New marvel tv shows 2016

New marvel tv shows 2016 DEFAULT

From Blockbuster Films to Obscure Shows and Docs, Here’s All the Marvel Content on Disney+

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Covid has undeniably changed both the TV and theatrical release game for Marvel Studios, with dozens of titles featuring Earth’s mightiest heroes have been brought to streaming, and a massive catalogue of Marvel content landing exclusively on Disney+.

From Saturday-morning cartoons, to the latest installments from the Marvel Cinematic Universe, Disney+ has quickly become the exclusive home to Marvel TV shows and movies that cater to fans both new and old.

Studio chief Kevin Feige announced at the Disney Investors Day presentation last year, that 2021 would see massive releases on Disney+, especially with the studio taking the reins on producing new original TV content. The last few months of 2021 will also see movies that premiered simultaneously in theaters and for Premier Access available to all subscribers, like Black Widow, which drops Wednesday, October 6.

This moves comes after Scarlett Johansson and Disney settled a breach of contract lawsuit over Black Widow, according to the The Hollywood Reporter. The actress claimed she lost out on potential box office profits from Disney’s decision to stream Black Widow on Disney+ simultaneously with the theatrical release. It’s unclear how long Disney will continue this dual-release model, but for now, Disney+ has the highly-anticipated Hawkeye series coming up, as well as a trove of existing Avengers and MCU content all in one place.

How Can I Watch Disney+ Online Free?

If you want to get up to speed on the most important Marvel storylines, or jump straight into watching Black Widow online, it’s easy to sign up for a Disney+ subscription. Disney+ subscribers can watch it on-demand from their TV, laptop, tablet, phone, or gaming console.

A monthly subscription to Disney+ will get you all the ad-free content at just $7.99 a month. You can save yourself some cash when you sign up for a year-long plan instead at $79.99 (about a $14 discount). Hulu, Disney+ and ESPN+ have also teamed up to offer a bundle deal that gets you access to all three streamers for just $13.99 a month.

If you are a Verizon subscriber, you may be eligible for their “Disney+ on Us” deal, which gets you six months of Disney+ for free. Get the deal or see if your current Verizon plan qualifies here, which will let you stream Black Widow on Disney+ for free. Watch all the MCU movies and series all in one place, including Avengers: Infinity War, plus offerings from Pixar, Star Wars, National Geographic, and more.

Marvel's Captain America: Civil WarL to R: Falcon/Sam Wilson (Anthony Mackie), Ant-Man/Scott Lang (Paul Rudd), Hawkeye/Clint Barton (Jeremy Renner), Captain America/Steve Rogers (Chris Evans), Scarlet Witch/Wanda Maximoff (Elizabeth Olsen) and Winter Soldier/Bucky Barnes (Sebastian Stan)Photo Credit: Film Frame© Marvel 2016

Marvel Studios/Disney+

What Marvel Movies Are Currently Available on Disney+?

Before you stream Black Widow, you can re-watch all the other Marvel movies currently available on Disney+. As far as recommended viewing order goes, we suggest you watch the Marvel Cinematic Universe films in the order they were originally released in theaters, which is the order we’ve listed below. Yes, we know it isn’t technically chronological—Captain Marvel takes place in the nineties and is the first canonical appearance of Nick Fury, while Captain America: The First Avenger is set during Steve Rogers service in World War II. But nearly every title should be watched in order, (with the exception of films that are not currently released on Disney+, since they were produced by a different studio.)

  • Iron Man (2008)
  • Iron Man 2 (2010)
  • Thor (2011)
  • Captain America: The First Avenger (2011)
  • The Avengers (2012)
  • Iron Man 3 (2013)
  • Thor: The Dark World (2013)
  • Captain America: The Winter Soldier (2014)
  • Guardians of the Galaxy (2014)
  • Avengers: Age of Ultron (2015)
  • Ant-Man (2015)
  • Captain America: Civil War (2016)
  • Doctor Strange (2016)
  • Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 (2017)
  • Thor: Ragnarok (2017)
  • Black Panther (2018)
  • Avengers: Infinity War (2018)
  • Ant-Man and the Wasp (2018)
  • Captain Marvel (2019)
  • Avengers: Endgame (2019)
  • Black Widow (2021)

NOT CURRENTLY ON DISNEY+:The Incredible Hulk (2008), Spider-Man: Homecoming (2017), Spider-Man: Far from Home (2019). Those films are streaming on Amazon.

Even though it’s not currently on the site, we don’t recommend skipping the latest Spider-Man films if you want to follow the overarching plot going into Phase Four of the MCU—everything post-Avengers: Endgame and Spider-Man: Far From Home.

Which 20th Century Fox Marvel Movies Are Available on Disney+? 

Even before the studio was acquired in 2019, 20th Century Fox had a history of producing some popular Marvel films, including the X-Men franchise. Disney has recently brought many of their most popular titles to the streaming service, but don’t expect to see anything higher than a PG-13 rating here—sorry, Deadpool.

  • X-Men (2000)
  • X2: X-Men United (2003)
  • Fantastic Four (2005)
  • The Wolverine (2013)
  • X-Men: Days of Future Past (2014)
  • Fantastic Four (2015)
  • X-Men: Apocalypse (2016)

NOT CURRENTLY ON DISNEY+:Daredevil (2003), Elektra (2005), X-Men: The Last Stand (2006), Fantastic Four: Rise of the Silver Surfer (2007), X-Men Origins: Wolverine (2009), X-Men: First Class (2011), Deadpool (2016), Logan (2017), Deadpool 2 (2018), Dark Phoenix (2019), The New Mutants (2020). Again, you can find those movies on Amazon.

Marvel Studios/Disney+

What Live-Action Marvel TV Shows Are Currently on Disney+? 

Marvel Television was originally a separate division of Marvel Studios up until recently, and gave us shows like Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D., starring Clark Gregg, reprising his role as Agent Phil Coulson from The Avengers. Exactly how “canon” Marvel Television-produced shows are is up for debate, most considering them not a part of the Marvel Cinematic Universe. However, all upcoming Marvel shows on Disney+ will be canon, as they are being lead by Kevin Feige and are developed exclusively by Marvel Studios. If you want to dip your toes into the wider “Marvel” canon, here are the Marvel TV shows available on Disney+.

  • Agent Carter (2015)
  • Inhumans (2017)
  • Runaways (2017)
  • WandaVision (2021)
  • The Falcon and the Winter Soldier (2021)
  • Loki (2021)

NOT CURRENTLY ON DISNEY+:Daredevil, Jessica Jones, Luke Cage, Iron Fist, The Defenders, The Punisher; Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D., Cloak & Dagger, and the upcoming Helstrom.

Which Marvel Animated Series and Movies Are Streaming on Disney+?

If you’re sick of CGI live-action fight sequences, or are just on a nostalgia kick for your favorite childhood superhero shows, Marvel has a surprisingly large list of their best animated shows streaming right now.

  • Spider-Woman (1979)
  • Spider-Man (1981)
  • Spider-Man and His Amazing Friends (1981)
  • X-Men: The Series (1992)
  • Iron Man (1994)
  • Fantastic Four (1994)
  • Spider-Man (1994)
  • The Incredible Hulk (1996)
  • The Silver Surfer (1998)
  • Avengers: United They Stand (1999)
  • Spider-Man Unlimited (1999)
  • X-Men: Evolution (2000)
  • Fantastic Four: World’s Greatest Heroes (2006)
  • Iron Man: Armored Adventures (2008)
  • Wolverine and the X-Men (2009)
  • The Super Hero Squad (2009)
  • The Avengers: Earth’s Mightiest Heroes (2010)
  • Marvel’s Ultimate Spider-Man (2012)
  • Hulk and the Agents of S.M.A.S.H. (2013)
  • Avengers Assemble (2013)
  • Marvel’s Guardians of the Galaxy (2015)
  • Spider-Man (2017)
  • Marvel Rising: Secret Warriors (2018)
  • What If…? (2021)

NOT CURRENTLY ON DISNEY+: Marvel’s M.O.D.O.K. is the latest character from the pages of Marvel Comics to get their own animated series—if you want to watch that floating robotic engineered head, you can stream M.O.D.O.K. online on Hulu. But as mentioned previously, Disney+ does offer a bundle deal right now with Hulu and ESPN+, so you can get all three streamers for $13.99 a month.

What Marvel Documentaries are on Disney+? 

In addition to the MCU, Marvel has produced several documentaries and docu-series that showcase the history of the comic book giant, as well as behind-the-scenes footage from the creative teams behind multiple Marvel films. Here’s what’s on the streaming site right now.

  • Marvel 75 Years from Pulp to Pop! (2014)
  • Marvel Assembling a Universe (2014)
  • Marvel Studios Expanding the Universe (2019)
  • Marvel Hero Project (2019)
  • Marvel’s 616 (2020)
How to Watch WandaVision on Disney Plus

Marvel Studios/Disney+

What Upcoming Marvel Shows Will Be Streaming on Disney+?

A whopping 13 new spin-off series and shorts will be released to Disney+ in the upcoming months, so we’ve got the full list of what to expect (and what’s been announced so far), as well as when they’re all expected to drop on the platform. So grab some popcorn and strap in for another another year of twists and turns from the MCU’s newest additions.

  • Hawkeye (November 24, 2021)
  • Ms. Marvel (2022)
  • Moon Knight (2022)
  • She-Hulk (2022)
  • The Guardians of the Galaxy Holiday Special (Late 2022)
  • Secret Invasion (2022)
  • Armor Wars (TBA)
  • Ironheart (TBA)
  • I Am Groot (TBA)
  • Untitled Wakanda Series (TBA)

See all the Marvel content on Disney+ here

Sours: https://www.rollingstone.com/tv/tv-news/marvel-disney-plus-shows-movies-1118066/

The Marvel Cinematic Universe (MCU) television series are American superhero television shows based on characters that appear in publications by Marvel Comics. The shows have been in production since 2013, and in that time Marvel Television and ABC Studios, along with its production division ABC Signature Studios, have premiered 11 series across broadcast, streaming, and cable television on ABC, Netflix and Hulu, and Freeform, respectively. They have at least four more series in various stages of development, with Marvel Studios—the production studio behind the MCU films—having at least eight series in development for Disney+.

The first television series in the MCU, Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D., began airing on ABC during the 2013–14 television season, and was joined by Agent Carter in the 2014–15 television season. Marvel later formed a unique partnership with IMAX Entertainment to premiere Inhumans in select IMAX theaters in 2017 before airing it on ABC during the 2017–18 television season. Netflix's Marvel series began in 2015 with Daredevil and Jessica Jones, followed by Luke Cage in 2016. Iron Fist, the crossover miniseries The Defenders, and The Punisher were released in 2017. Hulu's series began in 2017 with Runaways, and will continue with Ghost Rider and Helstrom, both set for 2020. Additionally, the MCU expanded to Freeform with Cloak & Dagger in 2018. New Warriors, originally developed for Freeform, is currently awaiting a new broadcaster. The first series for Disney+ will be The Falcon and the Winter Soldier, set to premiere in 2020, followed by WandaVision, Loki, the animated What If...?, and Hawkeye, all set for 2021. Ms. Marvel, Moon Knight, and She-Hulk are also in development.

Starring in the series are Clark Gregg as Phil Coulson in Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. and Hayley Atwell as Peggy Carter in Agent Carter, both reprising their roles from the MCU films, while Anson Mount headlines Inhumans as Black Bolt. Daredevil introduces Charlie Cox in the titular role of Matt Murdock / Daredevil, as well as Jon Bernthal as Frank Castle / Punisher in its second season, who reprises his role as the star of The Punisher. Jessica Jones introduces Krysten Ritter as Jessica Jones and Mike Colter as Luke Cage, with the latter also headlining Luke Cage. Finn Jones stars as Danny Rand / Iron Fist in Iron Fist, and joins Cox, Ritter, and Colter for The Defenders. Runaways consists of the titular group, including Rhenzy Feliz as Alex Wilder, and their parents, including Ryan Sands as Geoffrey Wilder. Ghost Rider will see Gabriel Luna reprise his role as Robbie Reyes / Ghost Rider from Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.Olivia Holt and Aubrey Joseph headline Cloak & Dagger as Tandy Bowen / Dagger and Tyrone Johnson / Cloak, respectively, and will reprise their roles in the third season of Runaways, while Milana Vayntrub and Derek Theler lead New Warriors as Doreen Green / Squirrel Girl and Craig Hollis / Mister Immortal, respectively. Anthony Mackie, Sebastian Stan, Elizabeth Olsen, Paul Bettany, Tom Hiddleston, and Jeremy Renner will reprise their roles as Sam Wilson / Falcon, Bucky Barnes / Winter Soldier, Wanda Maximoff / Scarlet Witch, Vision, Loki, and Clint Barton / Hawkeye from the MCU films in their Disney+ series, with Jeffrey Wright headlining What If...? as the voice of Uatu / The Watcher.

ABC series[]

  1. ↑A version of the first two episodes debuted in IMAX theaters on September 1, 2017, and ran for two weeks, before their television premiere on ABC on September 29.[5]

Marvel's Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. (2013–present)[]

Main article: Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.

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Jed Whedon and Maurissa Tancharoen sitting.
Jeffrey Bell sitting.

(L to R) Jed Whedon, Maurissa Tancharoen and Jeffrey Bell serve as the showrunners for Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.

Agent Phil Coulson assembles a small team of S.H.I.E.L.D. (Strategic Homeland Intervention, Enforcement and Logistics Division) agents to handle strange new cases.[7] After discovering that Project Centipede and their leader, "The Clairvoyant", were affiliated with Hydra, a terrorist organization, Coulson and his team must deal with Hydra members still at large following Hydra's infiltration of, and the destruction of, S.H.I.E.L.D., while also looking to restore trust from the government and public.[8] In the wake of S.H.I.E.L.D.'s wars with Hydra and the Inhumans, a race of superhumans, Coulson begins a secret mission to protect the world from new threats.[9] After the defeat of the Inhuman Hive and with Hydra destroyed, S.H.I.E.L.D. is made a legitimate organization once again, with Coulson returning to being a field agent, and is tasked with tracking down more enhanced people—including Robbie Reyes / Ghost Rider—while Agent Leo Fitz and Dr. Holden Radcliffe complete their work on Life Model Decoys.[10] Coulson and members of his team are eventually abducted to the future in deep space, where they must try and save humanity while figuring out how to get home.[11]

In August 2012, ABC ordered a pilot for a show called S.H.I.E.L.D., to be written by Joss Whedon, Jed Whedon, and Maurissa Tancharoen, and directed by Joss Whedon.[12] On April 6, 2013, ABC announced that the show would be titled Marvel's Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.,[13] and it was officially ordered to series on May 10, 2013.[14] Jed Whedon, Tancharoen and Jeffrey Bell act as the series' showrunners,[1] while Clark Gregg reprises his role from the films as Phil Coulson.[15] The series was renewed for a second season on May 8, 2014,[16] a third on May 7, 2015,[17] a fourth on March 3, 2016,[18] and a fifth on May 11, 2017,[19] a sixth on May 14, 2018,[20] and a seventh season on November 16, 2018;[2] the sixth and seventh seasons both consist of 13 episodes.[20][2] The seventh season will serve as the series' final season.[3]

The first season, which premiered on September 24, 2013,[21] aired episodes that directly relate to events in the films Thor: The Dark World and Captain America: The Winter Soldier.[22][23] The revelation in Captain America: The Winter Soldier that S.H.I.E.L.D. had been infiltrated by Hydra had a huge impact on the series. Regarding the synergy the show had with addressing events from the film, Loeb said, "It's an extremely unique experience that doesn't exist anywhere else out there in the entertainment business."[24] The second season, which premiered on September 23, 2014,[25] introduces Inhumans to the MCU,[26] ahead of their own television series.[27] Additionally, a recurring plot point in the first two seasons involved the body of a member of the Kree race, who play a significant role in Guardians of the Galaxy.[28] The third season, which premiered on September 29, 2015,[29] introduces the concept of the Secret Warriors, with new Inhuman characters inspired by the comic of the same name,[30][31] as well as Life Model Decoys.[32] The fourth season, which premiered on September 20, 2016,[33] sees Robbie Reyes / Ghost Rider introduced to the MCU,[34] and ties to the second season of Agent Carter and Doctor Strange.[35][36] The last four episodes of the fifth season, which premiered on December 1, 2017,[11] coincides with the events of Avengers: Infinity War.[37] The sixth season premiered on May 10, 2019.[38]

In the first season, Samuel L. Jackson,[39]Cobie Smulders,Maximiliano Hernández,[41]Titus Welliver[42] and Jaimie Alexander[43] all reprise their roles as Nick Fury, Maria Hill, Jasper Sitwell, Felix Blake, and Sif, respectively, from previous MCU films and One-Shots. In the second season, Alexander and Smulders return,[44][45] while Hayley Atwell,[46]Neal McDonough, Kenneth Choi,[47] and Henry Goodman[48][49] also reprise their roles as Peggy Carter, Timothy "Dum Dum" Dugan, Jim Morita, and List, respectively, from previous MCU films. In the third season, William Sadler reprises his role as Matthew Ellis from the MCU films,[50] and Powers Boothe recurs as his previously unnamed The Avengers character, Gideon Malick.[51]

Marvel's Agent Carter (2015–2016)[]

Main article: Agent Carter (TV series)

In 1946, Peggy Carter must balance the routine office work she does for the Strategic Scientific Reserve while secretly assisting Howard Stark, who finds himself framed for supplying deadly weapons to enemies of the United States. Carter is assisted by Stark's butler, Edwin Jarvis, to find those responsible and dispose of the weapons.[52][53] Carter eventually moves from New York City to Los Angeles to deal with the threats of the new atomic age in the wake of World War II, gaining new friends, a new home and potential new love.[54]

By September 2013, Marvel was developing a series inspired by the Agent Carter One-Shot, featuring Peggy Carter,[55] and in January 2014, the series was confirmed to be in development, with the script for a potential pilot to be written by Captain America: The First Avenger and Captain America: The Winter Soldier writers Christopher Markus & Stephen McFeely.[56] On May 8, 2014, ABC officially ordered Marvel's Agent Carter to series.[16] Tara Butters, Michele Fazekas and Chris Dingess act as showrunners on the series,[4][56] while Hayley Atwell reprises her role from the films as Peggy Carter.[56] The series was renewed for a second season on May 7, 2015,[17] and was officially canceled by ABC on May 12, 2016.[57]

The first season, which premiered on January 6, 2015,[58] introduces the origins of the Black Widow and Winter Soldier programs, which both appear in several MCU films.[59][60][61] The second season, which premiered on January 19, 2016,[62] features the Darkforce, which ties to the character Marcus Daniels in Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. and Doctor Strange.[63]

In the first season, Dominic Cooper reprise his role of Howard Stark from Captain America: The First Avenger.[64]James D'Arcy portrays Edwin Jarvis,[65] Stark's butler in the series who eventually serves as inspiration for Tony Stark's artificial intelligenceJ.A.R.V.I.S.[66]Costa Ronin portrays a young Anton Vanko, the co-creator of the arc reactor with Stark.[67]Chris Evans appears as Steve Rogers / Captain America via archive footage from The First Avenger.[68] McDonough and Toby Jones reprise their roles as Dugan and Arnim Zola, respectively.[69][70] In the second season, Cooper returns to reprise his role.[71]

Marvel's Inhumans (2017)[]

Main article: Inhumans (TV series)

Scott Buck speaking into a microphone.

After a military coup, the Inhuman Royal Family, led by Black Bolt, escape to Hawaii where they must save themselves and the world.[72]

In November 2016, Marvel Television and IMAX Corporation announced Marvel's Inhumans, to be produced in conjunction with ABC Studios.[27][73] The series' first two episodes were filmed entirely on IMAX digital cameras,[74] and premiered on IMAX screens on September 1, 2017, for two weeks.[5] ABC then broadcast the series weekly starting with the first two episodes on September 29, 2017,[5] with the network airing of the first two episodes featuring exclusive content, outside of the versions screened on IMAX.[27] Select action sequences in the rest of the series were also shot on IMAX.[74] The series was neither intended to be a reworking of the planned film from Marvel Studios, nor a spin-off from Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.[75]Ben Sherwood, president of Disney–ABC Television Group, added that "We've worked very carefully with our friends at Marvel Studios—and this is a critical point—to make sure that calendar-wise and content-wise we are only enhancing" the MCU; the theatrical debut of the series was timed to not interfere with the release of any Marvel Studios films.[76] In December 2016, Scott Buck was announced as showrunner and executive producer for the series.[6] In February 2017, Anson Mount was cast as Black Bolt.[73] Filming began in March 2017 in Hawaii,[77] and concluded in June.[78] ABC officially canceled the series on May 11, 2018.[79]

Netflix series[]

By October 2013, Marvel was preparing four drama series and a miniseries to present to video on demand services and cable providers, with Netflix, Amazon, and WGN America expressing interest.[89] That November, it was announced that Disney would provide Netflix with live-action series based on Daredevil, Jessica Jones, Iron Fist, and Luke Cage, leading up to a miniseries based on the Defenders.[90] These series and their respective characters were referred to internally by Marvel Television as the "Marvel Street-Level Heroes" or "Marvel Knights".[91]

Marvel's Daredevil (2015–2018)[]

Main article: Daredevil (TV series)

Lawyer-by-day Matt Murdock uses his heightened senses from being blinded as a young boy to fight crime at night on the streets of Hell's Kitchen as Daredevil, juxtaposed with the rise of crime lord Wilson Fisk.[92] Murdock eventually crosses paths with Frank Castle / Punisher, a vigilante with far deadlier methods, and sees the return of his old girlfriend, Elektra Natchios.[93][94] When Wilson Fisk is released from prison, Murdock must decide between hiding from the world or embracing his life as a hero vigilante.[95]

In December 2013, Marvel confirmed that Drew Goddard would be the executive producer and showrunner for Daredevil, and would write and direct the first episode,[96] though at the end of May 2014, it was announced that Goddard would no longer be the showrunner for the series, being replaced by Steven S. DeKnight. Goddard, who wrote the first two episodes, remained with the show as an executive producer. It was also revealed that the series would be titled Marvel's Daredevil.[80] A few days later, Charlie Cox was cast as Daredevil.[97] A second season was ordered on April 21, 2015, with Doug Petrie and Marco Ramirez taking over as showrunners from DeKnight, who could not return to the series due to a prior commitment.[81] A third season was ordered in July 2016,[98] with Erik Oleson announced as the new showrunner of the series in October 2017.[82] Netflix canceled the series on November 29, 2018.[99]

The first season, which debuted in its entirety on April 10, 2015,[100] features references to The Avengers and the Battle of New York,[101] as well as mentioning Carl "Crusher" Creel, who appears on Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.[102] The insignia for the Iron Fist antagonist Steel Serpent is also seen in the season.[103] The second season, which premiered on March 18, 2016,[104] features the motorcycle gang Dogs of Hell, who appeared on Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.,[105] along with numerous references to the events of the first season of Jessica Jones.[106][107][108] The third season was released on October 19, 2018.[109]

In the second season, Jon Bernthal was cast in a leading role as Frank Castle / Punisher,[110] before headlining his own series,[88] while Michelle Hurd and Carrie-Anne Moss reprise their roles of Samantha Reyes and Jeri Hogarth from Jessica Jones.[107][108]

Marvel's Jessica Jones (2015–2019)[]

Main article: Jessica Jones (TV series)

Melissa Rosenberg standing against a city background.

Former superhero Jessica Jones suffers from post-traumatic stress disorder, so she opens her own detective agency to help people.[111] She begins to put her life back together after her encounter with Kilgrave, taking on a new case that makes her reluctantly confront her past.[112]

In November 2013, Melissa Rosenberg was announced as the writer and executive producer of the series,[83] and the following March, Loeb stated that filming would begin after Daredevil.[113] In December 2014, Krysten Ritter was cast as Jessica Jones in the series,[114] officially titled Marvel's Jessica Jones.[115] A second season was ordered on January 17, 2016,[116] and a third on April 12, 2018.[117] Netflix canceled the series on February 18, 2019, ahead of the third season's premiere.[118]

The first season, which debuted in its entirety on November 20, 2015,[119] features references to the events and characters of The Avengers.[120] In the first season, Mike Colter was cast as Luke Cage,[121] a recurring role in the series before headlining his own series.[111]Rosario Dawson reprises her Daredevil role of Claire Temple,[122] as does Royce Johnson in his role of Brett Mahoney.[123] The second season, which was released on March 8, 2018,[124] sees Elden Henson reprise his role of Franklin "Foggy" Nelson,[125] as well as Rob Morgan as Turk Barrett[126] and Tijuana Ricks as Thembi Wallace.[citation needed]

The third season was released on June 14, 2019.[127]

Marvel's Luke Cage (2016–2018)[]

Main article: Luke Cage (TV series)

When a sabotaged experiment gives him super strength and unbreakable skin, Luke Cage becomes a fugitive attempting to rebuild his life in Harlem, and must soon confront his past and fight a battle for the heart of his city.[128] After clearing his name, Cage becomes a hero and celebrity in Harlem, only to encounter a new threat that makes him confront the line between hero and villain.[129]

Colter reprises his role as Carl Lucas / Luke Cage in his own series,[111][121][130] titled Marvel's Luke Cage.[84] In March 2014, Loeb stated that the series would begin filming after Iron Fist, being the fourth of the individual series.[113] By March 2015, it was instead slated to be the third of the individual series, beginning production after Jessica Jones.[81][131] The series was switched with Iron Fist after the positive reception Luke Cage received on Jessica Jones, becoming that series' breakout star and Marvel wanting to "follow the momentum".[132] Also in March, Cheo Hodari Coker was announced as showrunner and executive producer of the series.[84] A second season was ordered on December 3, 2016.[133] Netflix canceled the series on October 19, 2018.[134]

The first season, which premiered on September 30, 2016,[135] features references to The Avengers, the second season of Daredevil, the first season of Jessica Jones, and a flier for Colleen Wing's martial arts class, and mentions Justin Hammer, Wilson Fisk and Frank Castle.[136] Dawson,[137] Morgan, Rachel Taylor, Stephen Rider,[136]Parisa Fitz-Henley,[138] and Danny Johnson[139] reprise their roles as Claire Temple, Turk Barrett, Trish Walker, Blake Tower, Reva Connors and Ben Donovan in the series, respectively.

The second season, which premiered on June 22, 2018,[129] features a reference to Detective Brigid O'Reilly recently moving from Harlem to New Orleans, in reference to that character's role in the series Cloak & Dagger.[140][141]Finn Jones,[142]Jessica Henwick,[143] and Henson reprise their roles as Danny Rand, Colleen Wing, and Foggy Nelson in the season.[144]

Marvel's Iron Fist (2017–2018)[]

Main article: Iron Fist (TV series)

Danny Rand returns to New York City, after being missing for fifteen years, to reclaim his family company. However, when a threat emerges, Rand must choose between his family's legacy and his duties as the Iron Fist.[145]

In March 2014, Loeb initially stated that the series would begin filming after Jessica Jones as the third of the individual series.[113] By March 2015, it was expected to be the fourth of the individual series, entering production following Luke Cage.[81][131] The series was switched with Luke Cage after the positive reception Luke Cage received on Jessica Jones, becoming that series' breakout star and Marvel wanting to "follow the momentum".[132] In April 2015, the title of the series was revealed to be Marvel's Iron Fist.[81] In December 2015, Marvel announced that Scott Buck would serve as showrunner and executive producer of the series.[85] In February 2016, Finn Jones was cast as Rand.[146][147] A second season was revealed to be in development in July 2017,[148] with Raven Metzner announced as the new showrunner for the season, replacing Buck.[86] Netflix canceled the series on October 12, 2018.[149]

The first season, which premiered on March 17, 2017,[145] makes references to the events of The Avengers, the Hulk, Stark Industries, Jessica Jones, Daredevil, Luke Cage, and Seagate Prison,[150] and mentions the Dogs of Hell biker gang, New York Bulletin editor-in-chief Mitchell Ellison and reporter Karen Page,[151]Roxxon Oil and Midland Circle.[152][153] Events from the second season of Daredevil are also noted throughout.[150][153] Moss,[154] Dawson,[155]Wai Ching Ho,[156] Marquis Rodriguez,[157]Tijuana Ricks, and Suzanne H. Smart reprise their roles as Jeri Hogarth, Claire Temple, Gao, Darryl, Thembi Wallace, and Shirley Benson, respectively, in the series.

The second season, which was released on September 7, 2018,[158] sees Simone Missick reprise her role as Misty Knight.[148]

Marvel's The Defenders (2017)[]

Main article: The Defenders (miniseries)

The superheroes Daredevil, Jessica Jones, Luke Cage, and Iron Fist must join forces to save New York City from the threat of the Hand.[85]

The Defenders sees Cox, Ritter, Colter, and Jones reprise their roles as Matt Murdock / Daredevil, Jessica Jones, Luke Cage, and Danny Rand / Iron Fist, respectively, from the previous television series.[159] In March 2014, Loeb stated that the miniseries, officially titled Marvel's The Defenders, would begin filming after Iron Fist.[113][131] In April 2016, Marvel announced that Douglas Petrie and Marco Ramirez would act as showrunners for The Defenders. However, by the start of filming in New York City in October 2016,[161][162] Petrie had left the series as co-showrunner.[87] Filming concluded in March 2017.[163] The eight-episode event premiered on August 18, 2017.[164][165]

The miniseries also sees many supporting characters from the individual series reprise their roles, including, Deborah Ann Woll,[166] Henson,[167]Scott Glenn,[168]Élodie Yung,[169]Eka Darville,[170] Moss,[167] Taylor,[168] Simone Missick,[171]Jessica Henwick,[172] Dawson,[168] Ho,[173]Ramón Rodríguez,[174]Peter McRobbie,[175] Morgan,[176] Amy Rutberg, Susan Varon, and Nichole Yannetty as Karen Page, Foggy Nelson, Stick, Elektra Natchios, Malcolm Ducasse, Jeri Hogarth, Trish Walker, Misty Knight, Colleen Wing, Claire Temple, Gao, Bakuto, Lantom, Turk Barrett, Marci Stahl, Josie and Nicole, respectively. Midland Circle, which was referenced in previous Netflix series,[177][178] is revealed to be an operation of the Hand, who bought the building to search for the life substance hidden beneath the property.[178] The miniseries also references the events of The Avengers.[176]

Marvel's The Punisher (2017–2019)[]

Main article: The Punisher (TV series)

Frank Castle is haunted and hunted after the murder of his family and becomes a vigilante known in the criminal underworld as the Punisher, who aims to fight crime by any means necessary.[88][179]

By January 2016, ahead of the debut of Bernthal as armed vigilante Frank Castle / Punisher in the second season of Daredevil, Netflix was in "very early development" on a spin-off series titled The Punisher, and was looking for a showrunner. The series would be centered on Bernthal as Castle, and was described as a stand-alone series, outside of the series leading up to The Defenders.[180][181][182] Loeb implied that Marvel Television had not instigated the development of the spin-off and were focusing on making "the best 13 episodes of Daredevil season two" at the time, but did say, "I'm never going to discourage a network from looking at one of our characters and encouraging us to do more....If we are lucky enough that through the writing, through the direction, through the actor that people want to see more of that person, terrific."[183] In April 2016, Marvel and Netflix ordered The Punisher, along with confirming Bernthal's involvement and naming Steve Lightfoot as showrunner.[88] Filming began in Brooklyn, New York in October 2016,[184] and concluded in April 2017.[185] A second season was ordered on December 12, 2017.[186] Netflix canceled the series on February 18, 2019.[118]

In the first season, which was released on November 17, 2017,[187] Woll and Morgan reprise their roles as Karen Page and Turk Barrett, respectively.[188][189] The second season was released on January 18, 2019.[190]

Hulu series[]

Marvel's Runaways (2017–present)[]

Main article: Runaways (TV series)

When six teenagers discover their parents are villains, collectively known as the Pride, they reluctantly unite to go against them.[191] Later on the run from their parents, the teenagers live on their own and figure out how to stop the Pride, before learning there might be a mole hiding among them.[195]

In August 2016, Marvel announced Marvel's Runaways had received a pilot order, along with additional scripts, from the streaming service Hulu, based on the team of the same name. The pilot is written by Josh Schwartz and Stephanie Savage, who also serve as executive producers and showrunners of the series.[191] In February 2017, Marvel announced the cast of the Runaways, with Rhenzy Feliz as Alex Wilder, Lyrica Okano as Nico Minoru, Virginia Gardner as Karolina Dean, Ariela Barer as Gert Yorkes, Gregg Sulkin as Chase Stein, and Allegra Acosta as Molly Hernandez.[196] Shortly after, they announced the cast of the Pride, the parents of the Runaways, with Ryan Sands as Geoffrey Wilder, Angel Parker as Catherine Wilder, Brittany Ishibashi as Tina Minoru, James Yaegashi as Robert Minoru, Kevin Weisman as Dale Yorkes, Brigid Brannagh as Stacey Yorkes, Annie Wersching as Leslie Dean, Kip Pardue as Frank Dean, James Marsters as Victor Stein, and Ever Carradine as Janet Stein.[197] Hulu ordered the series in May 2017.[198] Filming began in Los Angeles in February 2017,[199][200] and concluded in October 2017.[201] Hulu renewed the series for a second season on January 8, 2018.[202] The series was renewed for a third season by Hulu on March 24, 2019.[192]

A different version of Tina Minoru previously appeared in Doctor Strange, in a minor role as a Master of the Mystic Arts portrayed by Linda Louise Duan.[203][204][205][206] The first season premiered on November 21, 2017.[207] The second season, which was released on December 21, 2018,[208] mentions Roxxon Oil and Wakanda, and features a connection to the Dark Dimension from Doctor Strange.[209][210] The third season, set for release on December 13, 2019,[193] will see Olivia Holt and Aubrey Joseph reprise their roles as Tandy Bowen / Dagger and Tyrone Johnson / Cloak from the series Cloak & Dagger for a crossover episode.[211]

Marvel's Ghost Rider[]

On the Texas–Mexico border, Robbie Reyes avenges the innocent by unleashing the demonic Ghost Rider.[194]

In May 2019, it was announced that Hulu is developing a Ghost Rider series, featuring the Robbie Reyes incarnation of the character. A television series centered around the character has been discussed for some time, after first appearing in the Ghost Rider pod of Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. season 4. Gabriel Luna will reprise his role for the series.[212] Ingrid Escajeda was hired to serve as showrunner, in addition to executive producing the series with Paul Zbyszewski and Jeph Loeb.[194]

The series is not intended to be a spin-off of Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D., but will focus on the "same character [introduced in Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.] with [a] new story that lives unto its own."[213] The series will be part of under a banner called "Adventure Into Fear".[91]

Marvel's Helstrom[]

Daimon and Ana Helstrom, the children of a powerful serial killer, hunt down the worst of humanity.[194]

In May 2019, it was announced that Hulu had ordered to series a show about Daimon Helstrom / Hellstorm and Ana Helstrom / Satana. Zbyszewski will serve as showrunner, as well as executive produce the series with Loeb.[194] The series will be part of under a banner called "Adventure Into Fear".[91]

Freeform series[]

Marvel's Cloak & Dagger (2018–present)[]

Main article: Cloak & Dagger (TV series)

In New Orleans, Tandy Bowen and Tyrone Johnson, two teenagers from different backgrounds, acquire superpowers after a life-changing event that revolved around the collapse of an oil platform. As their relationship unfolds, they soon realize that their powers work better when they are together, but their feelings for each other make their already complicated world even more challenging.[215] Tandy and Tyrone later work to solve the abductions of women run by Andre Deschaine while dealing with Detective Brigid O'Reilly's vigilante half Mayhem.

In April 2016, the ABC-owned network Freeform announced a straight-to-series order for Marvel's Cloak & Dagger, based on the characters of the same name,[215] calling it their "first venture into the Marvel Cinematic Universe", and describing the show as a "superhero love story".[216] In January 2017, Olivia Holt and Aubrey Joseph were cast as Tandy Bowen / Dagger and Tyrone Johnson / Cloak, respectively.[217]Joe Pokaski serves as showrunner for the series.[214] Filming for the series occurs in New Orleans.[218] A second season was ordered on July 20, 2018.[219]

The first season, which premiered on June 7, 2018,[220] sees Roxxon Oil featured,[221] along with the Darkforce, which fuels Cloak's powers and was previously established in Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. and Agent Carter,[222] and makes reference to Tony Stark.[223] The second season premiered on April 4, 2019.[224] Both seasons also make direct references to the setting and characters of the Netflix shows Luke Cage, Iron Fist, and Daredevil.[140][141][223][225]

Disney+ series[]

Sours: https://ultimatepopculture.fandom.com/wiki/List_of_Marvel_Cinematic_Universe_television_series
  1. Unbroken bonds symbol
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Every Marvel TV show ranked, from Inhumans to WandaVision

The Falcon and the Winter Soldier, Disney+'s second Marvel TV show, had several great elements. Anthony Mackie and Sebastian Stan, who play the show's titular duo, have crackling chemistry, and it's easy to understand why the studio decided to build a show around them. Sam and his family's financial struggles in Louisiana is the type of relatable storytelling you don't often see in the MCU or superhero stories in general. And finally, Sam's learning of and then grappling with the heart-wrenching legacy of Isaiah Bradley (Carl Lumbly), a Black American super-soldier who was rewarded for his service with imprisonment and torturous experimentation, as he pondered whether or not to pick up the mantle of Captain America. Unfortunately, all of these got lost in the show's frustrating "six-hour movie" approach, which created pacing issues; shallow world-building that failed to make the effects of the Blip feel immediate; and weird tonal choices, especially when it came to John Walker (Wyatt Russell) because it felt like the writers, director, and Russell had wildly different interpretations of how we should feel about him. But, hey, at least we got Julia Louis-Dreyfus in the MCU and Zemo dancing, right? -Chancellor Agard

Sours: https://ew.com/tv/marvel-tv-shows-ranked/
IGN News - Five New Marvel TV Series Announced For Netflix

List of Marvel Cinematic Universe television series

List of television series set within the Marvel Cinematic Universe

The Marvel Cinematic Universe (MCU) television series are American superhero television shows based on characters that appear in publications by Marvel Comics. They are set in, or inspired by, the shared universe of the MCU film franchise.

The MCU first expanded to television after the creation of Marvel Television in 2010, with that studio producing 12 series with ABC Studios and its production division ABC Signature Studios from September 2013 to October 2020. These premiered across broadcast, streaming, and cable respectively on ABC, Netflix and Hulu, and Freeform. The main ABC series were inspired by the films and featured film characters, and were referred to as the "Marvel Heroes" series. A connected group of series for Netflix were called the "Marvel Knights" series, and crossed over with each other. Young adult-focused series were produced for Freeform and Hulu, while the latter also had a group of series called "Adventure into Fear" planned before Marvel Television was shut down in December 2019.

Marvel Studios—the production studio behind the films—began developing their own series in 2018 for the streaming service Disney+. The first of these series premiered in January 2021, with three more having also released. At least 12 more series and two specials are in development. These are focused on supporting characters from the films, have much larger budgets than Marvel Television series, and interconnect with the films in a way that the Marvel Television series did not.

Development[edit]

In June 2010, Marvel Television was launched with Jeph Loeb as head.[1] The studio began producing television series inspired by the Marvel Cinematic Universe (MCU) film franchise,[2][3] though it had to be aware of Marvel Studios' plans for the films so as not to interfere when introducing someone or something to the universe.[4] In August 2015, Marvel Studios was integrated into The Walt Disney Studios with President Kevin Feige reporting to Walt Disney Studios chairman Alan F. Horn instead of Marvel Entertainment CEO Isaac Perlmutter, while Marvel Television remained under Perlmutter's control.[5] This was seen as widening the existing divide between the Marvel film and television divisions, and making it unlikely that the films would acknowledge the series' events and characters.[6] By that point, the only Marvel Television series that had significant involvement from Marvel Studios was Agent Carter.[7][8]

By September 2018, Marvel Studios was developing several limited series for Disney's new streaming service Disney+, to be centered on "second tier" characters from the MCU films who had not and were unlikely to star in their own films; the actors who portrayed the characters in the films reprise their roles for the series. Feige was taking a "hands-on role" in each series' development,[9] focusing on "continuity of story" with the films and "handling" the returning actors.[10] Loeb said Marvel Television would continue to develop new MCU series, including their own Disney+ series.[11] In March 2019, Feige said the Marvel Studios series would take characters from the films, change them, and see those changes reflected in future films; new characters introduced in the series could also go on to appear in films.[12] By September 2019, many of Marvel Television's existing series were cancelled or ending, and several developing projects did not move forward. Variety reported that the industry perception of these events was that Marvel Television was being phased out in favor of the new Marvel Studios series, which had access to well-known MCU characters.[13] The new series also had reported budgets of $100–150 million each, which were much larger than the Marvel Television series.[13][14] A month later, Feige was named Chief Creative Officer of Marvel Entertainment, with Marvel Television moving under Marvel Studios and executives at Marvel Television reporting to Feige.[15] Loeb was expected to leave Marvel by the end of the year.[16]

In December, Feige referred to the Marvel Studios series as "a new type of cinematic [story] that we haven't done before", and indicated that he considered them the first MCU stories on television by saying "for the first time ... the MCU will be on your TV screen at home on Disney+ and interconnect with the movies and go back and forth".[17] The next day, Marvel Television announced that it would complete work on its existing television series but would stop developing new projects. The division was set to shut down, with several executives moving to Marvel Studios to oversee the completion of existing series including executive producer Karim Zreik. Other staff were laid off, while Loeb was set to remain with the company until the handover was completed.[18][19] Zreik left Marvel Studios in June 2020 to become the head of television for Phil Lord and Christopher Miller, whose projects include several Marvel-based series for Sony Pictures Television that are intended to connect to the superhero films of the Sony's Spider-Man Universe (SSU).[20][21]

In February 2021, Ryan Coogler's production company Proximity Media was set to work alongside Marvel Studios on select Disney+ series as part of a television deal with Walt Disney Television.[22] In May, WandaVisionhead writerJac Schaeffer signed a three-year overall television deal with Marvel Studios to develop additional Disney+ projects for the studio.[23] A month later, Marvel Studios executive Victoria Alonso said the studio's expansion to animation with the series What If...? was an opportunity to make the MCU more diverse, and the medium of animation allowed Marvel Studios to work with new companies around the world.[24] At that time, Marvel Studios was creating an "animation branch and mini studio" to focus on more animated content beyond What If...?, building infrastructure to handle multiple animated series at once and looking to hire around 300 new staff for production roles on a slate of Disney+ animated series.[25][26][27]What If...? director Bryan Andrews said each additional animated series would exist "on its own term[s] and hopefully explore unexpected facets of the MCU",[28] with Marvel Studios' Brad Winderbaum saying the studio would only tell stories that they felt needed to be told in animated form.[26] He added that Marvel Studios was open to working with corporate siblings Pixar Animation and Walt Disney Animation on MCU content "under the right circumstances".[29]

Marvel Television[edit]

ABC series[edit]

Main article: Marvel's ABC television series

The first television series that Marvel Television developed to be part of the Marvel Cinematic Universe was Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.; it was ordered to pilot by ABC in August 2012.[2][34] In January 2014, the series Agent Carter was announced;[3] it was canceled in May 2016.[35] That November, Marvel and IMAX Corporation announced Inhumans, based on the species of the same name, after a planned film starring the characters was removed from Marvel Studios' slate.[36][37][38] ABC canceled the series in May 2018.[39] In July 2019, the seventh season of Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. was announced to be its last.[40] Loeb explained a month later that Marvel categorized its ABC series as the "Marvel Heroes" series due to their close connections to the MCU films, especially with the main characters of both Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. and Agent Carter having originated in films.[11]

Netflix series[edit]

Main article: Marvel's Netflix television series

By October 2013, Marvel was preparing four drama series and a miniseries to present to video on demand services and cable providers, with Netflix, Amazon, and WGN America expressing interest.[51] Disney announced the next month that it would provide Netflix with live-action series based on Daredevil, Jessica Jones, Iron Fist, and Luke Cage, leading to a crossover miniseries based on the Defenders.[52] In April 2016, Marvel and Netflix ordered The Punisher as a spin-off from Daredevil.[50] Netflix had canceled all of the series by the end of February 2019, but continued to stream the existing seasons.[53] These characters could not appear in any non-Netflix series or films for at least two years following the cancellations.[54] Loeb stated in August 2019 that Marvel Television categorized the Netflix series internally as the "Marvel Street-Level Heroes" or "Marvel Knights".[11]

Young adult series[edit]

Main article: Marvel's young adult television series

At San Diego Comic-Con 2011, Loeb announced a series based on the Marvel Comics characters Cloak and Dagger was in development;[57]Freeform ordered the project to series in April 2016.[58] That August, Hulu ordered a new series based on the comics group the Runaways.[55][59] Marvel initially said there were no plans to crossover these series,[60] but Cloak and Dagger were announced to be appearing in the third season of Runaways in August 2019.[61] Loeb explained that Marvel categorized Runaways and Cloak & Dagger as its "YA", or "young adult", franchise, and said Marvel Television's push into the young adult genre was in response to Marvel Studios doing the same with Spider-Man. Loeb hoped there would be further crossovers between the two series,[11] but Cloak and Dagger was canceled in October 2019,[62] followed by Runaways that November.[63]

Adventure into Fear[edit]

Main article: Adventure into Fear (franchise)

Hulu ordered two series based on Ghost Rider and the siblings Daimon and Ana Helstrom in May 2019, intending to build an interconnected universe between the two in a similar fashion to Marvel's Netflix shows.[65] Marvel announced the series as the cornerstone of the "Spirits of Vengeance", and Loeb said they were moving into a new, "chilling" corner of the Marvel Universe.[66] Loeb revealed in August that Marvel was now referring to these series collectively as "Adventure into Fear", and said more series under the banner were in development.[11] A month later, Hulu decided not to move forward with Ghost Rider due to creative differences.[67] When Marvel Television was folded into Marvel Studios in December, the studio said production on Helstrom would be completed but no further series would be developed.[18]Helstrom was canceled a year later in December 2020.[68]

Crossovers to feature films[edit]

After [running something by Jeph] Loeb we'll run it through New York, Joe Quesada, Dan Buckley, and those guys. [Then we] pitch our stuff to Kevin Feige and his movie group to see if there's something we can tie into, to see if they're okay about us using a character, or a weapon or some other cool thing. Everything is interconnected.

Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. executive producer Jeffrey Bell in September 2014, on the process of working in with the MCU[69]

Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. executive producer Jeffrey Bell revealed at the show's 2014 PaleyFest panel that the producers and writers were able to read the screenplays for upcoming MCU films to know where the universe was headed.[70] He noted that since the films have to be "big" and move "quickly through a lot of huge pieces", it was beneficial for the films to have the television series fill in any "gaps" for them.[71] His fellow executive producer Jed Whedon explained that each Marvel project is intended to stand alone first before there is any interweaving, and noted that the series has to be aware of Marvel Studios' plans for the films so as not to interfere when introducing someone or something to the universe.[4] Bell said this was preferable so that people who do not watch the films could still follow the series, and vice versa.[71] Joss Whedon noted that this process meant the television series got the "leftovers".[72]

In October 2014, Feige said the opportunity "certainly" existed for characters in the Netflix series to appear in Avengers: Infinity War (2018).[73] In March 2015, Loeb said Marvel Television would have to "earn" the ability to have the Netflix series crossover with the films and ABC series, adding each series had to be established and defined on their own before crossovers could occur.[74] In September 2015, Feige elaborated on the films referencing the television series, saying it would be "inevitable at some point" but noted the timing would be difficult given how the production schedule for the series allowed them to be "more nimble and faster" to produce things that could align with the films while the long development period for a film would make it difficult to reference events of a series.[75]

Loeb reiterated in July 2016 the issue of scheduling by saying "if I'm shooting a television series and that's going to go on over a six-month or eight-month period, how am I going to get [a television series actor] to be able to go be in a movie?" This would be less of an issue if characters were making minor cameo appearances, but Loeb explained that Marvel was not interested in cameos and Easter eggs just for the sake of fan service, which could detract from the story being told; "Our feeling is that the connection isn't just whether or not somebody is walking into a movie or walking out of a television show. It's connected in the way that the shows come from the same place, that they are real, that they are grounded."[76] Eric Carroll, producer on Spider-Man: Homecoming (2017), felt with the introduction of Queens-based Spider-Man to the MCU that it "would be really fun" to make mention of the Defenders based in Manhattan, adding, "it's definitely a card I would love to see played, if not sooner rather than later".[77] In January 2017, Vincent D'Onofrio, who portrays Wilson Fisk in Daredevil, said he was open to appearing in the films, but believed it would most likely not happen. D'Onofrio cited Feige's previous reasoning as well as the fact that the films already had difficulty handling the large number of characters they had.[78] In March 2017, Anthony Mackie, who portrays Sam Wilson / Falcon in the films, felt a crossover between the films and television series "wouldn't work at all" given they are "different universes, different worlds, different companies, different designs" and that "Kevin Feige is very specific about how he wants the Marvel Universe to be seen in the film world".[79] That May, Feige noted that a character appearing in a television series would not necessarily exclude them from appearing in a film, adding that "at some point, there's going to be a crossover. Crossover, repetition, or something."[80] Regarding the potential for the Avengers to learn in the films that Phil Coulson is alive, Loeb stated, "It's certainly something that will get resolved, and it may get resolved in a very surprising way."[81]

Loeb said in July 2017 that Marvel Television had no plans for series to crossover across networks. Specifically for the similarly themed Cloak & Dagger, New Warriors, and Runaways, which all deal with young heroes, Loeb noted, "You'll see things that comment on each other; we try to touch base wherever we can... things that are happening in L.A. [where Runaways is set] are not exactly going to be affecting what's happening in New Orleans [where Cloak & Dagger is set]... It's being aware of it and trying to find a way for it to be able to discuss in a way that makes sense."[60] He added in October that scheduling of each series factors into why crossovers between them are more difficult to pull off, and that network "feelings" need to be considered. He also spoke on why the television series do not show Avengers Tower as it appears in the films when they depict New York City, and stated that Marvel Television wanted to be "less specific" about the television characters' relationships to the tower because that "helps the audience understand that this could be on any street corner" and that the characters could be in an area of the city where you would not be able to see the tower, even though it exists.[82] In June 2018, speaking to how the MCU television series would be affected by the events of Avengers: Infinity War, Loeb noted that "For the most part our stories will take place before Thanos clicked his fingers. A lot of that has to do with production and when we are telling our stories versus when the movies come out."[83] In April 2019, actor James D'Arcy appeared in Avengers: Endgame, reprising his role of Edwin Jarvis from the television series Agent Carter. This marked the first time a character introduced in an MCU television series appears in an MCU film.[84]

Speaking to how the Marvel Television series fit within the larger MCU timeline, Loeb noted, "We don't want to ever do something in our show[s] which contradicts what's happening in the movies. The movies are the lead dog. They're setting the timeline for the MCU and what's going on. Our job is to navigate within that world."[85] The Roxxon Corporation, which had been featured in the Iron Man films, is referenced in multiple Marvel Television series, with Adam Barnhardt of ComicBook.com calling it "the go-to Easter egg for most shows involved in the Marvel Television sphere".[86] In March 2021, the Darkhold appeared in WandaVision, where it had a different design than the one in Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. and Runaways. While WandaVision's head writerJac Schaeffer said there were no "big conversations" amongst the writers regarding its appearance in the Marvel Television series,[87][88] director Matt Shakman said that despite the new design, he believed it was the same one seen in those series.[89] Following the introduction of the multiverse to the MCU in the first season finale of Loki, Jack Shephard of Total Film suggested that Marvel Studios officially announce that the Marvel Television series take place on a different timeline within that multiverse and are not MCU canon since it was becoming obvious to fans and commentators that the studio was not taking the events of those series into account.[90]

Marvel Studios[edit]

Phase Four[edit]

Main article: Marvel Cinematic Universe: Phase Four § Television series

The following series are either being released currently or are fully available for streaming on Disney+.

During the 2019 San Diego Comic-Con, Feige announced the Disney+ series The Falcon and the Winter Soldier, WandaVision, Loki, What If...?, and Hawkeye as part of Marvel Studios' Phase Four slate alongside several films.[98] At D23 Expo 2019, Feige announced Ms. Marvel, Moon Knight, and She-Hulk as also part of Phase Four.[99] At Disney's Investor Day in December 2020, Feige announced additional Phase Four series—Secret Invasion, Ironheart, and Armor Wars—as well as The Guardians of the Galaxy Holiday Special.[100] In February 2021, a drama series set in Wakanda was revealed to be in development for Phase Four from Ryan Coogler, writer and director of Black Panther (2018) and Black Panther: Wakanda Forever (2022).[22][101]

Upcoming[edit]

At any given time, Marvel Studios has future television series planned five-to-six years out from what they have announced.[132] By December 2020, after announcing series through the end of 2022,[100] future series were planned through 2028.[132] Second seasons of Loki and What If...? are in development,[128][129] as is a series centered on Maya Lopez / Echo as a spin-off from Hawkeye,[130] and a series centered on Agatha Harkness as a spin-off from WandaVision.[131] Marvel Studios is also developing a slate of at least three more animated series in addition to What If...? that,[24][27] as of August 2021, are in various stages of development and likely would not debut until 2023.[29] By August 2021, Marvel Studios was planning a Halloween-themed special, to feature a Latino actor and begin production in early 2022. It is reportedly centered on the character Werewolf by Night.[127]

Additionally, after the shut down of Marvel Television, ABC said that it remained committed to featuring Marvel content.[18] In January 2020, ABC Entertainment president Karey Burke said that talks were beginning with Feige and Marvel Studios about what a Marvel Studios series on ABC would be, but she noted that Marvel's focus was on the Disney+ series.[133]

Series approach[edit]

Feige described Marvel Studios' approach to their television series in January 2021, explaining that streaming on Disney+ gave Marvel Studios flexibility with the formats for each series. He said some were being developed as "one off" miniseries that were intended to lead into feature films,[134][135] though additional seasons could be added to these in the future.[136] Other series were always intended to cover multiple seasons while still being connected to the films,[134] such as Loki.[128] These could have several years between the release of seasons, similar to series like Game of Thrones and Stranger Things.[134] Feige added that each miniseries or season was intended to be around six hours of content, but this would be split in different ways depending on the story being told, such as six hour-long episodes, or nine or ten half-hour episodes.[112][137] Marvel Studios' earliest series were directed by a single person, but later series have multiple directors taking on different numbers of episodes. Feige said this happened due to a combination of logistics, the needs of each story, and the studio's "own internal learnings of making longform television". He said the studio would continue varying the number of directors on future series as needed.[135]

Marvel Studios uses the term "head writer" instead of the traditional showrunner title, since they approach their television series as if they were six hour-long films. They encourage the series' directors to be in the writers room and part of the creative process (much like the feature films) in addition to Feige and the Marvel Studios executives assigned to each series.[138] This approach was confirmed by WandaVision head writer Jac Schaeffer,[139]The Falcon and the Winter Soldier director Kari Skogland,[138] and Loki director Kate Herron,[140] with Skogland describing the approach as "effective and efficient" since the series are too much for a single showrunner to take on.[138] Despite the head writer term, each series has multiple writers and a writers room that the head writer leads, and they also use "created for television by" credits for the head writers.[139][141] Explaining the decision-making process and hierarchy for Marvel Studios' first three series, Loki head writer Michael Waldron said the head writer of each series would have final say on creative decisions before filming began. At that point, the series shifted to a "more feature centric model" where the director takes on the role that a traditional showrunner might have and has the final say for creative decisions while on set and in post-production,[141] with the head writer still present on set for any necessary rewrites and during post-production.[138][139][141]

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^A version of the first two episodes debuted in IMAX theaters on September 1, 2017, and ran for two weeks, before their television premiere on ABC on September 29.[32]
  2. ^Production of Helstrom was moved to Marvel Studios following the shut down of Marvel Television, with executives from Marvel Television staying on to supervise the completion of the series.[18]

References[edit]

  1. ^Andreeva, Natalie (June 28, 2010). "Marvel Entertainment Launches TV Division". Deadline Hollywood. Archived from the original on January 9, 2016. Retrieved January 9, 2016.
  2. ^ abAndreeva, Nellie (August 28, 2012). "ABC Greenlights 'S.H.I.E.L.D' Marvel Pilot, Joss Whedon To Co-Write & Possibly Direct". Deadline Hollywood. Archived from the original on August 29, 2012. Retrieved August 28, 2012.
  3. ^ abGoldberg, Lesley (January 17, 2014). "Marvel's 'Agent Carter': Hayley Atwell, Writers, Showrunners Confirmed for ABC Drama". The Hollywood Reporter. Archived from the original on May 10, 2014. Retrieved January 18, 2014.
  4. ^ abGoldberg, Lesley (April 1, 2014). "'Agents of SHIELD' EPs Respond to Critics: Don't Expect a Marvel Movie Every Week". The Hollywood Reporter. Archived from the original on September 27, 2014. Retrieved September 27, 2014.
  5. ^Masters, Kim; Belloni, Matthew (August 31, 2015). "Marvel Shake-Up: Film Chief Kevin Feige Breaks Free of CEO Ike Perlmutter (Exclusive)". The Hollywood Reporter. Archived from the original on September 2, 2015. Retrieved August 31, 2015.
  6. ^Fischer, Russ (August 31, 2015). "Kevin Feige Wins More Control at Marvel Studios in Behind the Scenes Restructuring". /Film. Archived from the original on September 3, 2015. Retrieved December 15, 2019.
  7. ^Goldberg, Lesley (January 5, 2015). "'Agent Carter' Showrunners Grilled By 'Arrow' Producer in Honest, Wide-Ranging Interview". The Hollywood Reporter. Archived from the original on January 8, 2015. Retrieved January 7, 2015.
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Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Marvel_Cinematic_Universe_television_series

Tv 2016 marvel new shows

Marvel's Netflix television series

American streaming television series

Marvel's Netflix television series are a set of interconnected American television series created for the streaming service Netflix, based on characters that appear in publications by Marvel Comics. Produced by Marvel Television and ABC Studios, they are set in the Marvel Cinematic Universe (MCU) and acknowledge the continuity of the franchise's films and other television series. Marvel collectively refers to the group of shows as the "Marvel Street-Level Heroes" or "Marvel Knights" series.

A deal between Marvel and Netflix to produce several interconnected series was announced in November 2013, with the individual series Daredevil (2015–2018), Jessica Jones (2015–2019), Luke Cage (2016–2018), and Iron Fist (2017–2018) culminating in the crossover miniseries The Defenders (2017). A spin-off from Daredevil, The Punisher (2017–2019), was ordered in April 2016. The series were all filmed in New York State, forming the state's largest television production commitment with 161 episodes between them. Starring in the series are Charlie Cox as Matt Murdock / Daredevil, Krysten Ritter as Jessica Jones, Mike Colter as Luke Cage, and Finn Jones as Danny Rand / Iron Fist, who all star together in The Defenders, as well as Jon Bernthal as Frank Castle / Punisher. Many actors have roles across the different series, including Rosario Dawson who signed a special deal with Marvel to do so.

The series are believed to have generated strong viewership for Netflix, who do not release exact viewership details, and received positive reviews for their casts and darker take on the MCU. There were some common criticisms of the series, such as for their pacing. Netflix had cancelled all of the series by February 2019, as Marvel's parent company Disney was preparing its own streaming service Disney+. Contractually, Marvel had to wait two years before they could use the characters without Netflix.

Development[edit]

By October 2013, Marvel Television was preparing four drama series and a miniseries, totaling 60 episodes, to present to video on demand services and cable providers, with Netflix, Amazon, and WGN America expressing interest.[1] In November 2013, Marvel's parent company Disney was set to provide Netflix with live-action series based on Daredevil, Jessica Jones, Iron Fist, and Luke Cage, leading up to a crossover miniseries based on the Defenders.[2] Disney CEO Bob Iger explained that Disney had chosen Netflix to air the shows when they realized that the audience of the streaming service would provide a way to "grow the popularity of the characters".[3]

Marvel Television head Jeph Loeb later stated that Marvel was not "interested in making four pilots and then hoping someday that they could all get together. Netflix really understood what it is we wanted to do. They're very open to directors that might not have that same opportunity in broadcast television. The notion of having all 13 episodes at one time, particularly in serialized storytelling, is very appealing."[4] Loeb also added that the four characters "lent [themselves] to a world" due to their relationships and shared locale of New York City in the comics, but that the individual series would be different form one another because "the characters have different issues, different problems, different feelings about them". Loeb gave as an example the Marvel Cinematic Universe (MCU) films Captain America: The Winter Soldier and Guardians of the Galaxy (both 2014), on which he said, "I cannot think of two films that are more different in tone" than them, and yet "they feel very Marvel ... like, 'Oh, it is still the same universe that I'm in.'"[5]

Marvel's Joe Quesada confirmed in April 2014 that the Netflix series would be set within the MCU.[6] Loeb explained that "within the Marvel universe there are thousands of heroes of all shapes and sizes, but the Avengers are here to save the universe and Daredevil is here to save the neighborhood ... It does take place in the Marvel Cinematic Universe. It's all connected. But that doesn't necessarily mean that we would look up in the sky and see [Iron Man]. It's just a different part of New York that we have not yet seen in the Marvel movies."[7] In January 2015, Netflix COO Ted Sarandos said Netflix planned to release a Marvel series approximately a year apart from each other after Daredevil's April 2015 release.[8] A year later, Sarandos noted that the release schedules of the Marvel Netflix series are dependent on the "long production times and long post times. In some cases, when we have characters crossover, it makes it more difficult to manage production. It's not the goal to put out more than one or two [each] year ... The complex one is really The Defenders. The Defenders' production schedule will determine a lot of the season 2 and 3 output of those shows." He also noted on potential spin-offs that "all the characters in the universe could also spin out" into their own series at some point,[9] with Netflix ordering The Punisher, a spin-off from Daredevil, in April 2016.[10]

In May 2015, after starring as Claire Temple in the first season of Daredevil, Rosario Dawson signed with Marvel to return for the second season of the series as part of an "exclusive TV deal" that also allowed her to appear in any other Marvel Netflix series.[11] Dawson went on to appear in all of the series except The Punisher, linking them together similarly to Samuel L. Jackson's Nick Fury in the MCU films.[12] Dawson explained that she signed on with Marvel each year for a certain number of episodes, and found out which series the episodes were for closer to the time of filming.[13] Sarandos stated in July 2016 that Netflix was trying to close the gap between releases of Marvel seasons and was considering expanding to new series, but would always prioritize the quality of the shows over having more series and more releases per year.[14] That month, Marvel and Netflix committed to completing production on 135 episodes by the end of 2017, making the deal the largest television production commitment in New York State. Production for the different series engaged 500 local vendors and small businesses for various stages of development and required over 14,000 production-related hires.[15]

Series[edit]

Daredevil (2015–2018)[edit]

Main article: Daredevil (TV series)

Lawyer-by-day Matt Murdock uses his heightened senses from being blinded as a young boy to fight crime at night on the streets of Hell's Kitchen as Daredevil, juxtaposed with the rise of crime lord Wilson Fisk.[25] Murdock eventually crosses paths with Frank Castle / Punisher, a vigilante with far deadlier methods, and sees the return of his old girlfriend, Elektra Natchios.[26][27] When Wilson Fisk is released from prison, Murdock must decide between hiding from the world or embracing his life as a hero vigilante.[28]

In December 2013, Marvel announced that Drew Goddard would be the executive producer and showrunner for Daredevil, and would write and direct the first episode,[29] though at the end of May 2014, Goddard would no longer set to be the showrunner for the series and was replaced by Steven S. DeKnight. Goddard, who wrote the first two episodes, remained with the show as an executive producer.[16] A few days later, Charlie Cox was cast as Daredevil.[30] A second season was ordered on April 21, 2015, with Doug Petrie and Marco Ramirez taking over as showrunners from DeKnight, who could not return to the series due to a prior commitment.[17] A third season was ordered in July 2016,[31] with Erik Oleson taking over as showrunner of the series in October 2017.[18]

The first season, which debuted in its entirety on April 10, 2015,[32] features references to The Avengers (2012),[33] and mentions Carl "Crusher" Creel, a character from the MCU series Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.[34] The insignia for the Iron Fist antagonist Steel Serpent is also seen in the season.[35] The second season, which premiered on March 18, 2016,[36] features the motorcycle gang Dogs of Hell, who also appeared on Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.,[37] along with numerous references to the events of the first season of Jessica Jones.[38][39][40]Jon Bernthal co-stars as Frank Castle / Punisher,[41] before headlining his own series,[10] while Michelle Hurd and Carrie-Anne Moss reprise their roles of Samantha Reyes and Jeri Hogarth from Jessica Jones.[39][40] The third season was released on October 19, 2018.[42]

Jessica Jones (2015–2019)[edit]

Main article: Jessica Jones (TV series)

Melissa Rosenberg standing against a city background.
Melissa Rosenberg is Jessica Jones'creator and showrunner.

Jessica Jones suffers from post-traumatic stress disorder, so she opens her own detective agency to help people.[43] She begins to put her life back together after her encounter with Kilgrave, taking on a new case that makes her reluctantly confront her past.[44]

In November 2013, Melissa Rosenberg was announced as the writer and executive producer of the series,[19] and the following March, Loeb stated that filming would begin after Daredevil.[45] In December 2014, Krysten Ritter was cast as Jessica Jones in the series.[46] A second season was ordered on January 17, 2016,[47] and a third on April 12, 2018.[48]Scott Reynolds joined Rosenberg as co-showrunner for the third season.[20]

The first season, which debuted in its entirety on November 20, 2015,[49] features references to the events and characters of The Avengers,[50] and co-stars Mike Colter as Luke Cage before he headlined his own series.[51][43]Rosario Dawson reprises her Daredevil role of Claire Temple,[52] as does Royce Johnson in his role of Brett Mahoney.[53] The second season, which was released on March 8, 2018,[54] sees Elden Henson reprise his role of Franklin "Foggy" Nelson,[55] as well as Rob Morgan as Turk Barrett[56] and Tijuana Ricks as Thembi Wallace.[citation needed] The third season was released on June 14, 2019.[57]

Luke Cage (2016–2018)[edit]

Main article: Luke Cage (TV series)

When a sabotaged experiment gives him super strength and unbreakable skin, Luke Cage becomes a fugitive attempting to rebuild his life in Harlem, and must soon confront his past and fight a battle for the heart of his city.[58] After clearing his name, Cage becomes a hero and celebrity in Harlem, only to encounter a new threat that makes him confront the line between hero and villain.[59]

Colter reprises his role as Luke Cage in his own series.[43][51][60] In March 2014, Loeb stated that the series would begin filming after Iron Fist, being the fourth of the individual series.[45] By March 2015, it was instead slated to be the third of the individual series, beginning production after Jessica Jones.[17][61] The series was switched with Iron Fist after the positive reception Luke Cage received on Jessica Jones, becoming that series' breakout star and Marvel wanting to "follow the momentum".[62] Also in March, Cheo Hodari Coker was announced as showrunner and executive producer of the series.[21] A second season was ordered on December 3, 2016.[63]

The first season, which premiered on September 30, 2016,[64] features references to The Avengers, the second season of Daredevil, the first season of Jessica Jones, and a flier for Colleen Wing's martial arts class, and mentions Justin Hammer, Wilson Fisk, and Frank Castle.[65] Reprising their roles in the season are Dawson as Temple,[66] Morgan as Barrett, Rachel Taylor as Trish Walker, Stephen Rider as Blake Tower,[65]Parisa Fitz-Henley as Reva Connors,[67] and Danny Johnson as Ben Donovan.[68] The second season, which premiered on June 22, 2018,[59] features a reference to Detective Brigid O'Reilly from the MCU series Cloak & Dagger.[69][70]Finn Jones,[71]Jessica Henwick,[72] and Henson reprise their roles as Danny Rand, Colleen Wing, and Foggy Nelson in the season.[73]

Iron Fist (2017–2018)[edit]

Main article: Iron Fist (TV series)

Danny Rand returns to New York City, after being missing for fifteen years, to reclaim his family's company. However, when a threat emerges, Rand must choose between his family's legacy and his duties as the Iron Fist.[74]

In March 2014, Loeb stated that the series would begin filming after Jessica Jones as the third of the individual series.[45] By March 2015, it was expected to be the fourth of the individual series, entering production following Luke Cage.[17][61] The series was switched with Luke Cage after the positive reception Luke Cage received on Jessica Jones, becoming that series' breakout star and Marvel wanting to "follow the momentum".[62] In December 2015, Marvel announced that Scott Buck would serve as showrunner and executive producer of the series.[22] In February 2016, Finn Jones was cast as Rand.[75][76] A second season was revealed to be in development in July 2017,[77] with Raven Metzner announced as the new showrunner for the season, replacing Buck.[23]

The first season, which premiered on March 17, 2017,[74] makes references to the events of The Avengers, the Hulk, Stark Industries, Jessica Jones, Daredevil, Luke Cage, and Seagate Prison,[78] and mentions the Dogs of Hell biker gang, New York Bulletin editor-in-chief Mitchell Ellison and reporter Karen Page,[79]Roxxon Oil, and Midland Circle.[80][81] Events from the second season of Daredevil are also noted throughout.[78][81] Reprising their roles in the season are Moss as Hogarth,[82] Dawson as Temple,[83]Wai Ching Ho as Gao,[84] Marquis Rodriguez as Darryl,[85]Tijuana Ricks as Thembi Wallace, and Suzanne H. Smart as Shirley Benson. The second season, which was released on September 7, 2018,[86] sees Simone Missick reprise her role as Misty Knight.[77]

The Defenders (2017)[edit]

Main article: The Defenders (miniseries)

The superheroes Daredevil, Jessica Jones, Luke Cage, and Iron Fist team-up in New York City.[22]

The Defenders sees Cox, Ritter, Colter, and Jones reprise their roles as Matt Murdock / Daredevil, Jessica Jones, Luke Cage, and Danny Rand / Iron Fist, respectively, from the previous television series.[87] In March 2014, Loeb stated that the miniseries would begin filming after Iron Fist.[45][61] In April 2016, Marvel announced that Douglas Petrie and Marco Ramirez would act as showrunners for The Defenders. However, by the start of filming in New York City in October 2016,[89][90] Petrie had left the series as co-showrunner.[24] Filming concluded in March 2017.[91] The eight-episode event premiered on August 18, 2017.[92][93]

The miniseries also sees many supporting characters from the individual series reprise their roles, including, Deborah Ann Woll,[94] Henson,[95]Scott Glenn,[96]Élodie Yung,[97]Eka Darville,[98] Moss,[95] Taylor,[96] Simone Missick,[99]Jessica Henwick,[100] Dawson,[96] Ho,[101]Ramón Rodríguez,[102]Peter McRobbie,[103] Morgan,[104] Amy Rutberg, Susan Varon, and Nichole Yannetty as Karen Page, Foggy Nelson, Stick, Elektra Natchios, Malcolm Ducasse, Jeri Hogarth, Trish Walker, Misty Knight, Colleen Wing, Claire Temple, Gao, Bakuto, Lantom, Turk Barrett, Marci Stahl, Josie and Nicole, respectively. Midland Circle, which was referenced in previous Netflix series,[105][106] is revealed to be an operation of the Hand, who bought the building to search for the life substance hidden beneath the property.[106] The miniseries also references the events of The Avengers.[104]

The Punisher (2017–2019)[edit]

Main article: The Punisher (TV series)

Frank Castle is haunted and hunted after the murder of his family and becomes a vigilante known in the criminal underworld as "the Punisher", who aims to fight crime by any means necessary.[10][107]

By January 2016, ahead of the debut of Bernthal as armed vigilante Frank Castle / Punisher in the second season of Daredevil, Netflix was in "very early development" on a spin-off series and was looking for a showrunner. The series would be centered on Bernthal as Castle, and was described as a stand-alone series, outside of the series leading up to The Defenders.[108][109][9] Loeb implied that Marvel Television had not instigated the development of the spin-off and were focusing on making "the best 13 episodes of Daredevil season two" at the time, but did say, "I'm never going to discourage a network from looking at one of our characters and encouraging us to do more....If we are lucky enough that through the writing, through the direction, through the actor that people want to see more of that person, terrific."[110] In April 2016, Marvel and Netflix ordered The Punisher, along with confirming Bernthal's involvement and naming Steve Lightfoot as showrunner.[10] Filming began in Brooklyn, New York in October 2016,[111] and concluded in April 2017.[112] A second season was ordered on December 12, 2017.[113]

In the first season, which was released on November 17, 2017,[114] Woll and Morgan reprise their roles as Karen Page and Turk Barrett, respectively.[115][116] The second season was released on January 18, 2019.[117]

Recurring cast and characters[edit]

Further information: List of Marvel Cinematic Universe television series actors (Marvel Television) § Netflix series

List indicator(s)

This section includes characters who have appeared in at least two series and as a member of the main cast for at least one of those.

  • A dark grey cell indicates the character was not in the series.
  • G indicates a guest appearance in the series.
  • An R indicates a recurring role in the series.
  • V indicates a voice-only role.

Reception[edit]

For more details on the reception of each series, see the "Reception" section on each series' article.

With the release of the second season of Daredevil, Brian Lowery of Variety felt the Netflix series "have already leapfrogged ABC's forays into the Marvel universe in terms of their appeal, in part by tapping into the avid fan base that supports pay models and doesn't need to be spoon-fed plot points. In the process, they have demonstrated that it's possible to deliver a credible superhero show without a lot of pyrotechnics".[156] Following the release of Jessica Jones, David Priest at c|net wrote that the series rescues "Marvel from itself ... Jessica Jones takes big steps forward in terms of theme, craft and diversity. It's a good story first, and a superhero show second. And for the first time, the MCU seems like it matters."[157] For Paul Tassi and Erik Kain of Forbes, watching the series made them question the MCU, with Kain feeling that the "morally complex, violent, dark world of Jessica Jones has no place in the MCU ... right now, the MCU is holding back shows like Jessica Jones and Daredevil, while those shows are contributing absolutely nothing to the MCU."[158] Tassi went so far as to wonder what "the point of the Marvel Cinematic Universe" is, lamenting the lack of major crossovers in the franchise and saying that Jessica Jones is "so far removed from the world of The Avengers, it might as well not be in the same universe at all ... [I] really don't understand the point of [the MCU] if they're going to keep everything within it separated off in these little boxes".[159] Conversely, Eric Francisco of Inverse called Jessica Jones's lack of overt connections to the MCU "the show's chief advantage. Besides demonstrating how physically wide open the MCU's scope really is, Jessica Jones also proves the MCU's thematic durability."[160]

After the release of the first season of Luke Cage, The Atlantic's David Sims highlighted the pacing of Marvel's Netflix series, a common complaint from critics of all the series, stating, "After two seasons of Daredevil, one of Jessica Jones, and now one of Luke Cage, the Netflix model feels fundamentally flawed, encouraging the kind of molasses-slow plotting comic books are designed to eschew. The problem isn't that these shows are bad, necessarily... But they all take far too long to get going, by which point many viewers will have already tuned out." He felt one of the problems was the fact that Netflix does not rely on viewers tuning into a particular series as broadcast series do each week, but rather subscribers who, if they lose interest, "can take as long as they want to catch up... as long as they keep paying their subscription fee every month." The Netflix series are also afforded the opportunity to explore elements in more detail, with Sims noting "A lot of this detail [is] good, but it could have been considerably compressed—none of the Marvel Netflix series, so far, would have lost much by being squeezed into 10 episodes, or even 8. If Netflix shaved the 60-minute running time down quite a bit, it would likely inspire more economical—and better—storytelling from its shows." Sims concluded by saying, "What's most frustrating of all is that Netflix isn't getting rid of this approach anytime soon. Daredevil season three, Jessica Jones season two, Iron Fist, and The Punisher are all on their way, and each will follow the same 13-episode structure... The only respite may come in the form of The Defenders, a planned crossover series... over the course of just eight episodes. Who knows? The show might even surprise viewers and explain its villain's motivations within the first hour. Until then, fans will be stuck needlessly giving over entire days to these series, while others are deterred from watching at all."[161]

In her review for the first season of Iron Fist, Allison Keene of Collider spoke of the Marvel Netflix series' more grounded tone "than what we typically expect from a superhero show (like DC's candy-colored [Arrowverse] on The CW)", which misses a key element expected of superhero series: "this should be fantastical entertainment".[162] With The Defenders, Jeff Jansen of Entertainment Weekly felt many improvements were made in response to the common complaints the previous seasons received. He said, "The Defenders is far from perfect. But it's an enjoyable superhero adventure distinguished by improvements and innovations that I hope Marvel will carry forward. Shorter seasons. More team-ups. Fewer shows. Start the consolidation by letting go of Iron Fist. If Danny Rand must persist, add him to the other shows and let the stronger players carry him."[163]

Potential projects and crossovers[edit]

Television series[edit]

Netflix CCO Ted Sarandos stated in January 2016 that "all the characters in the universe" could receive their own spin-off series,[9] and that July he added that Netflix was open to exploring the MCU beyond the Defenders series, including potential crossovers with ABC's Marvel series.[14] Netflix vice president of original content Cindy Holland reiterated in July 2018 that there were always ongoing discussions regarding creating more spin-offs for characters from their Marvel series.[164] That September, Loeb stated that he would like to make a Daughters of the Dragon series for Netflix, featuring Jessica Henwick's Colleen Wing and Simone Missick's Misty Knight.[165]

Feature films[edit]

When the Marvel-Netflix deal was announced in November 2013, Iger indicated that if the characters proved popular they could go on to star in feature films.[3] In March 2015, Loeb stated that the series would start out self-contained since "the audience needs to understand who all of these characters are and what the world is before you then start co-mingling".[166] In September 2015, Marvel Studios' Kevin Feige said the films referencing the television series was inevitable, but "the schedules do not always quite match up to make that possible [since] by the time we start doing a movie, they'd be mid-way through a season. By the time our movie comes out, they'd be [starting the next season]."[167]

In April 2016, Marvel Studios revealed that Alfre Woodard would appear in Captain America: Civil War (2016), having already been cast as Mariah Dillard in Luke Cage the previous year.[168] This "raised hopes that Marvel could be uniting its film and Netflix universes",[169] with "one of the first and strongest connections" between the two.[168] However, Civil War writers Christopher Markus and Stephen McFeely revealed that Woodard would instead be portraying Miriam Sharpe in the film, explaining that she had been cast on the suggestion of Robert Downey, Jr., and they had not learnt of her casting in Luke Cage until afterwards.[168] This was not the first instance of actors being cast in multiple roles in the MCU, but this casting was called more "significant", and seen by many as a "disappointing" indication of "the growing divide" and "lack of more satisfying cooperation" between Marvel Studios and Marvel Television following the September 2015 corporate reshuffling of Marvel Entertainment that saw Marvel Studios become its own entity under Disney.[168][170]

Eric Carroll, producer on Spider-Man: Homecoming (2017), felt with the introduction of Queens-based Spider-Man to the MCU it "would be really fun" to make mention of the Defenders based in Manhattan, adding, "it's definitely a card I would love to see played, if not sooner rather than later."[171] In January 2017, Vincent D'Onofrio, who portrays Wilson Fisk in Daredevil, said he "would love to switch over to the movies, but I think it's pretty much been said it's not going to happen. Or at least not for a very, very long time." D'Onofrio cited Feige's previous reasoning as well as the fact that the films already had difficulty "bringing big characters in that they have to service in the writing" and adding characters from the television series would be "just too many characters" since the films were "trying to figure out already how to individualize more and at the same time keep The Avengers going".[172] Loeb said in October that the television series do not show Avengers Tower in New York City as the films do because Marvel Television wanted to be "less specific" about their characters' relationships to the tower and indicate that "this could be on any street corner ... where you would not be able to see the tower, even though it exists.[173]

When Feige first announced the crossover film Avengers: Infinity War (2018), he said the opportunity "certainly" exists for characters in the Netflix series to appear in that film,[174] and actors such as Krysten Ritter of Jessica Jones expressed interest in doing this.[175]Daredevil's Charlie Cox revealed that he and other actors with Marvel Television were contractually obliged to appear in a Marvel film if asked.[176]Infinity War co-director Anthony Russo stated that including television characters in Infinity War would be complicated by Marvel Studios and Marvel Television having separate oversight.[177] The "briefest consideration" to including television characters in the film was ultimately made, but the directors stated that it was "practically impossible",[178][179] and decided to just focus on crossing-over the characters from previous films instead.[179]

Cancellations and future[edit]

In October 2018, Netflix canceled Iron Fist, with Deadline Hollywood reporting that Disney was considering reviving the series on its streaming service Disney+.[180] Sarandos confirmed that the series were Netflix's to renew or cancel if they wished, and the company was "super happy with [the other series'] performance so far".[181] Despite this, Luke Cage was canceled by the streamer a week after Iron Fist was. Deadline Hollywood reported there were no plans to revive the series on Disney+ as with Iron Fist.[182] Shortly after, at the end of November 2018, Netflix canceled Daredevil, with Deadline Hollywood again reporting there was the potential for the series to be revived on Disney+.[183] Conversely, The Hollywood Reporter felt it was unlikely the series would be revived on Disney+ and also noted the two other remaining series at the time (Jessica Jones and The Punisher) would remain on Netflix "until they run their course".[184]Variety added that, per the original deal between Marvel and Netflix for the series, the characters cannot appear in any non-Netflix series or films for at least two years following their cancellation.[185][186]Kevin A. Mayer, chairman of Walt Disney Direct-to-Consumer and International, noted that, while it had not yet been discussed, it was a possibility that Disney+ could revive the cancelled Netflix series.[187] Netflix canceled both Jessica Jones and The Punisher on February 18, 2019.[188]

Loeb stated in August 2019 that Marvel Television had been "blindsided" by the cancellation of the series which "weren't finished yet", and the company had believed that the situation could be an end for them until they had several new series ordered by Hulu in a similar model to the original Marvel-Netflix deal. Loeb said there were future series being developed by Marvel Television that could be classified as "Marvel Street-Level Heroes" or "Marvel Knights" series just like the Marvel-Netflix series. He added, "however history's going to remember the story, all that's important to us is that we had an opportunity to change television by putting together four heroes, who then joined together in a group".[189] In January 2021, Feige said "never say never" to potentially reviving the series, but noted Marvel Studios was focused on their new Disney+ series announced at that time.[190] He also said "everything is on the board" in terms of the characters reappearing in Marvel Studios properties, and felt there were "some great characters and actors" from the Netflix series.[191]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

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Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marvel%27s_Netflix_television_series
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