Dnd 5e bladesinger wizard

Dnd 5e bladesinger wizard DEFAULT

Bladesingers are elves who bravely defend their people and lands. They are elf wizards who master a school of sword fighting grounded in a tradition of arcane magic. In combat, a bladesinger uses a series of intricate, elegant maneuvers that fend off harm and allow the bladesinger to channel magic into devastating attacks and a cunning defense.

Styles of Bladesinging are broadly categorized based on the type of weapon employed, and each is associated with a category of animal. Within that style are specializations named after specific animal types, based on the types of spells employed, the techniques of the master, and the particular weapon used.

Styles that employ a sword belong to the Cat family, including the longsword-wielding Lion style and the scimitar-wielding Red Tiger style. Styles that focus on the use of hafted weapons belong to the Bird family, including the handaxe-throwing Eagle style or warpick-wielding Raven style. Styles that use whips, chains, or flails are included in the Snake style family, such as the whip-wielding Viper style.

Bladesingers who apprentice to a master typically get a tattoo of their chosen style's animal. Some bladesingers learn multiple styles and bear many tattoos, wearing a warning on their skin of their deadly skills.

Restriction: Elves Only

Only elves and half-elves can choose the bladesinger arcane tradition. In the world of Faerûn, elves closely guard the secrets of bladesinging.

Your DM can lift this restriction to better suit the campaign. The restriction reflects the story of bladesingers in the Forgotten Realms, but it might not apply to your DM's setting or your DM's version of the Realms.

Subclass Features

Training in War and Song

When you adopt this tradition at 2nd level, you gain proficiency with light armor, and you gain proficiency with one type of one-handed melee weapon of your choice.

You also gain proficiency in the Performance skill if you don't already have it.

Bladesong

Starting at 2nd level, you can invoke a secret elven magic called the Bladesong, provided that you aren't wearing medium or heavy armor or using a shield. It graces you with supernatural speed, agility, and focus.

You can use a bonus action to start the Bladesong, which lasts for 1 minute. It ends early if you are incapacitated, if you don medium or heavy armor or a shield, or if you use two hands to make an attack with a weapon. You can also dismiss the Bladesong at any time you choose (no action required).

While your Bladesong is active, you gain the following benefits:

  • You gain a bonus to your AC equal to your Intelligence modifier (minimum of +1).
  • Your walking speed increases by 10 feet.
  • You have advantage on Dexterity (Acrobatics) checks.
  • You gain a bonus to any Constitution saving throw you make to maintain your concentration on a spell. The bonus equals your Intelligence modifier (minimum of +1).

You can use this feature twice. You regain all expended uses of it when you finish a short or long rest.

Starting at 6th level, you can attack twice, instead of once, whenever you take the Attack action on your turn.

Song of Defense

Beginning at 10th level, you can direct your magic to absorb damage while your Bladesong is active. When you take damage, you can use your reaction to expend one spell slot and reduce that damage to you by an amount equal to five times the spell slot's level.

Song of Victory

Starting at 14th level, you add your Intelligence modifier (minimum of +1) to the damage of your melee weapon attacks while your Bladesong is active.

Sours: https://d-n-d5e.fandom.com/wiki/Bladesinger

Dungeons & Dragons: New Errata Make the Bladesinger SO Much Better

Changes to D&D's Bladesinger subclass elevate this sword-wielding spellcaster to the top of the list for flexibility and damage.

Wizards of the Coast releases Tasha's Cauldron of Everythingnext week, and in the days leading up to it, the Dungeons & Dragons team has been leaking bits what will constitute the largest rules expansion of Fifth Edition. Several changes have already been announced, including new rules for races, Unearthed Arcana subclasses made official and much more.

One of the subclasses receiving revision is the Wizard Bladesinger from the Sword Coast Adventurer's Guide. Many fans loved the idea of the Bladesinger but found it fell short of expectations. The subclass was basically exclusive to Elves and had more limited options than other builds that mixed martial and spellcasting prowess. With the newest errata published yesterday, however, the Bladesinger can stand alone as the flexible gish it was always intended to be.

Related: Dungeons & Dragons: 5 Online Tools DMs NEED

The basic problem with the original Bladesinger was that they could not stack their abilities very well. As Wizards, Bladesingers knew lots of spells, but most Wizard spells focus on area of effect damage and battlefield control. Those don't work well if your character is on the frontline trying to mix it up with the Barbarian and Fighter. Although Bladesingers could wear light armor and had a benefit to their armor class when activating their Bladesong, they could not combine their cantrips with their attacks in a single round.

A Bladesinger essentially had to choose whether to use two attacks or cast one cantrip for slightly higher damage, like Green-Flame Blade. Paladins, on the other hand, could make two attacks and use a Smite, giving them more flexibility with their abilities and much higher damage output. Eldritch Knight Fighters, another melee/caster build, include a feature at seventh level that allow them cast a cantrip and then make a melee attack. Players who loved the concept of Bladesingers rightly saw them as underpowered in comparison to the damage potential of the others.

The changes to both spells and the Bladesinger subclass announced yesterday eliminate that imbalance. First, these specialized wizards will be untied from the exclusive race of elf. Although the rules always stated that DMs could change the basic rule of elves only, the new rule will make that clearer.

Related: Dungeons & Dragons: 5 Support Caster Builds

Second, the subclass will be able to activate their Bladesong more often. Before, they could use the feature twice before a short or long rest. Now, they will have a number of uses equal to their proficiency bonus. This scales the ability up as players advance through the tiers of play, giving higher level players more choice over this ability. Tying the refresh of the ability to a long rest, on the other hand, promotes some rationing and strategic choice on the part of the player.

The biggest change is the addition of this line that follows the subclass' sixth level Extra Attack: "Moreover, you can cast one of your cantrips in place of one of those attacks." This is the kind of flexible action economy bladesingers were really designed for. As Wizards, it makes sense that they should have greater control over their spellcasting than Eldritch Knights, and now they do. The rule means that a Bladesinger can cast Green-Flame Blade or Booming Blade, then make their extra attack too. Or, they could cast True Strike to gain advantage on the second attack, and the list goes on. With the largest cantrip list in the game, these wizards will now have the flexibility they deserve.

KEEP READING: Dimension Brennan Lee Mulligan Returns to the Unsleeping City

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James Hanna (41 Articles Published)

A writer, editor, and designer of dungeons, James lives in Indianapolis with his wife, two cats, two dogs, and some mice in the walls. Before writing for CBR, he was a high school English teacher and editor for Booth, Butler University's literary journal. When he's not writing, James can be found rolling d20s with his friends on Discord.

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When building a bladesinging wizard in DnD 5e, consider the following features:

  • Try a high elf or feral tiefling build.
  • Wizard basics: Arcane Recovery, Spell Mastery, Signature Spells.
  • Bladesinging abilities: Bladesong, Training in War and Song…
  • Choose spells for swordplay: booming blade, green-flame blade
  • Multi-class potential: Battle Master, Swashbuckler, College of Swords

The bladesinging wizard in Dungeons and Dragons 5e mixes the study of magic with graceful swordplay.  This character is an intelligent fencer or noble, a class born of elves.  Therefore, I’ll have an opportunity to be a smug outcast or an honorable prince.  Either way, I’ll have the benefits of the wizard spell list and a roguish ability with the blade.

Try a high elf or feral tiefling build.

Because this wizard thrives on magic and maneuverability, I’ll want a race that adds Dexterity and Intelligent bonuses.

High elves come with a +2 Dexterity/+1 Intelligence ability score bonus and a handful of elvish abilities.  Fey Ancestry gives me advantage against being charmed and immunity to being put to sleep with magic.  Plus, I’ll get a bonus cantrip.  Naturally, I could roleplay this character as a noble.

On the other hand, feral tieflings also add a +2 Dexterity/+1 Intelligence ability score bonus, but with fiendish spells built in.  I’ll have Hellish Resistance (fire resistance), along with thaumaturgy, hellish rebuke (2d10 fire damage against foes who hit me) and darkness as I level up to 5.

Wizard basics: Arcane Recovery, Spell Mastery, Signature Spells.

Before I get into spells and swordplay, let’s take a look at basic wizard class features.

Arcane Recovery is a wizard ability that grants me some of my spent spell slots on a short rest.  The amount of spell slots I recover is equal to half my wizard level rounded up.  This ability comes at level 1.

However, the next wizard class ability, Spell Mastery, comes at level   Spell Mastery gives me a 1st-level and 2nd-level spell to cast for free once a day and always have prepared.

Finally, Signature Spells (level 20) gives me a free 3rd-level spell to cast for free once a day.

Bladesinging abilities: Bladesong, Training in War and Song…

At level 2, I truly begin my bladesinging journey with Training in War and Song and Bladesong.  Now, I’m transforming into much more of a magical swordfighter than a run-of-the-mill wizard in robes.

Training in War and Song gives me proficiency with light armor and one type of one-handed melee weapon of my choice.  Plus, I’ll gain proficiency in Performance if I don’t already have it.  As far as the weapon goes, I want to lean into my high Dexterity score and use a rapier or katana (finesse) for 1d8 piercing or slashing damage.

Then, Bladesong evokes an elven magic that grants me several benefits for 1 minute.  However, I can only use this ability an amount of times equal to my proficiency bonus.

  • I gain a bonus to my AC equal to my Intelligence modifier.
  • My walking speed increases by 10 feet.
  • I have advantage on Dexterity (Acrobatics) checks.
  • I gain a bonus to any Constitution saving throw I make to maintain my concentration on a spell.

By level 6, I’ll gain the fighter-like ability Extra Attack, giving me the ability to attack twice when I take the attack action.

Song of Defense (level 10) transforms spell slots into damage reduction.  Whenever I’m struck with an attack, I can spend one spell slot to reduce the damage by 5 X spell slot level.

Finally, Song of Victory (level 14) adds my Intelligence modifier to the damage of my melee weapon attacks while my Bladesong is active.

Choose spells for swordplay: booming blade, green-flame blade

Along with this bladesinging class, Tasha’s Cauldron of Everything introduces a number of spells that fit this build well.

Cantrips

Most of my unique sword spells come as cantrips.

  • Booming Blade: When I hit an opponent with a sword strike, an electric, booming energy covers their body. Until my next turn, they take 1d8 thunder damage if they move 5 feet.  When I reach level 5, I can add 1d8 extra thunder damage to the strike.  Both abilities increase in damage as I level further.
  • Green-Flame Blade: On a successful melee strike, I can deal extra fire damage to an adjacent opponent within 5 feet of the first.  At level 5 I deal extra 1d8 fire damage on a hit.  The fire damage also increases by 1d8 + Intelligence modifier for the 2nd  Again, both damage opportunities increase as I level.
  • Sword Burst: I create a circle of spectral blades that deal 1d6 force damage to enemies within 5 feet of me who fail a Dexterity saving throw.  This damage increases by 1d6 when I reach level 5, 11 and
  • Mage Hand: A spectral hand reaches out 30 feet to inspect objects, open doors, disarm or trigger traps and many other creative uses.

1st-level spells

With most of my cool sword moves out of the way, I can use 1st-level spells for ranged attacks and classic wizard options.

  • Chromatic Orb: Hurl a small orb or energy as a spell attack.  On a hit, the orb deals 3d8 damage of a type I choose (acid, fire, cold, thunder, lightning or poison).  Now, I have a versatile ranged attack for different foes.
  • Shield: As a reaction, I gain +5 to my AC until the start of my next turn. Plus, I’m immune to magic missile.  With a higher AC than most wizards, this effect will be incredibly useful.
  • Detect Magic: I can pick up on magical energies, knowing what direction they are coming from and what school they belong to.
  • Protection from Evil and Good: Touching a target, I cause protection against aberrations, celestials, elementals, fey, fiends, and undead.  These creatures have disadvantage on attacks against the target, and the target is immune to being charmed or frightened.

2nd-level spells

Again, I’ll tap into classic wizard favorites for my 2nd-level spells, with an added effect-based spell from Tasha’s Cauldron of Everything.

  • Misty Step: I can teleport up to 30 feet away in a cloud of silver mist.
  • Invisibility: Target I touch magically turns invisible for up to an hour.  The spell ends if the target attacks or casts a spell.
  • Tasha’s Mind Whip: Target within 90 feet must make an Intelligence saving throw or take 3d6 psychic damage.  Plus, the target can only move, take an action or take a bonus action (instead of all 3 per usual).

3rd-level spells

Now, I get to tap into summoning spells and effective counter-magic.

  • Counterspell: As a reaction, I can automatically counter 3rd-level spells and lower. Higher-level spells cause me to make an Intelligence check with a DC equal to 10 + spell’s level.
  • Dispel Magic: Choose a creature, object or magical effect.  Any spell of 3rd level or lower automatically ends on the target.  Again, I’ll need to make a successful Intelligence check with a DC equaling 10 + spell level.
  • Summon Fey: This fey spirit is armed with a shortsword and takes its turn directly after mine.  This shortsword attack roll equals my Intelligence modifier to hit, dealing 1d6 + 3 + spell’s level piercing damage + 1d6 force damage.  Plus, this little guy can teleport, gain advantage on attacks, charm enemies and cast magical darkness as bonus actions.

Multi-class potential: Battle Master, Swashbuckler, College of Swords

Because my primary sword abilities and spells come at level 2 for this class, I have a large amount of potential for multiclassing a unique sword fighter.

Three levels of the fighter class will give me the battle master subclass.  With this class, I can upgrade my armor, and gain Action Surge and Second Wind for added melee abilities.  Plus, I’ll be able to choose 3 maneuvers to add to my sword fighting prowess.  The maneuver I love the most is Riposte, which grants me a free attack against enemies who attack and miss me.

However, swashbuckling rogues can lean into Sneak Attack, Expertise and thieves’ tools for a cunning sword fighter.  Fancy Footwork grants me the ability to move out of melee range without taking an attack of opportunity.  Partner this ability with booming blade, and I can tempt enemies into chasing me and take thunder damage.  Plus, Rakish Audacity gives me Sneak Attack without the need for advantage—essentially adding tons of extra damage in an up-close sword fight—and a bonus to my Initiative equal to my Charisma modifier.  If another creature is within 5 feet of me, I’ll lose the Sneak Attack ability.  Therefore, this is more of a one-on-one situation.

Finally, the bard College of Swords gives me Bardic Inspiration dice to help friends with attack rolls, ability checks and saving throws.  Plus, I’ll gain Jack of All Trades and Expertise to boost my overall skills.  However, the College of Swords gives me the opportunity to use this Bardic Inspiration for special sword attacks called Blade Flourish.  Now, I’ll have options for Defensive Flourish, Slashing Flourish and Mobile Flourish with corresponding sword effects.

Categories Dungeons and Dragons 5e, Role PlayingTags character build, dnd 5e, sword, sword fighter, swordsman, wizardSours: https://genrebomb.com/bladesinging-wizard-dnd-5e/
How To Play A Bladesinger Wizard In Dungeons \u0026 Dragons 5e

Bladesinger 5e Guide

Update January 13, Made changes based on the Bladesinger errata from Tasha&#;s Cauldron of Everything

What is this guide?

This guide is meant as a deep dive into the Wizard Subclass, the Bladesinger. You can find a full overview of the Wizard class here: DnD 5e Wizard.

For our full class guides, we use the following color rating scheme:

  • Red isn’t going to contribute to the effectiveness of your character build at all
  • Orange is an OK option
  • Green is a good option
  • Blue is a great option, you should strongly consider this option for your character
  • Sky Blue is an amazing option. If you do not take this option your character would not be optimized

For our Subclass Guides, we focus mainly on the Blue and Sky Blue options and options that are different from the parent class&#; rating for races, backgrounds, and feats. This is to allow a streamlined view of the subclass&#;s features and because the other options are discussed in the 5e Wizard Guide or other Subclass Guides.

What is a Bladesinger?

Have you ever played a Wizard and thought to yourself, &#;Sometimes, I dream of charging into battle with the Fighters and Barbarians, laughing in the face of danger&#;? Enter the Bladesinger.

Well versed in both spell and sword, Bladesingers are suitable for many roles on the battlefield. Whether you want to focus on crowd control, damage, or pulling the enemy&#;s attention off of your weaker party members, the Bladesinger has you covered. At their core, they are still primarily Wizards, but they can also dish out some decent melee damage.

Strengths

Bladesingers keep up with the spellcasting prowess of just about any Wizard, with the added benefit of a melee weapon proficiency and greatly enhanced survivability. This opens up some very interesting ways to build and play the class, since Bladesingers can easily boost their AC into the 20s. Combined with some defensive spells and great mobility, the Bladesinger can whip around the battlefield untouched.

All in all, Bladesingers are a unique take on the Wizard class and are a blast to play. While many subclasses of the Wizard feel &#;samey&#;, the Bladesinger breathes new life into one of D&D&#;s most iconic classes.

Weaknesses

Bladesingers are cool, but they definitely are not the strongest or most optimized Wizard subclass. Most Wizards are only concerned with raising their INT score, ensuring that you can raise your other stats to a comfortable level. As a Bladesinger, you will need to have a good DEX score in addition to INT for boosts to AC and attacks. When enemies are more consistently getting through your AC, especially at higher levels, the low hit points of the Bladesinger can become a liability.

Unfortunately, casting spells or cantrips is still usually just better than attacking with a weapon for this character. More often than not, using your proficient weapon is more of a last resort than a go to option if you want to play optimally.

Before You Start

Races

With the release of Tasha&#;s Cauldron of Everything, it has been confirmed that even non-elf races can become Bladesingers! 

Check out our Guide to DnD Races for non-standard races. Keep in mind, most races and subraces are limited by the setting and source material chosen by the DM. Below are some of the best options for Bladesingers from the standard races.

Elf: Elves get +2 to DEX, ideal for this subclass.

  • High Elf: A boost to INT and a free cantrip. This is the perfect race for a Bladesinger.
  • Wood Elf: No INT score increase, but extra walking speed is interesting and synergizes well with the Bladesinger&#;s heightened mobility.

Gnome: As with any Wizard build, the +2 to INT goes a long way in making you a good spellcaster.

  • Forest Gnome: In addition you now get a DEX boost and Minor Illusion for free. On par with the High Elf if your DM allows it.

Variant Human: It&#;s no surprise that Variant Humans are good for Bladesingers. The Variant Human allows you to pump INT and DEX and get a feat right from level 1. Unlike most Wizards, feats are actually quite synergistic with the Bladesinger.

Backgrounds

There really isn&#;t a &#;best&#; background for the Bladesinger; anything that works well for other Wizard builds will suffice. Choose something that works for your backstory and comes with INT or DEX proficiencies.

  • Acolyte: Insight and Religion proficiency. Additional languages can come in handy.
  • Cloistered Scholar: History and Arcana, Nature, or Religion proficiency. Additional languages can come in handy.
  • Sage: Arcana and History proficiency. Additional languages can come in handy.

Ability Scores

Ability Score Increases (ASI) at 4th, 8th, 12th, 16th, and 19th level.

Most Wizards can get away with only focusing on INT, but as a Bladesinger you will want a high DEX bonus as well. INT is still definitely the most important stat to pump because Bladesingers get an ability that allows them to add INT to their AC and their concentration checks made to maintain a concentration spell. At later levels, they are also able to add the INT modifier to melee weapon attacks.

Due to these changes, Bladesingers are Multi Ability Dependent (MAD). Allocating stats properly is imperative to make the build useable, so some stats need to be dumped. Our suggestion is to pump ability scores in the following order: INT > DEX > CON.

STR: Dump and focus on other stats.

DEX: You want high AC and will want to choose a finesse weapon to attack with, so DEX is pretty much on par with INT for Bladesingers.

CON: Bladesingers will never have a large pool of hit points due to the Wizard&#;s poor hit dice, but when enemies break through your AC you don&#;t want to die in one hit.

INT: Wizards rely on INT do to everything, and INT bonuses pump you in additional ways with the Bladesinger&#;s features.

WIS: Can help with WIS saves and Perception.

CHA: Dump and focus on other stats.

Bladesinger Class Progression

1st Level

Hit Points: Wizards get the worst hit dice in the game, a d6. This is going to be a huge problem for Bladesingers if they start trying to tank hits without access to defensive magic.

Saves: Intelligence and Wisdom saves aren&#;t going to offer a whole lot of protection in melee situations.

Proficiencies: Typically, Wizards get no armor and very few weapon proficiencies. The Bladesinger&#;s Training in War and Song features adds light armor and proficiency with one type of one-handed melee weapon of your choice which is a very welcome addition.

Skills: You get proficiency in Performance in addition to the Wizard&#;s mediocre skills, which usually isn&#;t that useful, but especially so as you will likely dump CHA.

Spellcasting: Because of your high INT score, you won&#;t face the same issues as Eldritch Knights will when picking spells. Eldritch Knights are a Fighter subclass that is sort of the reverse option to Bladesingers when it comes to a melee spellcaster. EKs are also massively MAD and have a hard time pumping their INT score because they focus on their STR and CON. This means EKs have to stick to mainly defensive spells and spells that won&#;t force a save or use their spell attack modifier.

On the other hand, Bladesingers have a great INT score but will be hard-pressed to pump their CON to a reasonable level to make up for their lacking hit dice. We have included some of the best spells to take as a Bladesinger under the Example Bladesinger Build section that will help keep you alive, while still rolling out maximum damage and battlefield control.

Arcane Recovery: Refer to the 5e Wizard Guide.

2nd Level

Arcane Tradition: Bladesinging

Source: Tasha&#;s Cauldron of Everything

Training in War and Song: Proficiency in Performance may be useless, but proficiency in light armor and a one-handed melee weapon is what sets the Bladesinger apart from the other Wizard subclasses. Studded Leather won&#;t be quite as effective as Mage Armor, but saves a spell slot and a prepared spell for something more useful. At higher levels, when you have more spell slots to work with and a +5 to DEX, Mage Armor will outshine any Light Armor enough to be worth using.

Bladesong: Pairs nicely with Training in War and Song. Bladesong gives you a whole bunch of buffs while lasting for a whole minute. Because the number of uses (with the release of Tasha&#;s Cauldron of Everything) now scales with your proficiency bonus and is only reset with a long rest, it is weaker than it used to be at low levels and much better at a high level. The bonus to AC and CON saves to maintain concentration is especially spicy if you cast Haste on yourself.

6th Level

Extra Attack: The most notable update to the Bladesinger subclass is the change to Extra Attack. Having the choice to use a cantrip in the place of one of your attacks is really cool and can be combined in interesting and powerful ways. You could choose to replace one attack with Booming Blade or Green-Flame Blade, thereby still getting in two attacks for the round. Or, if you finished off your opponent with your first sword attack, you still have the option to shoot a Fire Bolt at an enemy further away. 

10th Level

Song of Defense: Song of Defense is another way to keep your squishy Bladesinger alive. If an incoming attack would cut through your Shield spell, this will at least reduce the damage.

14th Level

Song of Victory: At 20 INT and if both your weapon attacks connect this is an extra 10 damage. Not overly impressive, but anything to make your melee attacks more viable is a welcome addition.

18th Level

Spell Mastery: Refer to the 5e Wizard Guide.

20th Level

Signature Spells: Refer to the 5e Wizard Guide.

Feats

Bladesingers should consider feats more strongly than other Wizard builds, even though they depend on multiple ability scores. Several feats work very well with this subclass.

  • Elven Accuracy: Elven Accuracy is a good choice, especially if the +1 to DEX or INT gets you to the next modifier bonus. Combined with Shadow Blade and a dark environment, this feat will ensure that you nearly always connect with your target. As far as covering the Bladesinger&#;s weaknesses, namely dealing with getting hit in melee range, Mobile and War Caster will help you handle incoming attacks better.
  • Mobile: Mobile is really interesting if you want to play primarily in melee range. Combined with Bladesong your walking speed will be insane, and avoiding opportunity attacks is perfect for a character with such low hit points.
  • Spell Sniper: Solid way to increase range on your attack roll spells, especially those in melee range. Also lets you pick up an attack cantrip if you still need one, like Booming Blade or Green-Flame Blade.
  • War Caster: War Caster combined with Bladesong can ensure that you basically never drop your concentration on a spell. Casting spells with opportunity attacks is just great if you want to spend time in melee range.

Example Bladesinger Build

This build focuses on survivability, melee combat, and the crowd control abilities available to the Wizard. It can hold its own in melee combat at early levels, but will start to slow down in the late game without a multiclass. Purchase your light armor and chosen one-handed melee weapon at the earliest convenience. Dump the light armor in favor of the Mage Armor spell when your DEX bonus is high enough to make a big difference.

1st Level:

  • Race: High Elf
  • Background: Sage
  • Ability Scores (Point Buy): STR 8, DEX 14 (+2), CON 14, INT 15 (+1), WIS 12, CHA 8
  • Skill Proficiencies: Arcana, History, Insight, Perception, Performance, Religion
  • Equipment: Dagger, spellbook, component pouch, scholar&#;s pack
  • Cantrips: Booming Blade, Fire Bolt, Mage Hand, Minor Illusion
  • Spells: Expeditious Retreat, Find Familiar, Magic Missile, Mage Armor, Shield, Thunderwave
  • Spellcasting, Arcane Recovery

2nd Level:

  • Spells: Absorb Elements, Detect Magic
  • Arcane Tradition: Bladesinger
  • Training in War and Song, Bladesong

3rd Level:

  • Spells: Mirror Image, Misty Step

4th Level:

  • Spells: Blur, Scorching Ray
  • Cantrip: Green-Flame Blade
  • Feat: Mobile

5th Level:

6th Level:

  • Spells: Counterspell, Hypnotic Pattern
  • Extra Attack

7th Level:

  • Spells: Banishment, Greater Invisibility

8th Level:

  • Spells: Arcane Eye, Dimension Door
  • ASI: +2 DEX (DEX 18)

9th Level:

  • Spells: Hold Monster, Steel Wind Strike

10th Level:

  • Spells: Rary&#;s Telepathic Bond, Wall of Force
  • Cantrip: Mending
  • Song of Defense

11th Level:

  • Spells: Chain Lightning, Contingency

12th Level:

  • Spells: Disintegrate, Mass Suggestion
  • ASI: +2 DEX (DEX 20)

13th Level:

  • Spells: Plane Shift, Simulacrum

14th Level:

  • Spells: Forcecage, Teleport
  • Song of Victory

15th Level:

16th Level:

  • Spells: Feeblemind, Sunburst
  • ASI: +2 INT (INT 18)

17th Level:

  • Spells: Wish + your choice

18th Level:

  • Spells: Your choice
  • Spell Mastery: Absorb Elements and Misty Step

19th Level:

  • Spells: Your choice
  • ASI: INT + 2 (INT 20)

20th Level:

  • Spells: Your choice
  • Signature Spells: Counterspell and Haste

Hope you liked the guide! If you have any questions or feel like we missed something for the Bladesinger, go ahead and post a comment below. If you like our content subscribe to Arcane Eye!

Roland Drews

Roland Drews is a content creator and editor at Arcane Eye. When he isn't watching basketball or noodling on his guitar, you can find Roland reading, writing, or playing D&D. He currently lives in Bonn, Germany with his girlfriend Jess.

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5e wizard dnd bladesinger

Sources: Tasha's Cauldron of Everything

Training in War and Song

When you adopt this tradition at 2nd level, you gain proficiency with light armor, and you gain proficiency with one type of one-handed melee weapon of your choice.

You also gain proficiency in the Performance skill if you don’t already have it.

Bladesong

Starting at 2nd level, you can invoke an elven magic called the Bladesong, provided that you aren’t wearing medium or heavy armor or using a shield. It graces you with supernatural speed, agility, and focus.

You can use a bonus action to start the Bladesong, which lasts for 1 minute. It ends early if you are incapacitated, if you don medium or heavy armor or a shield, or if you use two hands to make an attack with a weapon. You can also dismiss the Bladesong at any time (no action required).

While your Bladesong is active, you gain the following benefits:

  • You gain a bonus to your AC equal to your Intelligence modifier (minimum of +1)
  • Your walking speed increases by 10 feet.
  • You have advantage on Dexterity (Acrobatics) checks.
  • You gain a bonus to any Constitution saving throw you make to maintain your concentration on a spell. The bonus equals your Intelligence modifier (minimum of +1).

You can use this feature a number of times equal to your proficiency bonus, and you regain all expended uses of it when you finish a long rest.

Extra Attack

Starting at 6th level, you can attack twice, instead of once, whenever you take the Attack action on your turn. Moreover, you can cast one of your cantrips in place of one of those attacks.

Song of Defense

Beginning at 10th level, you can direct your magic to absorb damage while your Bladesong is active. When you take damage, you can use your reaction to expend one spell slot and reduce that damage to you by an amount equal to five times the spell slot's level.

Song of Victory

Starting at 14th level, you can add your Intelligence modifier (minimum of +1) to the damage of your melee weapon attacks while your Bladesong is active.

Sours: http://dnd5e.wikidot.com/wizard:bladesinging
Wield Might and Magic as a Bladesinger Wizard│D\u0026D 5E

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