost incomprehensible. A blizzard of high-treble synths join his giddy sestina of shout-outs and slurry southern slang. Eventually things clear out for one of the simplest (and most effective) hooks he’s ever laid to tape. “I’m a star, everything is up to par, girl look at my car.” There’s an inclination to highlight Gucci’s more serious work over erratic mixtape bangers like “I’m a Star,” but so much of the man’s appeal came from the blacked-out, stream-of-consciousness swagger that showed up on Datpiff every other month.

4. “Worst Enemy”

At this point it’s pretty clear that there’s a pretty big difference between Radric Davis and Gucci Mane. When he avoids the flexes and the id, Davis has always come off empathetic, cerebral and slightly tragic in interviews. That doesn’t shine through in his music all that often, but when it does it can be kind of revelatory. “Worst Enemy” is a downtempo moment on “The State vs. Radric Davis” that focuses squarely on the quiet moments in Gucci’s brain. “MJG said it best man will I ever know, who my friends through thick and thin, cause so called friends will turn to foes.”

3. “Lemonade”

There are better rappers, better producers and better hook writers than Gucci Mane, but nobody nails that low-rent, hyper addictive ringtone bleat that’s made his music so addictive, and so influential. “Lemonade” is his highest charting single, and perhaps the closest Gucci ever came to truly crossing over into Lil Wayne ubiquity. Bangladesh cues up some incessant, staccato pianos and a schoolyard trap chant and Guwop stumbles through his verses with that trademark laconic flow — half-asleep and still one of the best rappers in the world. “Lemonade” went nuclear when Gucci was caught in a wide variety of legal issues and put a grim, incarcerated photo of himself on his record covers. Seven years later, we’re still wondering what might’ve happened if his momentum wasn’t stunted.

2. “Beat it Up”

In the first verse Gucci Mane jumps out of bed and cooks up some scrambled eggs and filet mignon before liberally dousing himself with four-figure cologne. In the second verse he sneaks over to your house and puts your blanket in the washing machine before spending some quality time with your girlfriend. In the third verse he double-parks his Aston Martin and rhymes “second option” with “girlfriend watching.” Trey Songz croons a saccharine hook, but the focus is squarely on Gucci who is having the time of his life in the bars. Like so many other Gucci classics, “Beat it Up” was a mixtape flare that caught steam, and frankly we’re lucky to live in an era where artists routinely hand out guaranteed smashes for free.

1. “Wasted”

Blasé pop hedonism usually doesn’t require much critical thought, but that isn’t the case with “Wasted.” On the surface it’s about as crystal-clear as party jams go — Gucci Mane has spent a career telling us about the herculean amount of weed, pills and codeine he’s consumed — but here, there’s a slight tinge of melancholy. “Rock star lifestyle might don’t make it, living life high, everyday clique wasted.” You could hear that refrain at every blind-drunk frat party in the country in 2009, but if you were paying attention you’d realize that Gucci was describing a moment where he was losing vast swathes of his life to an endless cross-country delirium. That’s not supposed to be fun. The song is called “Wasted” for a reason.

Sours: https://www.redbull.com/us-en/best-gucci-mane-songs
Gucci Mane - Lemonade (Official Music Video)

Check out these 12 best Gucci Mane songs

What a bizarre career Gucci Mane has had. He was one of the archetypical modern southern rappers, emerging from Atlanta in the waning eras of Outkast and Goodie Mob with a buzz saw, head-knock style that favoured quicksilver synths and zonked, artificial bass. Gucci, alongside guys like T.I. and Lil Wayne, hijacked the spotlight from the hotbeds of Los Angeles and New York, causing an existential crisis from old head rap fans that hasn’t quite subsided to this day.

Naturally, it hasn’t all been easy. Gucci Mane (aka Radric Delantic Davis) has dealt with numerous legal issues in recent years, getting booked for violating probation in 2008, erratic driving in 2010, multiple assault charges while locked up in 2011 and gun charges in 2014. In the midst of the trouble he got his infamous ice cream face tattoo and starred in Harmony Korine's unforgettable “Spring Breakers.” In 2016, Gucci Mane was released from prison five months early and promptly got back to work — releasing a mixtape and two studio albums as a free man, and he's dedicated himself to being the hardest working mf in rap ever since.

With weirdos like Rae Sremmurd and Young Thug keeping Atlanta on the map, it’s hard to look at Gucci Mane as anything but a hall of famer. He might have over a million songs to his name when he finally hangs up his mic, but in the meantime, here are our favourites.

1. "Wasted"

Blasé pop hedonism usually doesn’t require much critical thought, but that isn’t the case with “Wasted.” On the surface it’s about as crystal-clear as party jams go — Gucci Mane has spent a career telling us about the herculean amount of weed, pills, and codeine he’s consumed — but here, there’s a slight tinge of melancholy. “Rock star lifestyle might don’t make it, living life high, everyday clique wasted.” You could hear that refrain at every blind-drunk frat party in the country in 2009, but if you were paying attention you’d realize that Gucci was describing a moment where he was losing vast swathes of his life to an endless cross-country delirium. That’s not supposed to be fun. The song is called “Wasted” for a reason.

2. “Beat it Up”

In the first verse Gucci Mane jumps out of bed and cooks up some scrambled eggs and filet mignon before liberally dousing himself with four-figure cologne. In the second verse he sneaks over to your house and puts your blanket in the washing machine before spending some quality time with your girlfriend. In the third verse he double-parks his Aston Martin and rhymes “second option” with “girlfriend watching.” Trey Songz croons a saccharine hook, but the focus is squarely on Gucci who is having the time of his life in the bars. Like so many other Gucci classics, “Beat it Up” was a mixtape flare that caught steam, and frankly we’re lucky to live in an era where artists routinely hand out guaranteed smashes for free.

3. “Lemonade”

There are better rappers, better producers, and better hook writers than Gucci Mane, but nobody nails that low-rent, hyper addictive ringtone bleat that’s made his music so addictive, and so influential. “Lemonade” is perhaps the closest Gucci ever came to truly crossing over into Lil Wayne ubiquity before his arrest. Bangladesh cues up some incessant, staccato pianos and a schoolyard trap chant and Guwop stumbles through his verses with that trademark laconic flow — half-asleep and still one of the best rappers in the world. “Lemonade” went nuclear when Gucci was caught in a wide variety of legal issues and put a grim, incarcerated photo of himself on his record covers. Seven years later, we’re still wondering what might’ve happened if his momentum wasn’t stunted.

4. “Worst Enemy”

At this point it’s pretty clear that there’s a pretty big difference between Radric Davis and Gucci Mane. When he avoids the flexes and the id, Davis has always come off empathetic, cerebral and slightly tragic in interviews. That doesn’t shine through in his music all that often, but when it does it can be kind of revelatory. “Worst Enemy” is a downtempo moment on “The State vs. Radric Davis” that focuses squarely on the quiet moments in Gucci’s brain. “MJG said it best man will I ever know, who my friends through thick and thin, cause so called friends will turn to foes.”

5. "I'm a Star"

Lil Wayne was probably the guy who first broke ground on croaky, kush-stained mumble-rap, but Gucci Mane took the aesthetic into the stratosphere. “I’m a Star,” a glistening highlight from 2008 mixtape “The Movie,” is almost incomprehensible. A blizzard of high-treble synths join his giddy sestina of shout-outs and slurry southern slang. Eventually things clear out for one of the simplest (and most effective) hooks he’s ever laid to tape. “I’m a star, everything is up to par, girl look at my car.” There’s an inclination to highlight Gucci’s more serious work over erratic mixtape bangers like “I’m a Star,” but so much of the man’s appeal came from the blacked-out, stream-of-consciousness swagger that showed up on Datpiff every other month.

6. “Timothy”

Gucci Mane thrives in long, dadaist stretches of mixtape fury. The idea of him spending hours with a pencil and pad, bleeding over a track doesn’t quite feel right. He made himself famous through improvisation, but “Timothy” is an exception. It’s the most writerly song in Gucci Mane’s career. The titular character breaks into a car that belongs to a rival gangster, and the whole other side of the town is on his tail. By the third verse the money from the break-in is gone, the police are getting closer and Timothy has sunk into a constant paranoia. It’s a fairy tale directly from Gucci Mane’s perspective and fundamental proof that the man should be allowed to do whatever he wants.

7. “My Shadow”

Gucci Mane has an unfair reputation of being a spotty technical rapper, much in the same way people claim Kurt Cobain wasn’t a great guitarist. If you’re one of the people who believes that Davis gets by on vibes instead of bars, go listen to “My Shadow” from “The Burrrrprint The Movie 3-D.” “I’m so icy veteran so you can’t say beginner’s luck, all my boys tote choppers so you best bet robbing armored trucks.” It’s got all the looney wordplay and casual sadism of Guwop’s best tracks, but presented in a more violent version of his trademark drawl. It brings to mind that time T-Pain dropped the autotune and slayed “Karaoke,” putting everyone on notice.

8. “Weird”

Gucci Mane has an interesting fixation on Christmas. In late 2016 he put out a record called The Return of East Atlanta Santa, the sequel to 2014’s East Atlanta Santa. On the cover he appeared — of course — in a santa suit with a silver glock. Years before either record, he released a song called “Weird” which repurposed public-access Christmas songs into trap anthems. “Diamonds same color as Santa Claus beard, ho ho ho I think Santa Claus here, dashing through the snow in my old Chevrolet.” Gucci Mane never lets common sense get in the way of a bad idea. Sometimes that’s disastrous (like his V-Nasty collaboration) but “Weird” is lovable, organic and uniquely him.

9. “Pillz”

You don’t need anyone to explain to you what “Pillz” is about— "’Gucci, show time!’ Give me five more minutes, and a cold orange juice, cause I'm really really tripping.” The song was released on “Hard to Kill” back in 2006, a long time before Nicki Minaj, Trinidad James, Riff Raff and an entire generation of EDM, designer-drug influences emerged in rap music. Simply put, Gucci was rolling off beans long before it was en vogue. Like most things in modern hip-hop, Guwop did it first.

10. “1st Day Out Tha Feds”

On May 26, 2016, Gucci Mane was released from prison. The next day, in typically candid fashion, he released a single called “First Day Out Tha Feds.” “They called me crazy so much I think I’m starting to believe them, I did some things to some people that was downright evil.” Gucci Mane built a career by releasing a ton of great music in a short amount of time. He can still write, package and release an intimate rap song with only 24 hours notice. That’s a reassuring sign for the rest of his career.

11. “I Get The Bag”

This riff on the Migos/Gucci collab and previous hit “Slippery” from 2017 builds on and refines what this group of Georgian powerhouses have done before. The song’s spacey synth lines and rumbling bass clear a wandering path for Gucci’s polished, effortless groove where he makes a strong case for why he’s still peerless after all these years: “Stop the comparin', y'all makin' me laugh.” The celebratory song gave Gucci his highest Billboard chart position yet, which he then later tied with the 2018 single “Wake Up In The Sky.”

12. “Big Booty”

One enduring quality about Gucci is that he knows his way around a hook -- it’s one of the many reasons he keeps getting the call to prop up other artist’s songs, from Big Boi’s “Shine Blockas” to Rae Sremmurd’s “Black Beatles.” This 2019 J. White Did It produced cut with Megan Thee Stallion is built on a Jimmy Smith sample also referenced in 2 Live Crew’s “Hoochie Mama.” As the warped guitar part locks into a steady funk, Gucci sets the tone with an infectious, playful chorus that bookends a simple but effective verse from Hot Girl Meg. Rather than try to compete with her or go head to head, he just foregrounds his guest’s performance with an infectious earworm that supports her performance.

Sours: https://www.redbull.com/ca-en/best-gucci-mane-songs

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