Rob wittman

Rob Wittman

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Rob Wittman, a Republican, represents Virginia's first 1st Congressional District, which stretches from Newport News to some outlying Norther Virginia preincts. Wittman worked for 20 years at the Virginia Department of Health as an environmental health specialist and as field director for the Division of Shellfish Sanitation. He served on the Montross Town Council from 1986 to 1996 and on the Westmoreland County Board of Supervisors from 1996 to 2005. He was elected to the Virginia House of Delegates in 2005. Two years later, he won a special election to Congress following the death of Rep. Jo Ann Davis, a Republican. Wittman holds a B.S. in biology from Virginia Tech, a Master's degree in public health from the University of North Carolina and a Ph.D. in public policy and administration from Virginia Commonwealth University.

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Rob Wittman

Virginia politician

Robert Joseph Wittman[1] (born February 3, 1959) is an American politician serving as the U.S. Representative for Virginia's 1st congressional district since 2007. The district stretches from the fringes of the Washington suburbs to the Hampton Roads area. He is a member of the Republican Party.[2]

Early life, education and career[edit]

Wittman was born in Washington, D.C., the son of adoptive parents Regina C. (née Wood) and Frank Joseph Wittman. His father was of German descent and his mother's ancestors included immigrants from Ireland and Canada.[3] He grew up in Henrico County, Virginia. He attended Virginia Tech as a member of the Corps of Cadets and Army ROTC and studied biology. While at Virginia Tech, he spent the summers working at a tomato cannery and on a fishing vessel. Also while in college, Wittman was a member of the Delta Tau Delta fraternity. He earned a master's degree in public health from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 1990 and a Ph.D. from Virginia Commonwealth University in 2002.[4] Wittman worked for 20 years with the Virginia Department of Health. He served as an environmental health specialist and was field director for the Division of Shellfish Sanitation.[5]

Wittman served on the Montross Town Council from 1986 to 1996 and as mayor of the Town of Montross from 1992 to 1996. Two of his major accomplishments in this office were the overhaul of the sewage system and the development of a computerized system for tax billing. From 1996 to 2005, Wittman served on the Westmoreland County Board of Supervisors, the last two years as chair. He helped create new libraries and pushed for raises in teacher salaries.

Virginia House of Delegates[edit]

In 2005, Wittman was elected to the Virginia House of Delegates, representing the 99th district. He served on the Agricultural; Chesapeake and Natural Resources; and Police and Public Safety Committees.

U.S. House of Representatives[edit]

Committee assignments[edit]

Caucus memberships[edit]

Political positions[edit]

In 2010, Wittman's stated platforms included support for corporate tax cuts, expanding broadband, and cutting spending.[12] He cosponsored legislation that would place a 2-year moratorium on capital gains and dividends taxes, cut the payroll tax rate and the self-employed tax rate in half for two years, and reduce the lowest income brackets by 5% each. He also favors deregulation.[12]

Wittman co-sponsored a personhood bill in Congress that defined life as beginning at conception.[13]

In 2012, Wittman said he would consider cutting pay and benefits for service members who join the military in the future in order to avoid closing bases or cutting the number of military personnel.[14]

Wittman authored the Chesapeake Bay Accountability and Recovery Act, designed "to enhance coordination, flexibility and efficiency of restoration efforts," according to Wittman.[15] After several senators sponsored a bill to reauthorize the North American Wetlands Conservation Act, Wittman introduced a version of the bill for House members to consider.[16] He proposed the Advancing Offshore Wind Production Act (H.R. 1398), which he said was designed to simplify the process companies must go through to test and develop offshore wind power.[17]

Immigration[edit]

Wittman has said the "immigration system is broken. To keep America strong and prosperous, we need an immigration system that works for the American people."[18] He supports ending chain migration, implementing e-verify, eliminating the visa-lottery system, funding a southern border wall, increased border security and immigration enforcement, and revision of legal immigration.[19] During the 115th Congress, Wittman voted to provide $1.6 billion for border security measures to enforce existing immigration laws, and The Project Safe Neighborhoods Grant Program Authorization Act.[19]

In November 2018, Wittman said that "85 percent [of immigrants] don’t show up for a scheduled court hearing or call to schedule a court hearing." PolitiFact found that his claim was false. Wittman said he got the information from Representative Bob Goodlatte, who in turn said he got it from the conservative website Newsmax, which attributed the claim to an anonymous "senior Los Angeles County Sheriff’s detective".[20]

Health care[edit]

Wittman opposes the Affordable Care Act and has voted to repeal it.[21] He said that Congress should not merely be "anti-Obamacare" and that Congressional Republicans are ready to provide alternatives if it is deemed unconstitutional.[22] In 2017, he voted for the American Health Care Act, which would have repealed and replaced the ACA.[22]

Texas v. Pennsylvania[edit]

In December 2020, Wittman was one of 126 Republican members of the House of Representatives to sign an amicus brief in support of Texas v. Pennsylvania, a lawsuit filed at the United States Supreme Court contesting the results of the 2020 presidential election, in which Joe Biden defeated[23] incumbent Donald Trump. The Supreme Court declined to hear the case on the basis that Texas lacked standing under Article III of the Constitution to challenge the results of an election held by another state.[24][25][26]

House SpeakerNancy Pelosi issued a statement that called signing the amicus brief an act of "election subversion." She also reprimanded Wittman and the other House members who supported the lawsuit: "The 126 Republican Members that signed onto this lawsuit brought dishonor to the House. Instead of upholding their oath to support and defend the Constitution, they chose to subvert the Constitution and undermine public trust in our sacred democratic institutions."[27][28] New Jersey Representative Bill Pascrell, citing section three of the 14th Amendment, called for Pelosi to not seat Wittman and the other Republicans who signed the brief supporting the suit, arguing that "the text of the 14th Amendment expressly forbids Members of Congress from engaging in rebellion against the United States. Trying to overturn a democratic election and install a dictator seems like a pretty clear example of that."[29]

[edit]

On January 6, 2021, Wittman was one of the 147 Republican members of the U.S. Congress who objected to certifying the 2020 presidential election.[30] He voted against certifying Pennsylvania's electors "after a day of violence as the U.S. Capitol was breached by Trump supporters who disrupted proceedings" despite no clear evidence of widespread voter fraud.[31]

Political campaigns[edit]

2005[edit]

Wittman was first elected to the Virginia House of Delegates over Democrat Linda M. Crandell.

2007[edit]

Wittman was reelected to the Virginia House of Delegates unopposed.

See also: 2007 Virginia's 1st congressional district special election

On December 11, 2007, Wittman was first elected to the United States Congress to succeed the late Congresswoman Jo Ann Davis, who died in October 2007. He was heavily favored in the special election due to the 1st's heavy Republican bent; it has been in Republican hands since 1977.[32] The Independent candidate was Lucky Narain.

2008[edit]

See also: 2008 United States House of Representatives elections in Virginia § District 1

Wittman was elected to his first full term, defeating Democratic nominee Bill Day and LibertarianNathan Larson.[33]

2010[edit]

See also: 2010 United States House of Representatives elections in Virginia § District 1

Wittman was reelected, defeating Democratic nominee Krystal Ball and Independent Green candidate Gail Parker.

2012[edit]

See also: 2012 United States House of Representatives elections in Virginia § District 1

Wittman was reelected, defeating Democratic nominee Adam Cook and Independent Green candidate Gail Parker.[22]

2014[edit]

See also: 2014 United States House of Representatives elections in Virginia § District 1

Wittman defeated Democratic nominee Norm Mosher, Libertarian Xavian Draper, and Independent Green Gail Parker.[34]

2016[edit]

See also: 2016 United States House of Representatives elections in Virginia § District 1

Wittman defeated Democratic nominee Matt Rowe and Independent Green candidate Gail Parker.[35]

2018[edit]

See also: 2018 United States House of Representatives elections in Virginia § District 1

Wittman defeated Democratic nominee Vangie Williams.[36] With the Republicans losing their remaining seat based in the Washington suburbs, as well as seats in Hampton Roads and the Richmond suburbs, Wittman was left as the only Republican holding a seat east of Charlottesville.

2020[edit]

See also: 2020 United States House of Representatives elections in Virginia § District 1

Wittman defeated Democratic nominee Qasim Rashid.[37]

Electoral history[edit]

Year Republican Votes Pct Democrat Votes Pct 3rd Party Party Votes Pct
2007Rob Wittman42,772 61% Philip Forgit 26,282 37% Lucky Narain Independent1,253 2%
2008Rob Wittman203,839 57% Bill Day 150,432 42% Nathan LarsonLibertarian5,265 1%
2010Rob Wittman135,564 64% Krystal Ball73,824 35% Gail Parker Independent Green2,544 1%
2012Rob Wittman200,845 56% Adam M. Cook 147,036 41% Gail Parker Independent Green8,308 2% [40]
2014Rob Wittman131,861 62.9% Norm Mosher 72,059 34.4% Gail Parker Independent Green5,097 2.4% [41]
2016Rob Wittman230,213 59.8% Matt Rowe 140,785 36.6% Gail Parker Independent Green12,866 3.3% [42]
2018Rob Wittman183,250 55.2% Vangie A. Williams 148,464 44.7% [43]
2020Rob Wittman260,614 58.2% Qasim Rashid186,923 41.7% [44]

Personal life[edit]

Wittman is a member of St. James Episcopal Church in Montross.[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^"Representative Robert Joseph Wittman (Rob) (R-Virginia, 1st) - Biography from LegiStorm". Retrieved 5 January 2016.
  2. ^"America's First District - U.S. House of Representatives". wittman.house.gov. Retrieved 6 May 2017.
  3. ^"Rob Wittman ancestry". Retrieved January 5, 2016.
  4. ^ ab"Rob Wittman". dela.state.va.us. Retrieved June 13, 2014.
  5. ^"About Rob". Rob Wittman. Archived from the original on June 14, 2014. Retrieved June 14, 2014.
  6. ^"Members". House Baltic Caucus. Retrieved 21 February 2018.
  7. ^"Members". Congressional Constitution Caucus. Retrieved 8 May 2018.
  8. ^"Our Members". U.S. House of Representatives International Conservation Caucus. Retrieved 5 August 2018.
  9. ^"Congressional Shipbuilding Caucus | U.S. Representative Rob Wittman".
  10. ^http://coausphs.org/awards/congressional-public-health-leadership/[bare URL]
  11. ^"Member List". Republican Study Committee. Retrieved 22 January 2018.
  12. ^ abhttp://www.robwittmanforcongress.com/on-the-issues.htm[bare URL]
  13. ^Davis, Chelyen (October 9, 2012). "Federal debt a focus of 1st District debate". fredericksburg.com. Archived from the original on June 15, 2014. Retrieved June 13, 2014.
  14. ^"GOP chairman on cutting future troops' benefits: 'I think that is a place we can go'". Military Times. Archived from the original on 22 November 2013. Retrieved 5 January 2016.
  15. ^"WITTMAN CHESAPEAKE BAY LEGISLATION PASSES THE HOUSE". wittman.house.gov. February 6, 2014. Archived from the original on June 13, 2014. Retrieved June 13, 2014.
  16. ^"Senate Bill Pushes for Wetlands Conservation Act Reauthorization". floridasportsman.com. April 2, 2012. Retrieved June 13, 2014.
  17. ^Wittman, Rob (March 26, 2013). "Wittman Introduces Renewable Energy Legislation". votesmart.org. Retrieved June 13, 2014.
  18. ^"Immigration".
  19. ^ ab"Immigration | U.S. Representative Rob Wittman".
  20. ^"Rep. Rob Wittman says 85 percent of immigrants skip their court hearings". @politifact. Retrieved 2019-06-09.
  21. ^Writer, By James Ivancic Times Staff. "Rep. Rob Wittman holds town hall in Nokesville". Prince William Times. Retrieved 2019-06-09.
  22. ^ abc"Hope for Congress?". Fredericksburg. May 4, 2012. Retrieved May 27, 2012.
  23. ^Blood, Michael R.; Riccardi, Nicholas (December 5, 2020). "Biden officially secures enough electors to become president". AP News. Archived from the original on December 8, 2020. Retrieved December 12, 2020.
  24. ^Liptak, Adam (2020-12-11). "Supreme Court Rejects Texas Suit Seeking to Subvert Election". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on December 11, 2020. Retrieved 2020-12-12.
  25. ^"Order in Pending Case"(PDF). Supreme Court of the United States. 2020-12-11. Archived(PDF) from the original on December 11, 2020. Retrieved December 11, 2020.
  26. ^Diaz, Daniella. "Brief from 126 Republicans supporting Texas lawsuit in Supreme Court". CNN. Archived from the original on December 12, 2020. Retrieved December 11, 2020.
  27. ^Smith, David (2020-12-12). "Supreme court rejects Trump-backed Texas lawsuit aiming to overturn election results". The Guardian. Retrieved 2020-12-13.
  28. ^"Pelosi Statement on Supreme Court Rejecting GOP Election Sabotage Lawsuit" (Press release). Speaker Nancy Pelosi. December 11, 2020. Retrieved December 13, 2020.
  29. ^Williams, Jordan (2020-12-11). "Democrat asks Pelosi to refuse to seat lawmakers supporting Trump's election challenges". TheHill. Archived from the original on December 12, 2020. Retrieved 2020-12-12.
  30. ^Yourish, Karen; Buchanan, Larry; Lu, Denise (2021-01-07). "The 147 Republicans Who Voted to Overturn Election Results". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 2021-01-07.
  31. ^Coghill Jr, Taft (2021-01-07). "Wittman votes against certifying Pennsylvania electors". The Free Lance-Star. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 2021-01-07.
  32. ^Giroux, Greg (December 11, 2007). "Republican Wittman Wins Virginia House Seat in Special Election". CQ Politics. Archived from the original on November 29, 2008. Retrieved March 7, 2010.
  33. ^"District Detail: VA-01". Congressional Quarterly. Retrieved March 7, 2010.
  34. ^"US Rep. Rob Wittman wins GOP primary in Virginia". WTOP. 10 June 2014. Retrieved January 5, 2016.
  35. ^"Rep. Rob Wittman wins re-election in 1st District". Richmond Times-Dispatch. 8 November 2016. Retrieved February 7, 2017.
  36. ^"Virginia's 1st Congressional District election, 2018". Ballotpedia. Retrieved 2021-02-01.
  37. ^"Virginia's 1st Congressional District election, 2020". Ballotpedia. Retrieved 2021-02-01.
  38. ^"Election Statistics". Office of the Clerk of the House of Representatives. Archived from the original on 2007-07-25. Retrieved 2010-12-23.
  39. ^"Election results". Virginia State Board of Elections. Archived from the original on 2010-06-17. Retrieved 2010-12-23.
  40. ^Virginia State Board of Elections. "Election Results: Member of House of Representatives (01)". November 2012 General Election Official Results. Virginia.gov. Archived from the original on 12 May 2013. Retrieved 18 January 2013.
  41. ^Virginia State Board of Elections. "Election Results: Member of House of Representatives (01)". November 2014 General Election Official Results. Virginia.gov. Retrieved 7 February 2017.
  42. ^Virginia State Board of Elections. "Election Results: Member of House of Representatives (01)". November 2016 General Election Official Results. Virginia.gov. Retrieved 7 February 2017.
  43. ^Virginia State Board of Elections. "Election Results: Member of House of Representatives". Virginia.gov.
  44. ^"2020 November General". results.elections.virginia.gov. Retrieved 2021-02-01.

External links[edit]

Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rob_Wittman
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Key votes: 115th Congress, 2017-2018

For detailed information about each vote, click here.

114th Congress

CongressLogo.png

The first session of the 114th Congress enacted into law six out of the 2,616 introduced bills (0.2 percent). Comparatively, the 113th Congress had 1.3 percent of introduced bills enacted into law in the first session. In the second session, the 114th Congress enacted 133 out of 3,159 introduced bills (4.2 percent). Comparatively, the 113th Congress had 7.0 percent of introduced bills enacted into law in the second session.[44][45] For more information pertaining to Wittman's voting record in the 114th Congress, please see the below sections.[46]

Economic and fiscal

Trade Act of 2015
See also: The Trans-Pacific Partnership trade deal, 2015

Trade adjustment assistance
Nay3.png On June 12, 2015, the House rejected the trade adjustment assistance (TAA) measure in HR 1314—the Trade Act of 2015—by a vote of 126-302. Trade adjustment assistance (TAA) is a federal program providing American workers displaced by foreign trade agreements with job training and services. The measure was packaged with trade promotion authority (TPA), also known as fast-track authority. TPA is a legislative procedure that allows Congress to define "U.S. negotiating objectives and spells out a detailed oversight and consultation process for during trade negotiations. Under TPA, Congress retains the authority to review and decide whether any proposed U.S. trade agreement will be implemented," according to the Office of the United States Trade Representative. Wittman was one of 158 Republicans to vote against TAA.[47][48]
Trade promotion authority
Nay3.pngOn June 12, 2015, the House passed the trade promotion authority (TPA) measure in HR 1314—the Trade Act of 2015—by a vote of 219-211. TPA gives the president fast-track authority to negotiate trade agreements sent to Congress without the opportunity for amendment or filibuster. Although the House approved TPA, it was a largely symbolic vote given the measure was part of a package trade bill including trade adjustment assistance (TAA), which was rejected earlier the same day. Wittman was one of 54 Republicans to vote against the measure.[49][50]
Trade promotion authority second vote
Nay3.png After the trade adjustment assistance (TAA) and trade promotion authority (TPA) did not pass the House together on June 12, 2015, representatives voted to authorize TPA alone as an amendment to HR 2146—the Defending Public Safety Employees' Retirement Act—on June 18, 2015. The amendment passed by a vote of 218-208, with all voting members of the House maintaining their original positions on TPA except for Ted Yoho (R-Fla.). Wittman was one of 50 Republicans to vote against the amendment.[51][52]
Trade adjustment assistance second vote
Nay3.png The House passed HR 1295—the Trade Preferences Extension Act of 2015—on June 25, 2015, by a vote of 286-138. The Senate packaged trade adjustment assistance (TAA) in this bill after the House rejected the TAA measure in HR 1314—the Trade Act of 2015. Along with trade promotion authority (TPA), which Congress passed as part of HR 2146—the Defending Public Safety Employees' Retirement Act—TAA became law on June 29, 2015. Wittman was one of 132 Republicans to vote against HR 1295.[53][54]

Defense spending authorization

Yea3.png On May 15, 2015, the House passed HR 1735—the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2016—by a vote of 269-151. The bill "authorizes FY2016 appropriations and sets forth policies for Department of Defense (DOD) programs and activities, including military personnel strengths. It does not provide budget authority, which is provided in subsequent appropriations legislation." Wittman voted with 227 other Republicans and 41 Democrats to approve the bill.[55] The Senate passed the bill on June 18, 2015, by a vote of 71-25. President Barack Obamavetoed the bill on October 22, 2015.[56]

Yea3.png On November 5, 2015, the House passed S 1356—the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2016—by a vote of 370-58. The second version of the $607 billion national defense bill included $5 billion in cuts to match what was approved in the budget and language preventing the closure of the Guantanamo Bay military prison.[57][58] Wittman voted with 234 other Republicans and 135 Democrats to approve the bill.[59] On November 10, 2015, the Senate passed the bill by a vote of 91-3, and President Barack Obama signed it into law on November 25, 2015.[60]

2016 Budget proposal

Yea3.png On April 30, 2015, the House voted to approve SConRes11, a congressional budget proposal for fiscal year 2016, by a vote of 226-197. The non-binding resolution was designed to create 12 appropriations bills to fund the government. All 183 Democrats who voted, voted against the resolution. Wittman voted with 225 other Republicans to approve the bill.[61][62][63]

2015 budget

Nay3.png On October 28, 2015, the House passed HR 1314—the Bipartisan Budget Act of 2015—by a vote of 266-167. The bill increased military and domestic spending levels and suspended the debt ceiling until March 2017.[64] Wittman voted with 166 Republicans against the bill.[65] It passed the Senate on October 30, 2015.[66] President Barack Obama signed it into law on November 2, 2015.

Foreign Affairs

Iran nuclear deal
See also: Iran nuclear agreement, 2015

Yea3.png On May 14, 2015, the House approved HR 1191—the Iran Nuclear Agreement Review Act of 2015—by a vote of 400-25. The bill required President Barack Obama to submit the details of the nuclear deal with Iran for congressional review. Congress had 60 days to review the deal and vote to approve, disapprove, or take no action on the deal. During the review period, sanctions on Iran could not be lifted. Wittman voted with 222 other Republicanrepresentatives to approve the bill.[67][68]


Approval of Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action
Nay3.png On September 11, 2015, the House rejected HR 3461—To approve the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action, signed at Vienna on July 14, 2015, relating to the nuclear program of Iran—by a vote of 162-269. The legislation proposed approving the nuclear agreement with Iran. Wittman voted with 243 Republicans and 25 Democrats against the bill.[69][70]


Suspension of Iran sanctions relief
Yea3.png On September 11, 2015, the House approved HR 3460—To suspend until January 21, 2017, the authority of the President to waive, suspend, reduce, provide relief from, or otherwise limit the application of sanctions pursuant to an agreement related to the nuclear program of Iran—by a vote of 247-186. HR 3460 prohibited "the President, prior to January 21, 2017, from: limiting the application of specified sanctions on Iran or refraining from applying any such sanctions; or removing a foreign person (including entities) listed in Attachments 3 or 4 to Annex II of the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPA) from the list of designated nationals and blocked persons maintained by the Office of Foreign Asset Control of the Department of the Treasury." Wittman voted with 244 Republicans and two Democrats for the bill.[71][72]


Presidential non-compliance of section 2
Yea3.png On September 10, 2015, the House passed H Res 411—Finding that the President has not complied with section 2 of the Iran Nuclear Agreement Review Act of 2015—by a vote of 245-186. Section 2 of the Iran Nuclear Agreement Review Act of 2015 required the president to submit all materials related to the nuclear agreement for congressional review. House Republicans introduced the resolution because two agreements between the International Atomic Energy Agency and Iran were not submitted to Congress. Wittman voted with 244 Republicans for the resolution.[73][74]

Export-Import Bank

Nay3.png On October 27, 2015, the House passed HR 597—the Export-Import Bank Reform and Reauthorization Act of 2015—by a vote of 313-118. The bill proposed reauthorizing the Export-Import Bank and allowing it to resume offering assistance in the form of loans and insurance to foreign companies that wanted to buy U.S. goods.[75] Wittman voted with 116 Republicans and one Democrat against the bill.[76]

Domestic

USA FREEDOM Act of 2015

Yea3.png On May 13, 2015, the House passed HR 2048—the Uniting and Strengthening America by Fulfilling Rights and Ensuring Effective Discipline Over Monitoring Act of 2015 or the USA FREEDOM Act of 2015—by a vote of 338-88. The legislation revised HR 3199—the USA PATRIOT Improvement and Reauthorization Act of 2005—by ending the bulk collection of metadata under Sec. 215 of the act, requiring increased reporting from the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court, and requiring the use of "a specific selection term as the basis for national security letters that request information from wire or electronic communication service providers, financial institutions, or consumer reporting agencies." Wittman voted with 195 Republicans and 142 Democrats to approve the legislation. It became law on June 2, 2015.[77][78]

Pain-Capable Unborn Child Protection Act

Yea3.png On May 13, 2015, the House passed HR 36—the Pain-Capable Unborn Child Protection Act—by a vote of 242-184. The bill proposed prohibiting abortions from being performed after a fetus was determined to be 20 weeks or older. The bill proposed exceptions in cases of rape, incest, or to save the life of the mother. Wittman voted with 237 Republicans in favor of the bill.[79][80]

Cyber security

Yea3.png On April 23, 2015, the House passed HR 1731—the National Cybersecurity Protection Advancement Act of 2015—by a vote of 355-63. The bill proposed creating an information sharing program that would allow federal agencies and private entities to share information about cyber threats. It also proposed including liability protections for companies.[81] Wittman voted with 219 Republicans and 135 Democrats to approve the bill.[82]

Yea3.png On April 22, 2015, the House passed HR 1560—the Protecting Cyber Networks Act—by a vote of 307-116.[83] The bill proposed procedures that would allow federal agencies and private entities to share information about cyber threats. Wittman voted with 201 Republicans and 105 Democrats in favor of the bill.[84]

Immigration

Yea3.png On November 19, 2015, the House passed HR 4038—the American SAFE Act of 2015—by a vote of 289-137.[85] The bill proposed instituting additional screening processes for refugees from Iraq and Syria who applied for admission to the U.S. Wittman voted with 241 Republicans and 47 Democrats in favor of the bill.[86]

113th Congress

The second session of the 113th Congress enacted into law 224 out of the 3215 introduced bills (7 percent). Comparatively, the 112th Congress had 4.2 percent of introduced bills enacted into law in the second session.[87] For more information pertaining to Wittman's voting record in the 113th Congress, please see the below sections.[88]

National security

NDAA

Yea3.png Wittman voted in support of HR 1960 - the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2014. The bill passed the House on June 14, 2013, with a vote of 315 - 108. Both parties were somewhat divided on the vote.[89]

DHS Appropriations

Yea3.png Wittman voted in support of HR 2217 - the DHS Appropriations Act of 2014. The bill passed the House on June 6, 2013, with a vote of 245 - 182 and was largely along party lines.[89]

Keystone Pipeline Amendment

Nay3.pngWittman voted in opposition of House Amendment 69, which would have amended HR 3 to "require that the Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration, in consultation with the Department of Homeland Security, conduct a study of the vulnerabilities of the Keystone XL pipeline to a terrorist attack and certify that necessary protections have been put in place." The amendment failed on May 22, 2013, with a vote of 176 - 239 and was largely along party lines.[89]

CISPA (2013)

Yea3.png Wittman voted in support of HR 624 - the CISPA (2013). The bill passed the House on April 18, 2013, with a vote of 288 - 127. The bill permitted federal intelligence agencies to share cybersecurity intelligence and information with private entities and utilities.[90] The bill was largely supported by Republicans, but divided the Democratic Party.[89]

Economy

Farm bill

Yea3.png On January 29, 2014, the U.S. House approved the Federal Agriculture Reform and Risk Management Act of 2013, H.R. 2642, also known as the Farm Bill.[91] The bill passed by a vote of 251-166. The nearly 1,000-page bill reformed and continued various programs of the Department of Agriculture through 2018. The $1 trillion bill expanded crop insurance for farmers by $7 billion over the next decade and created new subsidies for rice and peanut growers that would kick in when prices drop.[92][93] It also cut the food stamp program an average of $90 per month for 1.7 million people in 15 states.[93] Wittman voted with 161 other Republicanrepresentatives in favor of the bill.

2014 Budget

Yea3.png On January 15, 2014, the Republican-run House approved H.R. 3547, a $1.1 trillion spending bill to fund the government through September 30, 2014.[94][95] The House voted 359-67 for the 1,582-page bill, with 64 Republicans and three Democrats voting against the bill.[95] The omnibus package included 12 annual spending bills to fund federal operations.[96] It increased the paychecks of federal workers and military personnel by 1 percent, increased Head Start funding for early childhood education by $1 billion, reduced funding to the Internal Revenue Service and the Environmental Protection Agency, and protected the Affordable Care Act from any drastic cuts. Wittman voted with the majority of the Republican Party in favor of the bill.[94]

Government shutdown
See also: United States budget debate, 2013

Yea3.png On September 30, 2013, the House passed a final stopgap spending bill before the shutdown went into effect. The bill included a one-year delay of the Affordable Care Act's individual mandate and would have also stripped the bill of federal subsidies for congressional members and staff. It passed through the House with a vote of 228-201.[97] At 1 a.m. on October 1, 2013, one hour after the shutdown officially began, the House voted to move forward with going to a conference. In short order, Sen. Harry Reid rejected the call to conference.[98] Wittman voted to approve the stopgap spending bill that would have delayed the individual mandate.[99]

Yea3.png The shutdown ended on October 16, 2013, when the House took a vote on HR 2775 after it was approved by the Senate. The bill to reopen the government lifted the $16.7 trillion debt limit and funded the government through January 15, 2014. Federal employees also received retroactive pay for the shutdown period. The only concession made by Senate Democrats was to require income verification for Obamacare subsidies.[100] The House passed the legislation shortly after the Senate, by a vote of 285-144, with all 144 votes against the legislation coming from Republican members. Wittman voted for HR 2775.[101]

Wittman said via Twitter that he would "donate my salary to charity for every day the government is shut down."[102]

Farm Bill
See also: United States Farm Bill 2013

Yea3.png Wittman supported the Farm Bill on July 11, 2013. The bill passed in a 216-208 vote.[103] The bill passed included farm policy, but did not include food stamps.[104]

Immigration

Morton Memos Prohibition

Yea3.png Wittman supported House Amendment 136 - Prohibits the Enforcement of the Immigration Executive Order. The amendment was adopted by the House on June 6, 2013, with a vote of 224 - 201. The purpose of the amendment as stated on the official text is to "prohibit the use of funds to finalize, implement, administer, or enforce the Morton Memos." These memos would have granted administrative amnesty to certain individuals residing in the United States without legal status.[105] The vote largely followed party lines.[106]

Healthcare

Repealing Obamacare

Yea3.png Wittman supported all attempts to repeal or delay the implementation of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act.[107]

Social issues

Abortion

Yea3.png Wittman supported HR 1797 - Pain-Capable Unborn Child Protection Act. The resolution passed the House on June 18, 2013, with a vote of 228 - 196. The purpose of the bill was to ban abortions that would take place 20 or more weeks after fertilization.[108]

Government affairs

HR 676
See also: Boehner's lawsuit against the Obama administration

Yea3.png On July 30, 2014, the U.S. House approved a resolution 225 to 201 to sue President Barack Obama for exceeding his constitutional authority. Five Republicans—Thomas Massie of Kentucky, Paul Broun of Georgia, Scott Garrett of New Jersey, Walter Jones of North Carolina and Steve Stockman of Texas—voted with Democrats against the lawsuit.[109] Wittman joined the other 224 Republicans in favor of the lawsuit. All Democrats voted against the resolution.[110][111]

Previous congressional sessions

Fiscal cliff

Nay3.png Wittman voted against the fiscal cliff compromise bill, which made permanent most of the Bush tax cuts originally passed in 2001 and 2003, while also raising tax rates on the highest income levels. He was one of 151 Republicans that voted against the bill. The bill was passed in the House by a 257 - 167 vote on January 1, 2013.[112]

Sours: https://ballotpedia.org/Rob_Wittman

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