Bmw r1200rt 2006 specs

Bmw r1200rt 2006 specs DEFAULT

BMW R1200RT (2005 - 2009) Review

MCN rating5 out of 5(5/5)

Owners' rating4 out of 5(4/5)

SpecsOwners' reviewsBikes for saleFor sale

BMW R1200RT motorcycle review - Riding

14

At a glance

Prices

Overall rating

Next up: Ride & brakes

5 out of 5(5/5)

Author: MCN Staff

Published: 23 November 2006

Updated: 21 November 2014

All-new successor to able but bland BMW R1150RT was one of the surprise highlights of BMW’s 2005 motorcycle range. It was not only faster and lighter, the ergonomics and handling package is excellent too. Not just a great tourer, a great motorcycle, period.

Ride quality & brakes

Next up: Engine

4 out of 5(4/5)

Along with more power – came much reduced weight with the BMW R1200RT. A full 20kg has been slashed which transforms handling. Steering is sharp, it’s a much more flickable motorcycle than before and yet stability is as good as ever. The BMW R1200RT is great to hustle. It’s also great to cruise thanks to BMW’s plush Telelever/Paralever suspension set-up.

Engine

Next up: Reliability

4 out of 5(4/5)

New 1200 version of the BMW R1150RT, as debuted on the BMW R1200GS the year before, delivered 110bhp, 15% up on the old 1150 engine. And you notice it, too. The BMW R1200RT is vigorous and lively, yet with the same reliability and flexibility as ever – still no missile, though. If you want that, get a BMW K1200GT.

Reliability & build quality

Next up: Value

4 out of 5(4/5)

BMW R1200RT are good, although sometimes not quite as good as the reputation suggests… There have been no BMW R1200RT scare stories yet and metal and paint finishes are as good as any motorcycle, but you still need to fight off salt corrosion in winter.

Value vs rivals

Next up: Equipment

4 out of 5(4/5)

The thick end of £10K is a lot of money for a 110bhp twin cylinder touring motorcycle, especially when heated grips, stereo etc cost extra. But the BMW R1200RT is a stonking motorcycle that’ll go on forever and maintain its value. If you buy a BMW R1200RT, you won’t regret it. Find a BMW R1200RT for sale.

Equipment

4 out of 5(4/5)

It’s a BMW motorcycle tourer, so there’s the best of everything on the BMW R1200RT… if you pay the extra. In stock trim, however, the BMW R1200RT is still very comfortable thanks to comprehensive instrumentation, effective screen and mirrors and, best of all, the sumptious and usefully height adjustable seat. Every motorcycle should have one. Compare and buy parts for the R1200RT in the MCN Shop.

BMW R1200RT for sale with MCN

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Specs

Engine size1170cc
Engine type8v boxer twin, 6 gears
Frame typeSteel tubular type
Fuel capacity27 litres
Seat height780mm
Bike weight229kg
Front suspensionPreload
Rear suspensionPreload, rebound
Front brake2 x 310mm discs
Rear brakeSingle 265mm disc
Front tyre size120/70 x 17
Rear tyre size180/60 x 17

Mpg, costs & insurance

Average fuel consumption43 mpg
Annual road tax£96
Annual service cost£260
New price-
Used price £3,500 - £7,000
Insurance group 11 of 17
How much to insure?
Warranty termTwo year unlimited mileage

Top speed & performance

Max power110 bhp
Max torque85 ft-lb
Top speed135 mph
1/4 mile acceleration12.2 secs
Tank range190 miles

Model history & versions

Model history

2005: BMW R1200RT launched.

Owners' reviews for the BMW R1200RT (2005 - 2009)

26 owners have reviewed their BMW R1200RT (2005 - 2009) and rated it in a number of areas. Read what they have to say and what they like and dislike about the bike below.

Review your BMW R1200RT (2005 - 2009)

Summary of owners' reviews

Overall rating: 4 out of 5(4/5)
Ride quality & brakes: 4.4 out of 5(4.4/5)
Engine: 4.4 out of 5(4.4/5)
Reliability & build quality: 4 out of 5(4/5)
Value vs rivals: 3.7 out of 5(3.7/5)
Equipment: 4.8 out of 5(4.8/5)
Annual servicing cost: £260
4 out of 5Everything you have read is true o (best tourer)

12 September 2020by Mr S D Moore

Version: SE

Year: 2008

Annual servicing cost: £140

Sublime tourer, handling is amazing considering the size. Some vibration.

Ride quality & brakes4 out of 5

The most I did was 250 miles when it requires a refuel still comfortable

Engine4 out of 5

Torque everywhere and plenty fast enough, cruise at 100mph is completely unstressful

Reliability & build quality5 out of 5

Value vs rivals4 out of 5

I do all the services myself.

Equipment4 out of 5

Electronic suspension is greatCruise control is also very handy in Europe

Buying experience: Bought from non franchised dealer. Used 20000 miles immaculate condition £6000 when it was 9 years old

4 out of 5Long term relationship.

24 July 2020by Bertie

Version: Fully Equipped radio CD player

Year: 2005

Annual servicing cost: £200

Comfort and weather protection

Ride quality & brakes3 out of 5

Breaks are not as good as they used to be dispite changing the fluid.

Engine4 out of 5

73.000 miles on her now. One coil pack has just started to misfire so that will be changed next.

Reliability & build quality2 out of 5

Now with 73.000 miles on it the throttle body stuck on full revs. Striped down and cleaned works perfectly fine now. Some corrosion has started on the frame and rear foot pegs.

Value vs rivals4 out of 5

Service every year by me cost of bits plus tyres when required. Everyday rider.

Equipment5 out of 5

Radio and CD player on this bike. I would rather by a cheap MP3 player instead of ticking this box again.

Buying experience: Dealer very good choice of bikes.

3 out of 5great ride but let down by big problems with big repair bills

21 July 2020by newfazerfan

Year: 2007

i bought a 2007 r1200rt with full BMW service history and 32,000 miles, its really comfy to ride smooth on long motorways and easy to handle on the back roads, the reason I have score so low is the problems, the problems I have had are - final drive failing, fuel gauge not working, intermittent electrical problems, ESA not working these problems are all over the forums and are normal faults with the r1200rt these problems are not cheap to fix,

Ride quality & brakes5 out of 5

Engine4 out of 5

Reliability & build quality1 out of 5

Value vs rivals2 out of 5

Equipment5 out of 5

Equipment is good when it works

Buying experience: I px my 2006 CBR1100 plus £1000 for the RT wish I never now.

2 out of 5Avoid

21 June 2020by elviswasmynan

Year: 2006

Annual servicing cost: £150

Made of biscuits and twigs

Ride quality & brakes1 out of 5

Has to be 1 because of the servo brakes

Engine4 out of 5

Really nice

Reliability & build quality1 out of 5

I sought the advice of two respected independent BMW specialists before buying one and they both told me the same thing - walk away. Why didn't I listen! They told me a list of things that would definitely fail, and a list that would probably fail - how right they were. Fuel pump control unit, fuel strip, servo brakes, ZFE, cheap wheel bearings and worst of all cheap gearbox bearings.

Value vs rivals1 out of 5

Plus thousands more for faults

Equipment5 out of 5

As you'd expect from a full-dress tourer

Buying experience: The seller was great, the buyer was an idiot.

3 out of 5Long term BMW R1200RT rider.

12 June 2020by Bertie

Year: 2005

Annual servicing cost: £250

My bike has 77889 miles on it at the moment.

Ride quality & brakes4 out of 5

The breaks are good they can stop this bike very quickly and the abs only cuts in when on loose material. The esp has cut in twice once on some oil on a roundabout the second time setting off from some traffic lights on a very wet and cold winters morning.

Engine5 out of 5

As long ad the oil air and plugs are changerd regularly the engine just keeps going

Reliability & build quality4 out of 5

Bolts starting with corrosion. One heated grip failed. Speakers failed so fitted a aux socket for head phones.

Value vs rivals4 out of 5

Service the bike myself. Oil air fuel filter changed along with plugs and break pads and one new headlight bulb.

Equipment4 out of 5

I love Michael tyres on this bike I get loads of feel from them and I can get around 10000 miles from the back and 12000 from the front. Rado and CD player is brilliant on long distance trips the heated grips and seat are fantastic in winter.

Buying experience: I got this from a dealer I got £500 off the advertised price because it needed a new rear tyre.

5 out of 5R1200RT LE 2009. Love or loathe them

02 May 2020by Jonny smudge Smith

Version: LE. (Limited Edition)

Year: 2009

I've given it 5 out of 5 because it's a 'do everything' bike. With quality build and ride. With exceptional economy from a 1200 motor. But more of that later. I have read the 1150 can be a somewhat very different bike to ride. And not for the better. Having not ridden one I cant compare. So, the worst bits. Hmmm, this may depend on you're body height and inside leg length. For me i find the seat, which has 2 height settings, uncomfortable after 2 hrs riding. I ride on the higher setting, which gives my legs (32") more room. Having bought a re positioning kit for the pegs, which I have yet to fit, should give me even more of a relaxed feel. It's all to do with the angles at you ankle-knee and hip. And soon to be 54 yrs young, I sold my Apprilia 1000cc Falco. Fantastic bike. But my joints don't like it nowadays. In favour of a new love in a R1200RT. I use a Air Hawk seat for touring. Which easily doubles my riding before a leg stretch is needed. Also I found the original screen not wide or tall enough, in that it also produced too much wind noise. (And I ride with ear plugs) Easy fix with a touring screen. So much quieter. And now only my shoulders get a little wet in doen pours. otherwise I stay perfectly dry. Quite amazed. The BMW Canbus system can deplete the bike battery in 2 to 3 wks. This is without the alarm armed. Probably with all canbus systems. Fit a trickle charger. They reckon £1 usage for a year. No brainer. Just check if its not canbus compatible, you'll have to plug it direct to the bikes battery. The bike is a little tall and the weight could catch you out. Just check before you go to put you're foot down on the tarmac that it's not a adverse camber. I nearly dropped mine because of this. Lesson learnt. The bmw luggage top box and panniers are heavy. But the quality is top end. And lastly. The indicators. I prefer the original single indicator button instead of one on each side of the handle bars (like harley) they went back to the original method a few years later. BEST BITS. Everything else :) My 09 RT is exceptional. Especially after making some inexpensive changes. Build quality is the best I've ever had. Still polishes up like new. It gets a BMW service every 2 years. That's it. And in 7 years ownership its cost me 2 new headlight bulbs. Which bmw fitted for free. Ride. So smooth and positive in the bends. A very easy bike to ride. Almost pilots itself. I've never been cold on this bike. So good is the protection from the elements. And at the press of a button, I can change riding modes whilst riding. And height adjustment for passenger or passenger and luggage while stationary. All electronically. A first for me, and very useful. At 110 Bhp I can cruise 90-100 effortlessly. (On the Autobahns ofcourse) still maintaining very good fuel economy of around 50mpg. My 09 LE (limited edition) they only built 200. And is the one bmw threw every accessory at, factory fitted, to sell off the last of the air cooled single cam engine. All the normal bmw gadgetry, plus Tyre pressure display read out. Sat nav. Full audio system Cruise control. 2 x panniers and full size top box all colour coded. In metallic black. I'm sure all 200 were this colour. Would I recommend to a friend. Or anyone for that matter. Ofcourse I would. There is so much more I could say about this bike. All positive. Having toured on mine for thousands of miles. Also used for local runs etc. I doubt I will ever part with this bike. It's just too good.

Ride quality & brakes5 out of 5

Outstanding stopping power. And ride quality, as stated earlier, is sift enough for all day riding. But hard enough for sportier back lane chasing. One of the best ways to measure a bikes comfort. Ask the pillion.

Engine4 out of 5

Some say the engine is let down by that clunky gearbox. Which is why I dropped a point. However, I see it as a characteristic of the bike dating back to the 70's. And it has never stopped these engines covering big miles of 100k plus. The bike does not falter on the road during any manoeuvre. And always gives good feedback to the rider. The front end/wheel can feel a little light. Maybe even vague to some. All depends what they ridden previously. This bike was made to tour. Slow or fast. And it does just that, in true bmw fashion. The bike just works, especially in the comfort factors for me. Heated seat and grips. Keeps me warm and fresh at the other end when many of my friends seem cold and haggard from the same miles. The upright riding position gives me a great view. taking in all the scenery, which is a big part of bike touring for me. Fantastic Wind protection means I'm not hanging on straining my neck muscles. Nor do I get the notorious pushing on the back created by negative air pressure in the cockpit. And with ear plugs, I listen to the radio mostly, even at higher speeds and having engaged cruise control. Relaxed taking it all in. Often made my fellow riders a little envious. The engine is under stressed and never seems to get to busy, even for this opposing twin.

Reliability & build quality5 out of 5

This bike has never gone wrong. Long may it stay that way. From the wheels, engine fixings, chrome and paintwork. I am more than very impressed. I ride through winter. And always comes out gleaming each spring. BMW servicing is less than £300 every 2 years. And change what ever needs changing as per the service schedule.

Value vs rivals4 out of 5

I would have given 5 out of 5 had the servicing been free :) Always free decent coffee while you wait. Often biscuits and donuts. Exceptionally friendly with any advice on tap.

Equipment5 out of 5

No question about it. Equipment levels here are top of the range for quality and longevity. Remember, mine came fully loaded. And i use it, all the gadgets. Didn't think I would, but then I'd never had all this bike equipment before. Certainly wouldn't want to be without it now. Especially for mile munching.

Buying experience: I bought mine from bmw in Norwich. Can't say enough good things about them. From first glance out the corner of my eye on the bike. I had only gone there for a cuppa as it was their open day. Amd had no intention of buying yet another bike. But the draw to the bike, hearing it say "try me for size" was only going to have one outcome. 7 yrs on I enjoy and admire the bike more each day. The older it gets the more appealing it is to me.

5 out of 5R1200RT 05"

13 May 2019by Jimbob

Year: 2005

Annual servicing cost: £200

So comfortable, surprisingly nimble and nippy too. Great tourer and commuter, mine has the abs and heated grips only, but no complaints from me. Best bike I've ever had.....

Ride quality & brakes5 out of 5

Brakes are fantastic and hot, ride is so smooth and stable on all surfaces and in the rain, including gravel car parks etc too. So surprising for a beast of this size and weight

Engine5 out of 5

A motorway plodder, purrs all day and plenty of torque for a good thrash too when required. Such a flexible set up, and reliable too.

Reliability & build quality5 out of 5

Fantastic quality, reliability and usability too. I have the top box too, so handy. Never done me wrong

Value vs rivals5 out of 5

Had a few japs before, cheaper bmw servicing than the japs. Great on fuel, very economical in town and on runs.

Equipment5 out of 5

On mine i have the factory heated grips, electric screen and abs. Would have been nice with cruise and the radio, but so happy i don't miss it.

Buying experience: I got mine from a dealer, went to see a hayabusa and came away with my RT. Always wanted one, and fell in love when i see it in the gun metal grey. Servicing is easy and not painful from my dealer, cannon Bmw who are great for everything, including free coffee and advice.

4 out of 5Great tourer.

29 August 2017by nanookofthenorth

Version: SE

Year: 2008

Annual servicing cost: £180

Expensive to repair. Clutch worn out by previous owner riding in London. Over a grand to replace, and that's not by a BMW dealer. When fixed, it became the bike I wish I'd always had - quick beyond its appearance, comfy, great handling and with a good road presence, especially with additional LED spots added. Luggage as good as it gets. Easy to add mods such as 12v power socket (not one of the silly BMW DIN ones). I love it.

Ride quality & brakes5 out of 5

Comfy on long trips despite my ageing hips. With all the toys (except audio) it makes long trips easy, the electronically adjustable suspension definitely makes a difference to me and the traction control has (probably) saved my bacon a couple of times when accelerating across wet drain covers.

Engine5 out of 5

Nothing but torque, torque, torque.

Reliability & build quality5 out of 5

But when something does go wrong, expect to empty your bank account.

Value vs rivals5 out of 5

Servicing by independent BMW specialist quite reasonable. Normally get 55mpg and I don't hold back on the throttle. 60+ easily achievable. Considering that there are no chain/sprockets to replace, it's not bad.

Equipment5 out of 5

Buying experience: Bought privately knowing there were one or two issues. Unfortunately the worn clutch wasn't worn enough to slip when I test-rode it; that started about a thousand miles later. Check service history, check for oil leak around sight-glass. Check rear wheel bearings. If you get the chance to test ride, open the throttle wide in 4th or 5th at low revs - if the clutch slips, walk away or consider the £1000+ possible repair bill.

4 out of 5A Cracking Touring Machine

31 August 2016by Noodles

Year: 2008

Annual servicing cost: £425

Spectacular comfort and weather protection, with oodles of heating to keep the cold a bay. On first impressions the R1200RT is an enormous machine, edging on the side of intimidating; coming to BMW after years of Japanese bikes was a tough choice, but a good one none the less. If you have the inclination to ride quickly and show little fear for fast cornering, the bike is an engineering master piece, the electronic suspension is unbelievable at dealing with damping and rebound and offers the rider a very impressive cornering experience, far better then you would think was possible.

Ride quality & brakes5 out of 5

Braking is uneventful powerful and easily controlled, however you do need to remember this is a heavy bike, and at speed all the Electronic suspension and ABS aids aren't going to help if the distance you need to stop in is too short, fully loaded two up your getting close to 400+KG, Tank range is getting close to 300 miles and you can do this in comfort in one sitting.

Engine5 out of 5

On start up the boxer engine is a little agricultural and rocks, thrums and chugs but once on you way its a dream, i guess you could say it has character, something those inline 4's just don't offer. The engine comes with bags of torque and pulls pretty much in any gear, use the gears and the full rev range effectively a BMW R1200RT picks up speed at a staggering linear pace, it lacks the sports surge of insanity of the 1000cc's and up the in line 4's have.

Reliability & build quality5 out of 5

BMW Build quality is excellent and their attention to detail is second to none, the luggage fitment on the top box, panniers and tank bag is so simple. The gizmo's are just brilliant and make a world of difference to the riding experience: The heated grips, heated seats front and rear are very effective, the adjustable screen keeps the worst of the weather off and offers up excellent weather protection all round, cruise control (my first on a bike) is a little odd and takes some time getting use to, but my god what a brilliant idea, you really need to try it to appreciate it.

Value vs rivals3 out of 5

I'm lucky as I self service, have the tools and knowledge so the Dealer price of up to £425 is reduced to sub £200 keeping it inline with what i consider to be affordable.

Equipment5 out of 5

Purchasing a BMW R1200RT should pretty much comes ready to tour, inner bags are a must to simplify the transition between bike and accommodation, The top box if not fitted is worth the money, it offers your pillion a comfortable back rest and a lock up for two helmets, tyre's I run Michelin Pilot road 4 GT's offering excellent mileage and good grip.

Buying experience: I purchased my R1200RT privately for £5000 with 18000 miles on the ODO

5 out of 5A great Touring bike that is great fun on windy Welsh roads.

24 June 2016by Tony

Version: SE

Year: 2008

Annual servicing cost: £250

Handling once rolling is very good even at low speed but choose your parking spot well otherwise hauling approximately a quarter of a ton around is hard work on a slope!

Ride quality & brakes5 out of 5

Lovely ride quality for long journeys whether solo or two up. Excellent handling on the twisty roads too.

Engine5 out of 5

If you like a low revving, high torque engine, this is the one. Fuel consumption is excellent with consistent high 50s on tour.

Reliability & build quality5 out of 5

Good solid build quality, I have always garaged mine and washed it down after a ride, particularly in the winter.

Value vs rivals5 out of 5

Servicing is as much as a car but when you look at the spec of the bike, it's only missing two more wheels and a roof and it would be a car.

Equipment5 out of 5

Good level of equipment. Electric screen adjustment is a definitely an advantage in poor weather or if there are a lot of flies. Cruise control is excellent on European roads but I would be very careful using it on our crowded motorways.

Buying experience: Bought from Southport Superbikes, sadly no more. We negotiated a part-ex which we were both happy with. I don't recall figures now.

4 out of 5Great all rounder, low fuel consumption helps paying regular repair-bills

23 September 2015by Rob van Elst

Year: 2006

Annual servicing cost: £350

Looks like a big comfy tourer, but is, above all, a very good fun all-rounder; even more so than the GS. Unlike most modern tourers, the engine has quite a bit of quirky character too without making it less usable.

Ride quality & brakes4 out of 5

Surprisingly good all-rounder, easier to flick through packed traffic than GS for example. Comfy on long distances, even though seat leaves little options for moving around / changing position.

Engine5 out of 5

It's quite a lot slower than say a Pan, a VFR1200 or FJR1300 but there is always enough power when you need it. In that respect it's perfect. Tyres last forever compared to my VFR1200 as a bonus.

Reliability & build quality3 out of 5

Quality and general finish are "inconsistent" at best (for example good paint on plastics but loads of corrosion on forks, sub-frame, screws and engine; finish on shaft housing looks uneven and cheap); plenty of recurring issues with electrics (relays and other components, ignition coils) and drive (clutch, gearbox, end-drive) leading to regular (very) high repair bills. Modern BMWs seem mainly reliable in reputation, not half as good as my Honda VFR1200 for example.

Value vs rivals3 out of 5

Quite long intervals but needs BMW specialist really for proper servicing given the electronics/servo brakes. Prices seem unreasonably high for a bike with a relatively simple engine with easily accessible heads for valve clearance checks etc, BMW hourly rates are high. Great fuel consumption (60 mpg is quite well possible when spending lots of time on the motorway at legal(ish) speeds). Unlike other RTs, mine hardly uses any oil in between services.

Equipment5 out of 5

I thought I'd never use it but the cruise control is great on long trips. Otherwise has all gadgets you need, panniers are great. Headlight is great too, which seems a rarity on modern bikes.

Buying experience: I bought this 2nd hand from a (non-BMW) bike dealer with warranty, 40.000 miles 3 years ago, for £6000. It then had 30k on the clock.

5 out of 5

08 August 2015by Randall Walger

Year: 2006

Annual servicing cost: £500

I do recommend it and friend got one.

Ride quality & brakes5 out of 5

With the ABS I can hit the brakes as hard as I want..

Engine4 out of 5

Could do with a little more.. The water cooled version is ace.

Reliability & build quality5 out of 5

The overly fancy abs box failed. Expensive fix at 2 grand.

Value vs rivals5 out of 5

Mostly tyres and routine maintenance.

Equipment5 out of 5

Buying experience: Dealer. Traded in CBR1100 and got very good trade in. Got free top box 50 L color coded to main paint. I added hated seat, electronic suspension.

5 out of 5Great bike to go out on a long ride....very long ride

31 May 2013by DutchDiver

After 9 years I upgraded from my R1150R to a 2005 R1200RT. What a difference! The seat is more comfortable, the riding position has more feel, the engine is more responsive, the handling is better, brakes are better, the fuel range is much more and on top the screen is excellent when cruising! It's just a massive improvement across the board! Took the bike across Spain and Portugal and I actually didn't want to get off on any of the days. This bike will not disappoint and it loves being thrown into corners and eats them all up.... I already feel this is going to be my bike for he next 9 years

Ride quality & brakes5 out of 5

Engine4 out of 5

Reliability & build quality5 out of 5

Value vs rivals4 out of 5

Equipment5 out of 5

5 out of 5Bikes now for pleasure only

10 March 2010by Gordon1952

On my second RT1200 - truely fantastic bike. Perfect for cruising at 90+mph all day fully loaded 2 up. Also perfect for a weeks holiday in the worst rain imaginable in Scotland. Never got very wet. Perfect roadholding in the wet thanks to traction control. Never thought cruise control was right on a bike until I bought my LE version - cruise is perfect for 400 miles in a day continental touring - great to rest the right hand even for 5 minutes.Very frugal in fuel economy. In 4 years of owning RT1200's I have travelled 30000 miles without any mechanical problems. only downside is the awkward way of measuring oil level although the on board computer does register when the level becomes very low. Can't wait to get my next RT in 2011.Off to Italy for 3 weeks in August for some serious riding in the mountains.

Ride quality & brakes5 out of 5

Engine5 out of 5

Reliability & build quality5 out of 5

Value vs rivals4 out of 5

Equipment5 out of 5

5 out of 5Bikes now for pleasure only

10 March 2010by Gordon1952

On my second RT1200 - truely fantastic bike. Perfect for cruising at 90+mph all day fully loaded 2 up. Also perfect for a weeks holiday in the worst rain imaginable in Scotland. Never got very wet. Perfect roadholding in the wet thanks to traction control. Never thought cruise control was right on a bike until I bought my LE version - cruise is perfect for 400 miles in a day continental touring - great to rest the right hand even for 5 minutes.Very frugal in fuel economy. In 4 years of owning RT1200's I have travelled 30000 miles without any mechanical problems. only downside is the awkward way of measuring oil level although the on board computer does register when the level becomes very low. Can't wait to get my next RT in 2011.Off to Italy for 3 weeks in August for some serious riding in the mountains.

Ride quality & brakes5 out of 5

Engine5 out of 5

Reliability & build quality5 out of 5

Value vs rivals4 out of 5

Equipment5 out of 5

5 out of 5Back to bikes at 50

23 February 2010by JonathanRisley

I bought the 1200 RT after test riding it and a Honda Pan European and loved it from the start. I am 6 foot 3 and weight 16 stone so the only thing I needed to change was the screen. I found a bigger one at Nippy Normans. I have now done over 12000 miles with 3 trips to Spain including a non-stop Barcelona to home. I love the bike and feel relaxed and comfortable at all times.

Ride quality & brakes5 out of 5

Engine5 out of 5

Reliability & build quality5 out of 5

Value vs rivals4 out of 5

Equipment5 out of 5

5 out of 5An excellent all rounder

21 February 2010by Oliebloke

First off I'm 6ft 4 and 15 stone (I think these figures are important with bike reviews). The bike is a '59 LE (fully loading end of line). Ive had the bike since Oct 09 and have covered the best part of 2000miles on it so far. Its one of the best handling bikes I have ever ridden and the engine is fantastic for everything from cruising around country lanes to having a blast along A'roads and along tight n twisty B roads. Comfort is exceptional for both me and my lady, weather protection is fantastic. The screen does allow a little wind onto the helmet however it also can work to clear the rain I have found and there are aftermarket larger screens if it really annoys you. The only down side so far has been the reliability hasnt been fantastic with a knackered ABS Sensor and stuck indicator cancel switch however they were all sorted quickly and efficiently. I personally love this bike. If you are after a bike that can do abit of everything on road and still have quite abit of fun as well this is the bike for you.

Ride quality & brakes5 out of 5

Engine5 out of 5

Reliability & build quality4 out of 5

Value vs rivals5 out of 5

Equipment5 out of 5

4 out of 5So far so good

10 October 2009by Cobby

Had the RT for a month now, great equipment, love the ride, surprisingly quick. I even use the cruise control, which I didn't see the need for.

Ride quality & brakes4 out of 5

Engine4 out of 5

Reliability & build quality4 out of 5

Value vs rivals4 out of 5

Equipment5 out of 5

2 out of 5NEW 2009

29 September 2009by sportsboyuk

TEST RODE ONE IT BROKE DOWN SO THE DEALER GOT ME ANOTHER TO TEST AND YES IT BROKE DOWN AGAIN SO FOLLOWING WEEKEND HE SAID HERE TAKE THIS FOR THE DAY YES YES YES IT WENT MAJORLY WRONG, FAILED PANNIER, ELECTRICAL FAILIURE, AND WORST OF ALL THE FRONT PADS WENT IT HAD 480 MILES ON THE CLOCK SO I DIDNT BUY ONE I LEFT VERY DISSAPOINTED PS ENGINE POWER IS OOR TOO ODD BIKE BMW HAVE LOST THERE BUILD QAULITY AND THEY ARE EXPENSIVE NOT IMPRESSED

Ride quality & brakes4 out of 5

Engine1 out of 5

Reliability & build quality2 out of 5

Value vs rivals1 out of 5

Equipment5 out of 5

1 out of 5R1200RT Quality problems

14 June 2009by LesK

Bought an R1200RT new in 2005, since done 31k miles. ESA failed after 4 days, took BMW more than 2 years to make it work properly.Throttle jammed due to incorrect assembly. Horn bracket fractured. Starter motor failed. RHS indicator switch failed. OIl leaks. Front engine cover and rear wheel replaced due to corrosion problems. Fuel pump elelectronics failed. Wiring harness to ignition switch fractured. Needle roller on final drive failed. Blew 8 headlamp bulbs. BMW washed their hands of it after 2 years. Conclusion, lovely bike with totally unacceptable quality, good luck to prospective buyers, goodbye to BMW.....

Ride quality & brakes5 out of 5

Engine4 out of 5

Reliability & build quality1 out of 5

Value vs rivals2 out of 5

Equipment4 out of 5

4 out of 5Wind Blast

01 February 2009by all624

Got an RT SE last year for something different, bike is great, except..... the standard screen: The wind either hit me directly in the mouth at low3 setting, or at full tilt on the top of my helmet making it really unpleasant and I am only 6 foot tall. Put a Cee Bailey screen on with the largest size option and this has helped a lot but has killed fuel consumption and not so good in a side wind, which I can appreciate. When I tested one I thought that the screen was a bit low but thought that with a bit of fiddling I could sort it out, but no. The new screen also allows you to look through it rather than having the top edge of the standard screen vibrating in your line of sight.

Ride quality & brakes4 out of 5

Engine4 out of 5

Reliability & build quality5 out of 5

Value vs rivals4 out of 5

Equipment5 out of 5

5 out of 5R1200RT

09 April 2008by fambone

Had bike for over a year. Done some serious long milage around South Africa in December - super comfy, great power and wind protection for long trips. Also competent commuter but prefer its open road capabilities.

Ride quality & brakes4 out of 5

Engine5 out of 5

Reliability & build quality5 out of 5

Value vs rivals4 out of 5

Equipment5 out of 5

5 out of 5R1200RT

09 April 2008by fambone

Had bike for over a year. Done some serious long milage around South Africa in December - super comfy, great power and wind protection for long trips. Also competent commuter but prefer its open road capabilities.

Ride quality & brakes4 out of 5

Engine5 out of 5

Reliability & build quality5 out of 5

Value vs rivals4 out of 5

Equipment5 out of 5

4 out of 5R1200RT

02 September 2007by simon1hep

Done 15k miles on my 2nd hand Dec '05 1200RT from Vines (Guildford) without ANY reliability problems. Originally wanted a K1200S, but the pillion comfort was not much better than my Firestorm, so got the R1200RT old mans tourer! Can't say anything bad about it, but can't say much good about it? Terrific all rounder, but primarily designed as a one or two up long distance tourer. I use it daily throughout the year for work and the panniers and grip heaters are brilliant. Some quality issues, but items replaced under warranty, watch out for corrosion on footpeg support plate, engine front plate and fork stanchion legs. Bridgestone 020's better then the Conti Road Attack's, will try the B021's at next change. Have kept my sports bike for more spirited rides, but will always go on the BM when distance/luggage/rain are involved. Wind protection very good with the height adjustable screen, cruising at 80+ you can read a newspaper behind the screen! Given the choice purchase choice again, I would still go for the K1200S, but it is not as good as the RT for everyday and touring use. Handling surprisingly good once you get used to the bouncy suspension (in comparison to a sports bike) and very stable at all speeds. Main niggle at the moment is how to turn off the indicator auto-cancel 'feature', which is a pain in the a**e. Dealer says that they will have a look at cancelling it through the diagnostics at next service. If you want a comfy, quick (but not fast), ultra tourer, then give one a test ride. Bear in mind, if you haven't ridden a beemer, then it can take at least 500 miles to acclimatise to them (that's just the indicator switches), so don't expect miracles during a test ride.

Ride quality & brakes4 out of 5

Engine4 out of 5

Reliability & build quality3 out of 5

Value vs rivals4 out of 5

Equipment4 out of 5

2 out of 5Had my R1200ST 1st year service and was loaned an RT for the day...

13 April 2006by wwdph02

First impression on the ride home -  it seems to suffer more from sidewinds. Sat behind a large screen, tillers for handlebars and mirrors underneath. Played with the electric screen to find a spot where the wind noise and turbulance disappeared and rode home 30 miles. Collected my wife, her first opinion was that the seat was comfy but she felt unsafe, missed the grab handles from the ST and the RT's felt too low and under her legs which was uncomfortable. It didn't get much better I'm afraid as I found the brake/clutch span adjusters would not get as close to the bars as the ST and felt I was trying to steer a barge and Sally described it as sittng on a sofa. We had intended to have a full day out but just took it back to the dealership. Never been so glad to get my own bike back and even more grateful to see that after a year I am still happier with the ST! It felt far more responsive, under my control and has killed of any thoughts of ever buying a true tourer again. Strengths: Build quality and load carrying ability for continental trips, brakes, engine and proven reliability. Weaknesses: Too large and not much fun once you get to you destination and remove the panniers unlike other sport tourer type machines.

Ride quality & brakes4 out of 5

Engine4 out of 5

Reliability & build quality5 out of 5

Value vs rivals2 out of 5

Equipment4 out of 5

5 out of 5I have riden a Harley Dyna Glide for the last 5 years but needed a touring bike.

06 January 2006by phillw

I have never liked the BMW RT range. Being short of leg they have always seemed far to big and cumbersome for me to ride safetly. Problem I had was I wanted to tour two up and the wife could not get comfortable on the Harley. Enter the 1200 RT. The dealer suggested lower suspension plus the low seat option, had a ride on one and was totaly won over. So easy to ride especially at low speed and brilliant at motorway speeds. Spoke to Ohlins (Harris Performance) and they supplied the front/rear shocks 1.5 ins shorter than stock in one week, realy impresive service. Bought the bike and away I go. Strengths: Brakes are fabulous, I can not belive how well it handles for such a big bike. After the Harley this is a revelation. Weaknesses: Havent found any yet.

Ride quality & brakes5 out of 5

Engine5 out of 5

Reliability & build quality5 out of 5

Value vs rivals5 out of 5

Equipment4 out of 5

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BMW R1200RT motorcycle review - Riding

Sours: https://www.motorcyclenews.com/bike-reviews/bmw/r1200rt/2005/

From the first glimpse of the R 1200 RT, there’s no mistaking that it is a completely new motorcycle. Dramatically styled new bodywork makes a clear break from the old R 1150 RT, yet provides improved rider and passenger comfort thanks to improved aerodynamics. Integrated rearview mirrors/turn-signals help manage airflow around the rider’s hands to provide a generous still-air pocket and protection from weather. Compared to the R 1150 RT, the new windscreen is taller and wider, also for better rider protection but also, because it’s important in a motorcycle of this caliber, excellent passenger weather protection with a minimum of fatiguing turbulence.

A prominent split grill channels cooling air over the R 1200 RT’s large engine-oil cooler and brackets a new style of "freeform" headlight. Because superior nighttime illumination is critical to long-distance riders, the R 1200 RT features geometrically optimized surface contours that redirect the efforts of two H7 halogen bulbs for the low beam and a single, central H7 halogen light for the high beam.

The rider’s view from the saddle is at once familiar and yet completely new. Among the familiar touches is the ergonomic profile of the R 1200 RT, which is based heavily on the extremely comfortable R 1150 RT. (In fact, the handlebars are the same as before except for a revised finish.) This means that the R 1200 RT has the ideal seat-handlebar-footpeg relationship for long-range touring, placing the rider in a comfortable, upright position that reduces fatigue and improves control of the motorcycle.

 

Seating options abound. The R 1200 RT comes standard with a split saddle that allows for two-position adjustment of the rider’s portion, resulting in a seat height of either 32.3 or 33.1 inches (820 or 840mm). A lower seat is available that reduces overall seat height to 30.7 or 31.5 inches (780 or 800mm). In both cases, the seats themselves and the area around them have been resculpted in the R 1200 RT to maximize legroom and reduce the effective reach to the ground, which provides surefooted handling at a stop.

The R 1200 RT is clad in dynamic new bodywork that channels ambient air as well as engine-cooling air effectively around the rider and passenger. As before, the windshield is electrically moved within a wide range of positions to optimize wind protection and minimize turbulence for riders of all sizes.

A new rail mounting system is installed on the top of the fuel tank to improve the security and convenience of the optional tank bag. This is in addition to standard 32-liter hard saddlebags that feature new four-point mounting systems and, as ever, weather-resistant seals, and locks keyed to the ignition key. An integrated luggage rack can carry extra gear or be fitted with one of two optional topcases of either 28 or 49 Litres’ capacity. (The 28-liter topcase is all black, while the larger case is White Aluminum Metallic over black. The side cases are color matched to the motorcycle.)

  • Hazard warning flashers

  • Single key locks

  • Closed Loop 3 Way Catalytic Converter

  • Adjustable handbrake, clutch levers

  • Adjustable rider’s seat

  • BMW Integral ABS (Partial System)

  • Luggage rack

  • Diagnostic interface

  • Electronic immobilizer

  • Info flat screen

  • Power socket

Review

BMW shocked us early in 2004 when it released the ground-up re-think of the iconic Boxer GS. The R1200GS proved to be heaps better than the R1150GS, gaining a significant boost in power while losing a hefty chunk of weight.

I suppose, then, it shouldn't have surprised us to find out the new R1200RT is every bit of the huge leap forward over the previous generation. The sportbike formula of more power and less weight again proves its efficacy in other classes of bikes, as the loss of a claimed 44 pounds and the addition of 15 horsepower compared to the R1150RT makes this comfy touring bike feel like a nimbler sport-tourer.

BMW started with the GS's 1170cc Boxer Twin and hot-rodded it with a bigger airbox, more aggressive cams and a full-point bump in its compression ratio to 12.0:1. The result, claims BMW, is 110 peak ponies at 7500 rpm, 10 more than claimed for the GS. And its 85 lb-ft of torque at 6000 rpm is up nearly 15% from the 74 lb-ft claimed for the old R1150RT.

After riding the RT at its press introduction, we ordered up a test bike for the MCUSA fleet. Kenny rode it from SoCal to our headquarters in Oregon, where we strapped it to the dyno to check on the power sent to the rear wheel. We were impressed when it cranked out nearly 100 horsies (97.3) at 7900 rpm, just prior to hitting the rev limiter but after BMW's claimed redline of 7500 rpm. Torque stays above 60 lb-ft shortly after 3000 rpm, growing to 74.4 lb-ft at its 6400-rpm peak.



The old R1150RT was basically a full-fairing version of the R1150RS. For 2005, BMW has dropped the RS in favor of the new R1200ST, a sportier version of the new RT but using much less bodywork and features for a lighter steed.

At the siblings' press introduction, I spent a few hours aboard the 60-pound lighter ST before sampling the RT. I had been enjoying the ST's newfound power and sporty feeling, so it was a shock to sit behind the RT's acres of plastic. In contrast to the ST's relatively lithe physique, the RT wide expanse of wind protection and broad seat make it initially feel like a bit of a pig.
 

Engaging first gear in its revamped six-speed transmission (with quieter helical-cut gears) is now easier than ever, and the RT surprised me with its apparent lack of heft at low speeds, the Boxer engine's low center of gravity evidently playing a role.

I rolled off out of town, angling the electrically adjustable windscreen higher to fully block the oncoming air. Soon I was on a sparsely traveled and somewhat curvy backroad, happily cruising along in comfort and grace. Then I noticed the needle of the easy-to-read analog speedo was pointing at 90, so I assumed this RT might be a Euro-spec bike with kilometers-per-hour readings. Well, no, it turned out it was in mph-that's how comfortable and composed this bike is at speed while its rider is ensconced in a pocket of still air.

"I traveled from L.A. to Medford up I-5 in two days on the 1200RT, and I can tell you that this bike is the most comfortable motorcycle I have ever ridden on that stretch of road," comments Editorial Director Ken Hutchison.

Straight-line cruising is effortless on the RT. The revised Boxer engine drones along capably and without the bothersome surging of some previous models, and it pulls clean and strong from just 2500 rpm. A balance shaft that debuted on the 1200GS means that intrusive vibration doesn't come into play until top-gear revs are in the go-to-jail category.

Ergonomically, the RT's riding position is about as neutral as they come, as its rider is in a comfy upright position with a decent amount of legroom. Tall riders will probably prefer the broad two-position seat in its higher 33.1-inch setting rather than the 32.3-inch standard position. Shorter riders can order an optional seat that lowers the height to either 30.7 inches or 31.5.

The RT's windscreen, now taller and wider than previous, proved to be highly versatile. When in its low position, a rider can easily look over its upper edge and enjoy a bit of cooling breeze; in its most vertical position, it provides a huge bubble of shelter. In addition, the RT's integrated rearview mirrors/turn-signals help keep a rider's hands protected from chilling wind, and the side fairings do a similar job for legs.

"The windscreen actually suits me just fine in its low setting, although there is a substantial amount of wind noise that comes into play," says Hutch. "On the opposite end of the spectrum, the tallest setting completely shields my 5'8" body from the elements and drastically reduces wind noise."

Okay, so it's no surprise this born-again RT is comfortable. What was surprising was how well the big-boned Beemer could be hustled down a twisty road. A revised Telelever front end gives improved feedback, and its rake angle is set at a slightly steeper 26.7-degrees. Trail, too, gets a bit sportier, reducing from 4.8 inches to 4.3 inches. These two reductions result in a nimbler feel from behind the bars, despite the wheelbase remaining constant at 58.5 inches. (An odd snafu prevented us from weighing the RT on our scales, but BMW claims it weighs 571 pounds full of fuel but without the saddlebags.)

"I had a lot of fun blasting the backroads of Oregon during our time with the RT," notes Hutchison. "For such a massive looking machine the RT actually handles very well and is surprisingly nimble for a bike of its size. It really scoots through the turns, it's stable and holds a line very well, and it doesn't take a whole lot of extra effort to get it to change direction."

Holding up the 120/70 and 180/55 17-inch rubber are Brembo-made wheels that are lighter than before, reducing unsprung mass for better handling and improved suspension control. At the rear, BMW's Paralever shaft drive also acts as a swingarm, borrowing the GS's newer and lighter Paralever that is made of tough forged aluminum. The shock is adjustable for preload and rebound damping, while compression is handled by travel-dependant circuitry that gets stiffer as the shock is compressed. When combined with the revised Telelever front end, also made of forged aluminum, the RT's suspension does a wonderful job of soaking up bumps - it's only on sharp hits like Botts Dots that it feels harsh.

"The Telelever front end continues to evolve and this version is of course better than previous," says Hutch. "Feedback that was lost in previous versions is now more evident - it's not as familiar feeling as a fork, but it is getting closer."

In addition to its innovative and mostly effective suspension systems, BMW has become the biggest purveyor of luxury and comfort amenities. The RT is no different, and its list of standard features includes ABS, a power outlet, luggage rack and color-matched saddlebags, among a couple others.

"The RT comes equipped with two of the greatest OEM components to make their way onto any motorcycle: cruise control and heated grips," Kenny declares. "The great thing about the RT is its sweet rider accommodations."

And if that's not enough for you, the clever Germans have more to offer if you're willing to pay extra for it. A heated seat can be a godsend on cold rides, a trip computer is handy while traveling, a radio/CD player helps pass the miles, a choice of two top cases will hold more stuff, and BMW's Navigator II GPS moving-map system will help find your way.

Of the above options, our tester had only the stereo system. While we appreciated having tunes along for the ride, some of us found its myriad controls and buttons difficult to navigate without looking away from the road.

"This stereo is a double-edged sword," notes Hutch. "It offers a great break from the typical mind-numbing sound of the wind that accompanies any long trip and helps you forget about the amount of time in the saddle. And it gave me something to do to satisfy my innate desire to fidget with electronic equipment, which brings me to the con side of having a stereo. The handlebar-mounted stereo operation center, as I like to call it, is difficult to 'feel' your way to the controls on the first try. This nearly gave me a heart attack when the car I was following during one such moment got hard on their brakes. It's easy to forget you are on a motorcycle when you have all these gizmos to play with, so take a bit of advice and make sure not to sacrifice paying attention for trying to fine tune your tunes."

The RT's most notable option is BMW's Electronic Suspension Adjustment. Better known as ESA, this $750 selection allows a rider to adjust the shock's spring preload and damping from the cockpit and while moving. Sadly, our test unit was not equipped with ESA, but the scuttlebutt is that it's a very worthy option.

One item that some of us wish was optional is BMW's EVO power brake system with the Partial Integral anti-lock brakes. Optional on the R1200ST, the Partial Integral ABS is a form of linked brakes in which braking power is applied to the front andrear brakes when the hand lever is cued, governed by an electric power-assist mechanism. The amount of rear-brake application via the bar lever is electronically controlled depending on conditions. The rear brake pedal operates only the rear brake.

While we appreciated the extra safety provided by ABS, and the linked braking was transparent enough not to be intrusive, we're not entirely sold on a motorcycle needing power brakes. Sure, the twin 320mm floating front discs and single 265mm rear disc (and Brembo 4-piston calipers) provide plenty of whoa action, but the power-assist makes feedback feel unnatural. And when the bike is not running, there is only about 5% of braking power available, which can make for tense moments when pushing it around your driveway.

In one disturbing instance, the ABS malfunction light glowed back at me as I began to ride off from a stop, and I noticed the brakes' power assist wasn't functioning. I kept grabbing the brake lever to activate it, but it wouldn't respond to repeated attempts. I pulled the brake lever once more and the power brakes had suddenly and magically turned on, nearly catapulting my body through the windscreen! I'd much prefer having a direct connection to the bike, but Kenny had some different thoughts.

"I like the security of having ABS and the power-assist braking BMW has integrated into the RT," he notes. "Some people will complain about the lack of feel or whatever it may be, but the fact remains that ABS is a great addition to a bike that will be ridden from one end of the earth to the other, regardless of weather conditions. I have mixed feelings about the power assist, though. I can see the point that some level of feel is sacrificed, but it certainly seems to help haul a bike of this size down without much effort at the lever."

Although we didn't have the opportunity to sample a top box, each of the RT's standard side cases was able to swallow 32-liters of stuff. Recently redesigned, now with a four-point mounting system, the bags proved to be better than ever.

"The ease with which they can be installed and removed is a welcome change to the equipment just one year ago," explains Kenny. "The release mechanism in the handle no longer requires use of the key to open the bags as long as you do not lock them."

Frequent fuel stops are a major inhibitor of making efficient traveling time, but the RT can take you more than 300 miles on a tankful if you're judicious with the throttle. On his freeway stint up to Oregon at 75-85 mph, Kenny averaged 52 mpg, which combined with a generous 7.1-gallon tank means that its rider will probably be ready to stop before the RT will.

BMW has long been a reliable source for mile-munching touring bikes, and the R1200RT might be its best one yet. It is blessed with Gold-Wing-like comfort yet weighs several hundred pounds less, so it's fun to ride on twisty roads and not ponderous.

As with all things BMW, the only real obstacle to entry into the fraternity is the Corolla-like MSRP. The new RT retails for $17,490, so your 1986 Honda Magna trade-in ain't gonna get you far. Check all the option boxes and you're looking at a $20K ticket.

Still, the 1200RT is only $900 extra over the 1150RT and, like the excellent new GS, this RT is a Shaq step forward for the model line. It's one of the first directions we'd turn when setting out on a cross-country journey.

Source Motorcycle-USA   

Sours: https://www.motorcyclespecs.co.za/model/bmw/bmw_r1200rt%2006.htm
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BMW R1200RT

Biarritz blue BMW R1200RT
ManufacturerBMW Motorrad
Production2005-2019
PredecessorR1150RT
ClassTouring or sport touring
Engine1,170 cc (71 cu in) 8-valve flat twin
Bore / stroke101 mm × 73 mm (4.0 in × 2.9 in)
Compression ratio12.0:1
Power81 kW (109 hp) @ 7,750 rpm[1]
Torque120 N⋅m (89 lbf⋅ft) @ 6,000 rpm[1]
Transmission6-speed sequential manual transmission, shaft-drive
Frame typeLoad-bearing unit construction engine & gearbox, with front & rear subframes
SuspensionFront: Telelever
Rear: Paralever
BrakesIntegral ABS (part-integral)
Front: 4-piston calipers with floating 320 mm discs
Rear: 2-piston floating caliper with single 265 mm disc
TiresFront: 120/70ZR17 on 3.50 x 17 rim
Rear: 180/55ZR17 on 5.50 x 17 rim
Cast aluminium wheels
Rake, trail26.4°, 116 mm (4.6 in)
Wheelbase1,485 mm (58.5 in)
DimensionsL: 2,230 mm (88 in)
W: 905 mm (35.6 in)
H: 1,430 mm (56 in)
Seat heightAdjustable 820 to 840 mm (32.3–33.1 in)
Low seat option: 780 to 800 mm (30.7–31.5 in)
Weight229 kg (505 lb) (dry)
259 kg (571 lb) w/o panniers (wet)
Fuel capacity25 L (5.5 imp gal; 6.6 US gal)
Fuel consumption41.6 mpg‑US (5.65 L/100 km; 50.0 mpg‑imp)[2]
RelatedR1200GS
R1200R
R1200ST

The BMW R1200RT is a touring or sport touring motorcycle that was manufactured from 2005 to 2019 by BMW Motorrad to replace the R1150RT model. It features a 1,170 cc (71 cu in) flat-twin engine with a six-speed gearbox and shaft drive.

History[edit]

Previous RT models, 1978 to 2005[edit]

BMW Motorrad began manufacturing RT (Reise-Tourer, or travel tourer) touring motorcycle models in the late 1970s. The first of these was air-cooled (or "airhead") models that continued BMW's long tradition dating to 1923 of producing "boxer" or opposed flat-twin engined motorcycles with unit engine-transmission construction and shaft-final-drive.

In 1995, BMW produced its first air and oil-cooled (or "oilhead") RT model, the R1100RT. The new machine included standard ABS brakes, four-valve heads, five-speed gearbox, Telelever front suspension, Paralever rear suspension, and an electrically adjustable screen.

In 2001, BMW launched the R1150RT, providing the same basic platform with increased engine capacity and horsepower, fully linked power-assisted ABS brakes, revised front lighting system, and a six-speed gearbox. This model was further updated in 2004 by the adoption of dual ignition, with two spark plugs per cylinder.

Four generations of BMW RT motorcycles
Six generations of RT motorcycles from 1996 to the present
2010 R1200RT with double overhead cams

2005 to 2013[edit]

In 2005, BMW introduced the R1200RT.[3] The design of this model was completely different from the R1150RT with a 15% boost in power, 20 kg (44 lb) weight saving,[3][4] optional electronic suspension adjustment (ESA) and on-board computer. A low seat and/or a lowered suspension were available for shorter riders reducing seat height to a lowest level of 820 mm (32.3 in),[4] although the lowered suspension eliminates the ESA option. The standard electrically operated windscreen was adjustable across a range of heights.

The servo powered ABS brakes on the 2005 and 2006 models were partially integrated such that the rear brake pedal only applies the rear brake while the front brake lever applies both brakes. For the 2007 model year, servo assist was removed from the partially integrated brakes. A new, more advanced and lighter ABS system was produced by Continental Teves, which also produced the optional Automatic Stability Control (ASC),[5] in BMW's traction control system for motorcycles.[6]

An electronic tire pressure monitor (TPM) was introduced as an option. During the production of the 2006 models, the original two-tone horns were replaced by a single-tone horn. Other optional equipment included cruise control, heated grips, heated seats for both the rider and passenger and a CD/Radio audio system.

With 110 hp (82 kW) and 85 lbf⋅ft (115 N⋅m) of torque, the R1200RT is suitable for long-distance touring carrying a rider and passenger and a full load of luggage; and is able to reach 135 mph (217 km/h) and do a standing quarter mile in 12.2 seconds.[3]

In November 2009, BMW announced some revisions to the R1200RT for the 2010 model year. The new model had the same horsepower, but more torque at 88 lbf⋅ft (119 N⋅m), a higher engine speed of 8,500 rpm, and double overhead camshafts that were first used on the BMW HP2 Sport.[7]

There were some relatively minor styling changes and revisions to the screen and cockpit designs, switchgear (including conventional indicators), and location of the hydraulic fluid reservoirs.

2014 to 2018[edit]

San Marino blue 2015 R1200RT

The 2014 model represented a wholesale redesign of the R1200RT. The biggest change was a shift to a water cooled version of the boxer engine,[8] producing dyno tested 113.5 horsepower (84.6 kW) and 82.1 pound-feet (111.3 N⋅m) torque.[9] BMW claimed 125 horsepower and 92 lb/ft of torque with their own testing methodology.[10] The seat and seating position, fairing, instrumentation, and frame were also updated. The standard ride modes "Rain" and "Road" can also be activated at the press of a button to adapt to weather conditions and road surfaces. An on-board computer, an electrically operated windshield, standard color-matched saddle bags, and heated grips were also basic items.

Optional equipment for the 2014 RT includes semi-active electronic suspension adjustment, and BMW Dynamic ESA, which response to changing road surfaces, and a shift assistant pro that allows the rider to shift up and down without using the clutch or throttle. A central locking system locks both cases by remote control. Other options are a radio, a top case, low or high saddles, a tank bag, cruise control, and (introduced for the 2015 model) keyless ignition and locking

Alpine white 2017 R1200RT

The 2017 R1200RTs are fitted with a judder damper on the transmission output shaft to control rapid and forceful shaking and vibration. New features also include a revised selector drum actuator, transmission shafts, and transmission shaft bearing. As part of the Ride Modes Pro option package, ABS Pro was available, which senses a lean angle and adjusts intervention accordingly.

The only changes for the 2018 model year were colors.[citation needed]

2019[edit]

In mid-2017 Motorrad reported that BMW was planning to soon introduce variable valve timing (VVT) on its boxer engines.[11] In March, 2018, Bennetts announced that BMW was testing an RT with VVT, possibly a successor to the R1200RT.[12] In September, Kevin Cameron wrote that a "shift cam" VVT system was destined for a 2019 model year R1250GS, and other media reported the technology was to be adopted on all the R series boxer motors.[13][14] BMW confirmed the R1250RT would have VVT in September 2018.[15]

Specifications (2005-2013)[edit]

See information box for other specifications
Swingarm, rear-wheel and rear brakes on a 2015 R1200RT

Engine[edit]

  • Type — Air/oil-cooled, four-stroke two-cylinder boxer engine, dual overhead camshafts per cylinder (single prior to 2010) and four valves per cylinder, central balance shaft
  • Mixture control / engine management — Electronic intake pipe injection/digital engine management: BMW engine management, BMS-K with overrun fuel cut-off, dual ignition
  • Emission control — Closed-loop three-way catalytic converter
  • Fuel type — Unleaded premium, 95 or 98 Octane (RON) with automatic knock control

Electrical system[edit]

  • Alternator — 720 watts 60 amperes three-phase alternator
  • Battery — 12 volts, 19 ampere hours - 170A

Power transmission[edit]

https://www.bmwmotorcycle.com/2014-bmw-r-1200-rt-information/

Chassis[edit]

  • Frame — Three-section frame consisting of front and rear section, load bearing engine-gearbox unit
  • Front wheel location / suspension — Telelever; stanchion diameter 35 mm, central spring strut, rebound damping electronically adjustable with standard ESA
  • Rear wheel location / suspension — EVO-Paralever die-cast aluminium single-sided swinging arm; spring pre-load hydraulically adjustable to continuously variable levels by means of electronically adjustable ESA, rebound damping with standard ESA
  • Travel front/rear — 4.72 inches (120 mm) / 5.31 inches (135 mm)

Authorities models[edit]

BMW Authority Vehicles produce factory built versions of the R1200RT, including an authorities only 878 cc R900RT model, specifically for emergency services use, including police, paramedic, blood transfusion, fire services, and escort duty.[16]

BMW bikes have been popular with United Kingdom police forces in the past and many chose to return to them in 2007, taking delivery of the R1200RT after the Honda ST1300 Pan-European was withdrawn due to handling concerns.[17] It is also used by the traffic police in Ireland.

Many states and cities in the United States use the R1200RT-P for police duty, mostly in the West including by the California Highway Patrol and Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department.[18] Acceptance of BMW's earlier R1100RT-P and R1150RT-P models had been moderate, but in 2005 came both the introduction of the more capable R1200RT-P and the end of production of Kawasaki's economical KZ1000P police motorcycle. As a result, BMWs and Harley Davidsons have taken most of the American market, though the 2011 re-entry of Kawasaki to the public-safety field has given the RT-P a strong second rival. In the United States, more than 225 law enforcement agencies have BMW authority motorcycles in their fleets of patrol vehicles.[19] BMW claims to have produced over 80,000 motorcycles specifically for public safety use.

The Authorities variant is based on the standard R1200RT but can be recognized by the addition of stainless steel protection bars (colloquially known as "crash bars") situated about the front fairing and panniers, also often used for mounting of additional equipment such as sirens. Paint and trim schemes also reflect the service use, most often black and white "panda paint," such as found on many patrol cars. The large, flat side panels on the R1200RT-P are a convenient and easily seen location for insignia.

Other changes include unique top-loading panniers (also known as "saddle boxes"), a single-seat (with radio box in place of the RT's pillion seat), additional switchgear for equipment, emergency lighting, and an additional auxiliary battery which feeds all public safety electrical equipment. An additional feature of the RT-P is the reprogramming of the onboard computer to allow a motor officer to lock in their current speed on the speedometer display. The officer only needs to match speed with a target vehicle, press the "BC" button on the handlebars, and the speed is visible for later reference.

Optional equipment available through BMW includes electrically operated racks for mounting shotguns or rifles, as well as holders for nightsticks, flashlights, radar or lidar guns, citation books, and radio antenna mounts. Many of these items are also available from aftermarket manufacturers or may even be locally made.

The standard configuration of the R1200RT-P model used in the United States uses a 100-watt siren speaker mounted on the left front protection bar, and LED lighting pods (which were specially designed for the RT-P) above the front turn signals, and on the top rear edge of the radio box, all supplied by Code 3 Public Safety Equipment. There are also mounting hardpoints for mobile radar antennas. Optional lighting which may be installed includes bright lights for illuminating a scene or to the sides, and a light mounted on a telescoping post at the right rear, which can be operated while lowered for normal use, or raised to provide omnidirectional warning while stopped (such as at an accident scene).

Firefighting vehicle[edit]

In July 2010, Merseyside Fire and Rescue Service in England began trialling a Firexpress fire bike version of the R1200RT fitted with twin 25 L (5.5 imp gal; 6.6 US gal) water tanks and a 30 m (98 ft) hose, capable of delivering water spray or foam to extinguish fires.[20]

While not suitable for extended use—due to the small amount of fire retardant and single firefighter carried—the motorcycle is able to reach the scene of a fire faster than a fire truck, especially in cases such as a vehicle fire (which typically results in traffic jams which can delay fire trucks). This may reduce the spread of a fire, or even extinguish it while it is still small. In addition, the firefighter can give a report of the nature of the fire, thus enabling the agency to more rapidly task appropriate equipment.

Reviews and awards[edit]

The R1200RT was selected as best touring bike by two major American monthly motorcycle magazines in 2005 and 2006.[21]

In September 2006, the R1200RT was named the United Kingdom's 'number one motorcycle' by readers of RiDE magazine in its annual "RiDER POWER" survey.[22] It repeated this achievement in 2007, reached second place overall in 2008,[4] and won the top spot once more in 2009.

In October 2006, the R1200RT was cited as a best tourer for the second year in a row by UK newspaper Motor Cycle News.

The 2014 model was selected as best sport-touring bike of the year by Cycle World.[23]

Road tests published in Motorcyclist praised the 2014 model for its fine engine, "right-sized" ergonomics, and suspension "nearly immune to braking or accelerating influence".[8]

The 2014 model was the winner of the 2014 Rider magazine people's choice vote.

Motorcyclist chose it in 2014 as the best touring bike for 2014. For the second year in a row, Motorcyclist magazine chose the BMW R1200RT as the 2015 "Best Touring Bike."

In its August 2015 long-term wrap-up, Paul Dean, of Cycle World, wrote "For riders who love to travel, enjoy having a little fun on the back roads, and often do both with a passenger, the RT could very well be the perfect motorcycle. Way, way more than just the best sport tourer."[24]

Motorcycle.com selected the R1200RT as its 2015 "Best Sport-Tourer".

Safety issues[edit]

The R1200RT has been affected by a number of safety issues since its launch. The UK Vehicle and Operator Services Agency (VOSA) has issued six separate vehicle recalls covering the front brakes,[25][26]anti-lock braking system,[27][28] throttle cable,[29] and clutch.[30]

References[edit]

  1. ^ ab"R1200RT Data Sheet"(PDF). BMW Motorrad. Retrieved 18 February 2010.
  2. ^"LAW ENFORCEMENT MOTORCYCLE TEST AND EVALUATION PROGRAM"(PDF). Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department. October 2010. Archived from the original(PDF) on 24 July 2011. Retrieved 2 November 2010.
  3. ^ abc"Motorcycle Reviews". Motorcycle News. Archived from the original on 27 September 2007. Retrieved 2007-08-31.
  4. ^ abc"BMW R1200RT". RiDE (December 2008). pp. 130–131. ISSN 1360-3507.
  5. ^"Traction control comes to the street from an unlikely source: BMW". American Motorcyclist Association. 13 July 2006. Archived from the original on 28 September 2007. Retrieved 2007-08-31.
  6. ^Kevin Ash. "BMW ASC traction control". Archived from the original on 17 January 2010. Retrieved 2010-01-03.
  7. ^"2010 BMW R 1200 RT: Dual Overhead Cams and More Power!". WebBikeWorld. November 5, 2009. Retrieved 2009-11-05.
  8. ^ abMarc Cook (June 2, 2014), "2014 BMW R1200RT road test", Motorcyclist
  9. ^Paul Dean (April 30, 2014), "BMW R1200RT – Road Test Review", Cycle World
  10. ^Specifications by BMW Motorrad USA
  11. ^Tod Rafferty (August 2, 2017), "BMW GS Series to Get Variable Valve Timing?", RideApart
  12. ^Ben Purvis (March 7, 2018), "BMW RT goes 1250 VVT for 2019?", BikeSocial (online), Bennetts
  13. ^Kevin Cameron (September 14, 2018), "BMW Adopts Variable Valve Timing On 2019 R1250GS Adventure Bike", Cycle World
  14. ^Jensen Beeler (September 13, 2018), "Here Is the BMW R1250GS with "Shiftcam" Engine Technology", Asphalt & Rubber
  15. ^Dennis Chung (September 17, 2018), 2019 BMW R1250GS And R1250RT With ShiftCam VVT Announced, Motorcycle.com
  16. ^"Emergency services version of the R1200RT and R900RT". BMW Motorrad Authorities.[permanent dead link]
  17. ^"Police withdraw Pan over safety concerns". Motorcycle News. 14 May 2007. Retrieved 15 May 2010.
  18. ^Carpenter, Susan (June 25, 2008), "BMW's R1200RT-P: Big, bad and packing heat", The Los Angeles Times, retrieved 2013-07-07
  19. ^BMW Police Motorcycles
  20. ^"Motorbike pilot scheme for Merseyside firefighters". BBC News. 23 July 2010. Archived from the original on 27 July 2010. Retrieved 23 July 2010.
  21. ^"Accolades". BMW Motorrad USA. Archived from the original on 2007-06-22. Retrieved 2007-08-31.
  22. ^"BMW wins Rider Power awards". Inside Bikes News. 26 September 2006. Retrieved 2010-12-28.
  23. ^"Best sport-touring bike: BMW R1200RT", Cycle World, July 29, 2014
  24. ^"2014 BMW R1200RT – LONG-TERM TEST WRAP-UP", Cycle World, August 9, 2015
  25. ^"Recall RM/2008/019". VOSA. 12 June 2008. Archived from the original on 14 June 2011. Retrieved 7 January 2009.
  26. ^"Recall RM/2009/025". VOSA. 24 June 2009. Archived from the original on 14 June 2011. Retrieved 4 November 2009.
  27. ^"Recall RM/2006/020". VOSA. 14 March 2006. Archived from the original on 14 June 2011. Retrieved 7 January 2009.
  28. ^"Recall RM/2006/021". VOSA. 14 March 2006. Archived from the original on 14 June 2011. Retrieved 7 January 2009.
  29. ^"Recall RM/2005/015". VOSA. 18 March 2005. Archived from the original on 14 June 2011. Retrieved 7 January 2009.
  30. ^"Recall RM/2006/023". VOSA. 14 March 2006. Archived from the original on 14 June 2011. Retrieved 7 January 2009.

External links[edit]

Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BMW_R1200RT
2006 BMW R1200RT Ride \u0026 Spec Video! Lots of Options! Great Machine!

R 1200 RT: A NEW DIRECTION FOR BMW DESIGN

From the first glimpse of the new R 1200 RT, there’s no mistaking that it is a completely new motorcycle. Dramatically styled new bodywork makes a clear break from the old R 1150 RT, yet provides improved rider and passenger comfort thanks to improved aerodynamics. Integrated rearview mirrors/turn-signals help manage airflow around the rider’s hands to provide a generous still-air pocket and protection from weather. Compared to the R 1150 RT, the new windscreen is taller and wider, also for better rider protection but also, because it’s important in a motorcycle of this caliber, excellent passenger weather protection with a minimum of fatiguing turbulence.

A prominent split grill channels cooling air over the R 1200 RT’s large engine-oil cooler and brackets a new style of "freeform" headlight. Because superior nighttime illumination is critical to long-distance riders, the R 1200 RT features geometrically optimized surface contours that redirect the efforts of two H7 halogen bulbs for the low beam and a single, central H7 halogen light for the high beam.


ERGONOMICALLY CORRECT, AS USUAL

The rider’s view from the saddle is at once familiar and yet completely new. Among the familiar touches is the ergonomic profile of the R 1200 RT, which is based heavily on the extremely comfortable R 1150 RT. (In fact, the handlebars are the same as before except for a revised finish.) This means that the R 1200 RT has the ideal seat-handlebar-footpeg relationship for long-range touring, placing the rider in a comfortable, upright position that reduces fatigue and improves control of the motorcycle.

Seating options abound. The R 1200 RT comes standard with a split saddle that allows for two-position adjustment of the rider’s portion, resulting in a seat height of either 32.3 or 33.1 inches (820 or 840mm). A lower seat is available that reduces overall seat height to 30.7 or 31.5 inches (780 or 800mm). In both cases, the seats themselves and the area around them have been resculpted in the R 1200 RT to maximize legroom and reduce the effective reach to the ground, which provides surefooted handling at a stop.

The R 1200 RT is clad in dynamic new bodywork that channels ambient air as well as engine-cooling air effectively around the rider and passenger. As before, the windshield is electrically moved within a wide range of positions to optimize wind protection and minimize turbulence for riders of all sizes.

A new rail mounting system is installed on the top of the fuel tank to improve the security and convenience of the optional tank bag. This is in addition to standard 32-liter hard saddlebags that feature new four-point mounting systems and, as ever, weather-resistant seals, and locks keyed to the ignition key. An integrated luggage rack can carry extra gear or be fitted with one of two optional topcases of either 28 or 49 liters’ capacity. (The 28-liter topcase is all black, while the larger case is White Aluminum Metallic over black. The side cases are color matched to the motorcycle.)


Standart Equipment :

  • Hazard warning flashers
  • Single key locks
  • Closed Loop 3 Way Catalytic Converter
  • Adjustable handbrake, clutch levers
  • Adjustable rider’s seat
  • BMW Integral ABS (Partial System)
  • Luggage rack
  • Diagnostic interface
  • Electronic immobilizer
  • Info flat screen
  • Power socket

Available Equipment :

 

  • Gray seat
    N / C
  • Black seat
    N / C
  • Low seat
    N / C
  • Heated Seat
    $270.00
  • Chrome Exhaust
    $125.00
  • Electronic Suspension Adjustment (ESA)
    $775.00
  • Oil Level Warning
    $50.00
  • On Board Computer
    $215.00
  • Radio/CD
    $1450.00
  • Black Engine Spoiler
    N / C
  • Silver Engine Spoiler
    N / C
  • Clear turn signal lenses
    $50.00
  • Anti-theft alarm
    $225.00
  • Radio prep kit
    $390.00
  • Heated hand grips
    $200.00
  • Cruise control
    $310.00
  • Accessory Socket
    $40.00
About the author
Sours: https://www.topspeed.com/motorcycles/motorcycle-reviews/bmw/2006-bmw-r-1200-rt-ar7142.html

Specs bmw r1200rt 2006

General informationModel:BMW R 1200 RTYear:2006Category:TouringRating: 3.7  See the detailed rating of touring capabilities, reliability, accident risk, etc. Compare with any other motorbike.Engine and transmissionDisplacement:1170.0 ccm (71.39 cubic inches)Engine type:Twin, four-strokePower:108.6 HP (79.3 kW)) @ 7500 RPMTorque:115.0 Nm (11.7 kgf-m or 84.8 ft.lbs) @ 6000 RPMCompression:12.0:1Bore x stroke:101.0 x 73.0 mm (4.0 x 2.9 inches)Valves per cylinder:4Fuel system:Injection. Electronic intake pipe injection/digital engine management: BMW engine management, BMS-K with overrun fuel cut-off, dual ignitionFuel control:Single Overhead Cams (SOHC)Cooling system:Oil & airGearbox:6-speedTransmission type,
final drive:
Shaft drive (cardan)Clutch:Single-disc dry clutch, hydraulically operatedFuel consumption:3.60 litres/100 km (27.8 km/l or 65.34 mpg)Greenhouse gases:83.5 CO2 g/km. (CO2 - Carbon dioxide emission) Chassis, suspension, brakes and wheelsRake (fork angle):26.6°Trail:110 mm (4.3 inches)Front suspension:BMW Motorrad TeleleverFront wheel travel:120 mm (4.7 inches)Rear suspension:Die-cast aluminium single-sided swinging arm with BMW Motorrad Paralever, WAD suspension elementRear wheel travel:135 mm (5.3 inches)Front tire:120/70-ZR17 Rear tire:180/55-ZR17 Front brakes:Double discDiameter:320 mm (12.6 inches)Rear brakes:Double discDiameter:265 mm (10.4 inches)Physical measures and capacitiesDry weight:229.0 kg (504.9 pounds)Weight incl. oil, gas, etc:259.0 kg (571.0 pounds)Power/weight ratio:0.4743 HP/kgSeat height:820 mm (32.3 inches) If adjustable, lowest setting.Overall height:1430 mm (56.3 inches)Overall length:2230 mm (87.8 inches)Overall width:905 mm (35.6 inches)Wheelbase:1480 mm (58.3 inches)Fuel capacity:27.00 litres (7.13 US gallons)Other specificationsUpdate specsReport missing specs or required updates.Further informationInsurance costsCompare US insurance quotes from the nation's top providers.Finance optionsCompare US motorcycle loan quotes from the nation's top providers.Parts finderRevzilla offers up to 50% off motorcycle accessories.Accessories Ships to most countries. Also check out our overview of motorcycle webshops at Bikez.info.MaintenanceFind parts, fluids. filters, maintenance tools and service manuals at Amazon.com.Ask questionsJoin the 06 BMW R 1200 RT discussion group or the general BMW discussion group.Related bikesList related bikes for comparison of specs.

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2005 BMW R 1200 RT Walk-Around/Start-up

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